Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 32 of 32
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-04-2009
    Location
    Panama City Beach, FL
    Age
    63
    Posts
    1,777

    Default

    anyone know if most health insurance covers any of these sleep apnea treatments?

  2. #22
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    8,925
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cherokee Bill View Post
    Question for "past" Thru-hikers! How many over 60-years old, and having sleep apnea. took the plunge and did a Thru hike anyway??
    Based on what Ive heard coming from old guys at shelters, its not uncommon at all.
    Of course, they may not know, or realize how bad they have sleep apnea.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 07-28-2013 at 11:05.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  3. #23

    Default

    My dad is a section hiker, but has gone out for as long as a month at a stretch. He also has severe sleep apnea. He uses a CPAP at home, but won't hike with one even if it has a battery pack. He is afraid it will break, and they definitely are not cheap. He uses a chin strap instead. My mom says it stops his snoring, and he says that he awakens feeling as rested as he does when he uses his CPAP at home.

  4. #24

    Default

    I forgot to mention that he had a repeat of his sleep study about six months ago and he used his chin strap for a three hour section of the study. The tech noted that his apnea events declined sharply during that three hour period. It works by retraining the jaw to position itself properly during sleep - stopping the collapse that causes the airway to become blocked. I think there are a lot of them out there, but he got his on a BOGO free. My signature contains a link if you are interested in reading about how it works.
    Happy Trails,
    Jennifer S
    http://good-bye-snore.com

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2009
    Location
    Spring Lake, MI
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    There is nothing worse then being in a shelter with some one with sleep apnea. Except when there are two, one on either side of you! (Happend to me in the Smokies, no choice in
    This is SO TRUE!!! When my husband hikes with me (he has apnea), we tent it. While I realize extra weight is not the only cause of sleep apnea, it can be a contributing factor. When my husband's brother (who had apnea) lost 60 pounds and went into the normal range, he also "lost" his apnea. I am guessing my husband may be the same; however, it will be up to him to make that decision to drop that baggage.

  6. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-27-2003
    Location
    northern whites
    Posts
    3,453

    Default

    I ran into a couple of folks who had sleep apnea over the years. They generally tented near shelters as to not disturb the folks in the shelter. They would cook and eat supper at the shelter and socialize and then went to their tent. Some folks also noted that long distance hiking reduced their apnea.

  7. #27
    Registered User Paul the Brit's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-12-2011
    Location
    San Antonio Tx
    Age
    53
    Posts
    50

    Default

    I had the UUUP procedure some years ago and it worked for me. I have since then gained 40lb plus pounds and at times snore and have apnea episodes, not as bad as before but it does occur. I certainly do not see this is a limitation to go hiking in fact the opposite. One reason I am attempting a thru hike is to gain some of my lost health. I will tent and not primarily due to the snoring but tenting is the way I like to hike. Therefore disturbing others in the shelter isn't a concern.

    cherokee are you concerned that the apnea could cause a serious health incident on the trail without your bipap? If not then I would hike and reap the benefits.

    As as I said I have gained weight, on acid reflux and cholesterol meds and also now on sleep meds as I lack vitamin D ( I moved from an outside job of 30 years to working in an office with no natural light ) .......all reasons to hike and having completed my physical recently totally supported by my doctor.
    Www.walk4heroes.me
    @walk4heroes

  8. #28

    Default

    Regardless of age, why would sleep apnea prevent one from attempting a thru-hike?

  9. #29
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    8,925
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sly View Post
    Regardless of age, why would sleep apnea prevent one from attempting a thru-hike?
    Because some use a CPAP machine at home , and there is no place to plug it in on the trail.

    You usually wont die from apnea, although the people sleeping near you might want to kill you, but you are very tired the next day. They people I know who have used the machines wont sleep without them, they sleep much more restfully and feel much better.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-17-2013
    Location
    Wyoming
    Age
    63
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Hey Bill,
    Although I know the mouthpiece didn't work for you long term, I want to chime in that for me it is magic. When I wear it, I do not snore. When I don't I drive my wife out of the bedroom. I even wake myself up. It has been a life changer for me.

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-09-2013
    Location
    Western NC
    Age
    63
    Posts
    69

    Default

    You might also consider using a hammock on your hike instead of a tent or sleeping in shelters.

    I read where some studies show that sleeping with your head elevated can help in treating sleep apnea and my Doc also recommended it, so I gave it a try. I found it to be helpful - along with losing weight, using breath strips, and trying to sleep mostly on my side. So now when I backpack I use a hammock, since it keeps your upper body on a slight incline. I find I do not snore, I slept well, and I wake up rested.

    Just a thought.

  12. #32
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    8,925
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    http://www.mytranscend.com/

    apparently there ARE battery powered CPAP that can last a few days now.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •