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  1. #21
    AT - 2013 PCT - 2014
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    I carried rain pants from beginning to end and used them enough to justify it. Also, in town I would wear them while doing laundry. I also used them for warmth on cool evenings after I sent my pants home. The WPB cuben variety comes in at about 3 oz. Well worth it for my set up.

    Quote Originally Posted by JeffBliss:1511580
    Quote Originally Posted by jbhh View Post
    4. No need for rainpants. You're going to get soaked anyway, and you'll never wear them. A good pair of Nike running shorts will treat you bet.
    I'm curious about this one. I just got back from doing Mt. Washington this weekend and I got caught in a nice horizontal rainstorm just below the summit. My rain jacket held up nicely but my lack of rain pants/skirt caused my nylon pants to cling to my legs in record time. I was damn cold from that alone and decided it was time I invested in some sort of protection below the waist.

    Wouldn't it be worth it alone due to the fact that it would at least prolong the time period from dry to absolutely soaked? It seriously killed my mental mood watching my pants get drenched in less than a minute during that storm.

  2. #22
    Registered User q-tip's Avatar
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    ++++ On Training. I found leg strength is infinitely more important than aerobic conditioning. I do a mountain training regimen that focuses on Leg Strength. Up steep hills with a backpack is extremely difficult. Training made the difference for me finishing 1,000 mi.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #23

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    I agree with a couple of suggestions made here.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffBliss View Post
    I'm curious about this one. I just got back from doing Mt. Washington this weekend and I got caught in a nice horizontal rainstorm just below the summit. My rain jacket held up nicely but my lack of rain pants/skirt caused my nylon pants to cling to my legs in record time. I was damn cold from that alone and decided it was time I invested in some sort of protection below the waist.

    Wouldn't it be worth it alone due to the fact that it would at least prolong the time period from dry to absolutely soaked? It seriously killed my mental mood watching my pants get drenched in less than a minute during that storm.
    I always carry rain pants when I am going to be spending significant time above tree line in the Whites. There have been plenty of times when I have opted not to put them on until I stop, but I have encountered enough nasty weather up there that I would not want to be without them, even in summer.

  5. #25
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    In the "Articles" section of this website, under "Hiker Advice" there used to be a great thread about what hikers would do differently if they hiked the Trail again, with all sorts of great comments. It seems to have disappeared. If anyone saved this (or if the moderators can restore it), I think a lot of folks would enjoy it. As I recall (it's been awhile since I had a look at it), my comments on this thread were perhaps my favorite, and maybe the most useful thing I ever posted to this website. Thanks!

  6. #26
    Registered User jbhh's Avatar
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    Rainpants are probably up to personal preference. I was so keen on cutting down on bulk and weight - and remember, I was sobo...so June/July I never really needed them, as long as I was moving I wasn't getting cold.

    These are the shorts I was wearing on my hike: http://ii.modells.com/fcgi-bin/iipsr...d=380&cvt=jpeg

    They dry out completely in <45 minutes after full saturation - they're absolutely amazing. I was sliding my bumper down rocks from day one to day 30, barely even show wear.

  7. #27
    Administrator attroll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Tarlin View Post
    In the "Articles" section of this website, under "Hiker Advice" there used to be a great thread about what hikers would do differently if they hiked the Trail again, with all sorts of great comments. It seems to have disappeared. If anyone saved this (or if the moderators can restore it), I think a lot of folks would enjoy it. As I recall (it's been awhile since I had a look at it), my comments on this thread were perhaps my favorite, and maybe the most useful thing I ever posted to this website. Thanks!
    Here is the article Jack is referring to what-would-you-do-differently-(Hiker-Advice).
    AT Troll (2010)
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  8. #28

  9. #29

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    Sounds right on in that link. That is why we are leaving Jan 1st 2014 to take up to 10 months if needed to finish. The first thru hike was good, the second will be the one that creates real long lasting memories.

  10. #30
    Clueless Weekender
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    Quote Originally Posted by attroll View Post
    Broken link:
    Invalid $idname specified. If you followed a valid link, please notify the webmaster
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  11. #31
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    Thanks guys, that was the one I was talking about.

  12. #32
    Administrator attroll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Another Kevin View Post
    Broken link:
    [/COLOR]
    Sorry here is the correct url http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/content.php?180
    AT Troll (2010)
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  13. #33

  14. #34
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    Question JBHH question:

    2. SHOES ARE IMPORTANT, WEAR TRAILRUNNERS

    If you hike in waterproof boots then you deserve every bit of trenchfoot discomfort you're going to get. I met a guy at the Eastern Mountain Sports in Manchester Center who made it all the way from Springer and talked to him about his boots - He was about to buy another pair of gortex whatever boots, I like to think I saved him. I got him to buy a pair of trailrunners and superfeet insoles. He emailed me the other day before he started the 100 mile wilderness and said how great the switch was (I am patting my own back).

    What brand are you wearing? How do you keep your feet warm in snow and icy slush? Thanks for the great advice...
    Last edited by Hey-Man; 08-15-2013 at 09:01. Reason: perhaps unclear that I'm asking a question to original post
    Hey Man! How's it going?

  15. #35
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    Hmm....

    So if you are hiking with a group just quit? Because you are out there for the wrong reason? What is the right one?
    If you wear waterproof shoes you deserve trench foot?

    I am having flashbacks to hostels where section hikers/former thru hikers would pontificate for hours on end....

    I didn't finish this year so take my advice with a grain of salt.... But I got on the trail having only hiked twice before in my life, no training, no feet conditioning, I kept up with most people (Maybe not Zippy and Diddo!!-Good to see you on here!). I hiked with a group the majority of the time. I didn't anticipate doing that but I made some great friendships and had some great times. The push to finish that long day in order to camp with your companions can be a good thing.

    My advice would be to just get out there to hike and not worry about if you're doing it right. Get your pack weight down to as little as possible and use common sense... Most of the people I saw that didn't make it had ridiculous packs weight wise. Girls don't need make up, no one needs changes of clothes. I absolutely needed rain pants for some of the winter storms we hiked through as NOBOs this year. In NH I cut them off at the knees.

    Then again my pack weighed less than most of my friends and still I got off and most everyone else finished, hike your own hike. I didn't set out thinking I would finish so maybe it is different for me, but to me I don't think finishing a thru hike is the most important thing! But to each their own!

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffBliss View Post
    I'm curious about this one. I just got back from doing Mt. Washington this weekend and I got caught in a nice horizontal rainstorm just below the summit. My rain jacket held up nicely but my lack of rain pants/skirt caused my nylon pants to cling to my legs in record time. I was damn cold from that alone and decided it was time I invested in some sort of protection below the waist.

    Wouldn't it be worth it alone due to the fact that it would at least prolong the time period from dry to absolutely soaked? It seriously killed my mental mood watching my pants get drenched in less than a minute during that storm.
    You may want to try a rain kilt. I got one from ULA that I used this summer.
    The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
    Richard Ewell, CSA General


  17. #37
    AT - 2013 PCT - 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by evan_rolltide:1517282
    (Maybe not Zippy and Diddo!!-Good to see you on here!)
    Hi Leprechaun! Good to see you too. I hope New Hampshire treated you well.

  18. #38

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    Hey! Great advice! I started SOBO mid June and ended up doing several sections this summer instead. I am planning on trying a NOBO mid March and think that I'm much more prepared after being thrown into the 100 mile wilderness, my own doing, mentally not 100% prepared. Really, there is nothing comparable to hiking the AT other then hiking the AT. Hope to see you out there!

  19. #39
    Virginia Tortoise
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    Very good advice. You missed the hardest part of the trail by not doing The Whites. I'll have to investigate those trail runners. However, in NH and VT, a good solid leather gortex boot will help protect your feet. I tried a high top trail hiker type of shoe when I sectioned from North Adams, MA to Franconia Notch, NH in 2009. I had to buy new boots in Manchester Center, VT because my feet were blistering like crazy. Went with a composite Vasque GTX and had no problems the rest of the trip.

  20. #40

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    Thanks JB. I especially agree with the walk barefoot advice. Turning the soles of your feet into leather prior to a thru has got to be good advice. Here in Fla, I like to walk barefoot on the beach for miles....exfoliates too!

    And good to see someone *not* hanging their head in shame when they sensibly get off the trail.

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