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  1. #21
    Registered User Noah Genda's Avatar
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    I bought a ENO Doublenest to find out what the hub-bub was all about...first, the ENO is comfy. I even installed two heavy duty eye-screws in the livingroom to hang (because the weather hasn't been cooperating). You truly have to practice using a hammock to learn how you can find the best positions for your sleeping style...taking a nap is the best way to practice, but sleeping all night is a different trick.

    Those who tout that sleeping in a hammock (as opposed to the ground in a tent) as "the best sleep they ever got" are likely the kind of people who typically sleep on their back or semi-sided, or those who don't need to be as horizontal as a sleeping pad will allow. Wriggling in a hammock is easy to get in a new position, but it becomes complicated when you have to consider the underquilt or pad underneath your body - staying on the pad or other form of insulation is a challenge if you tend to be on the wriggly side.

    I don't expect to leave my Hammerhead tent home, but will pack the hammock once in a while for a nice place to relax. I love the pro slap-straps and ease of putting the hammock anywhere - that's a no-brainer. I can stay in the hammock well into the evening reading a book near the fire where my underside can feel the warmth, and perhaps doze off, but bedtime awaits on ThermaRest NeoAir. I am a 6'2" and a 245# side sleeper, but the hammock just doesn't allow me to find the sleep zone I prefer, but I can get some quality rest in it...just not throughout the entire night. More practice? Doubtful...but not that I won't try just for trying!

    Get a nice hammock that you can tote on your adventures...don't rush out and buy bug nets, rain tarps, underquilts, and all the other gizmos that hammock-hawkers claim you need...the hammock itself will pay dividends for years!

  2. #22
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    Well, keep in mind that you only tried one model, in your living room. ENOs have a following but no one claims that an ENO is the most comfortable hammock they've tried. And slap straps stretch b/c they're nylon instead of poly.

    It's cool that you gave it a try and don't feel like it works for you, at least not to sleep in...just asking that you keep in mind your sample size when drawing a conclusion about hammocking in general.

  3. #23
    Registered User wisenber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noah Genda View Post
    Get a nice hammock that you can tote on your adventures...don't rush out and buy bug nets, rain tarps, underquilts, and all the other gizmos that hammock-hawkers claim you need...the hammock itself will pay dividends for years!
    I might see questioning a "hammock-hawker" as that would be someone who sells hammock gear. The bugnets, tarps and quilts were recommended by hammock users not hammock sellers.

    My advice:
    1.) If you don't mind getting bitten by flying insects or having ticks visit you, don't bu a bug net.

    2.) If you have no desire to stay dry during a rain even while sleeping in your hammock, skip the tarp.

    3.) If you're not interested in the most comfortable way to stay warm in a hammock, don't even consider getting an underquilt.


    By following these simple bits of advice, you can maximize your chances of having a cold, wet or bug ridden night; and that's what hammock camping is really all about.

  4. #24
    Greetings Felllow Travelers SerenitySeeker's Avatar
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    Have the two of you ever used the two person hammock, or anyone else who are hammock users, do most couples use two person or individual hammocks? I hope to hike with a partner eventually and wonder about the comfort of sleeping two in the caccoon. I can see already i want the versatility of being able to use the hammock as a tent when necessary. Also any opinions on if the two person hammock is just too big for a single camper, or if say a 300 pound man would fit more comfortable in a two person hammock?

  5. #25

    Default Hammocks on the AT

    How easy is it to use a hammock at the shelters on the AT.

  6. #26
    Registered User Old Hiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbright View Post
    How easy is it to use a hammock at the shelters on the AT.
    On my section hikes from Springer to the NOC, there seemed to be plenty of space for hammocks. My Troop didn't stay too often at shelters, but I could have with my hammock with no problems.
    Old Hiker
    AT Hike 2012 - 497 Miles of 2184
    AT Thru Hiker - 29 FEB - 03 OCT 2016 2189.1 miles
    Just because my teeth are showing, does NOT mean I'm smiling.
    Hányszor lennél inkább máshol?

  7. #27
    1100+ miles down (2009), 1000+ miles to go (20??) RadioFreq's Avatar
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    Default Piece of cake

    Quote Originally Posted by dbright View Post
    How easy is it to use a hammock at the shelters on the AT.
    Last summer (2009) I did Springer to Duncannon with a hammock. I almost always hung near a shelter site. There's were always plenty of places to hang, usually far enough away from the shelter that late arrivals and early departures didn't disturb me.
    "When a man sits with a pretty girl for an hour, it seems like a minute.
    But let him sit on a hot stove for a minute--and it's longer than any hour.
    That's relativity." --Albert Einstein--

  8. #28
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    I recently managed to hang my hammock over a game trail and, over the course of the night, was visited repeatedly by a very confused moose. You bet I learned an important lesson that night!

  9. #29
    Registered User buzzamania's Avatar
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    Unless you live where there are no bugs don't buy any hammock without a bug netting (i.e. Eagle nest). There's no sleep for me when bugs are buzzing in my face and sucking the life blood out of me. Better to go with a Hennessy. I have 2.
    alifelongpursuit.blogspot.com

  10. #30

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    Just did my first trip with a Hammock sleep system. Didn't want to carry my half of a 6 lb pup tent. My son and I got a couple of $20 (w/ s&h) hammocks from Campmor and used a couple blue tarps for rain protection. I have to say they were very comfortable and dry. It did rain and i've had a wet floor in every tent i've used. My son and i stayed dry and comfortable. In the gear list it is mentioned a bug net. here in the NE, that is a necessity in the spring though not needed during my trip in September. Are there any suggestions for a reasonably priced bug net that can be added on to my existing hammock or should i just bite the bullet and buy one with the netting built in?

  11. #31
    Registered User Raul Perez's Avatar
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    Papa smurf over at www.mydiygear.com makes a bug sock.

  12. #32
    Registered User TechNaBill's Avatar
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    Tech-Na-Bill Here (First Post)
    Hennessy Hammock (HH) user and loving it. I had a homemade Tarp-Hammock-Shelter, but it had no bug net, and the freezing rain finally took my water proofing with it after 20 years of use. I loved my home made because it was attached on one side creating a pocket for putting stuff (My entire pack contents), and caused the air to circulate and trapped it so I stay toasty. The HH works well.

    I carry a 20 pound setup, just cannot seem to get it lighter.

    I have a Marmot Bag (Gore-Tex), first year they came out and it has saved my life 2 times when I fell in the river and had to use it to get dry (2 hours and I was damp dry).
    1 of those new silicone fabric poncho
    1 4oz umbrella
    1 Everware pot set (4oz, they don't make these any more. 1 cup and 1 pot with a lid. Perfect for everything.
    1 Titanium tea pot 5oz
    I use a isopropanol stove, usually carry 2 small refill tanks
    1 shower water bag that I cut down to just be a carrier with the drain head for washing
    1 universal tool
    2 small knives
    1 medium knife (sometimes a very light Stainless steel hatchet (just under 1 pound)
    A bag with Salt, pondered cheese, instant coffee tea bags, spoon, pot holder, and a small foot powder.
    A bag with my food (Dried broccoli, rise, noodles), I add the mice.
    A toilet bag with a homemade hammock sh^ter, paper, and a couple of sponges on a stick, in case I run out of paper.
    A Peg bag, 4 tent pegs, Hammock tree slings (So I don't hurt the trees), and some thin climbing rope.

    That is about it, and I still am 20 pounds, MAN! Oh well, I've done a lot of medium strip camping while hitch hiking in my younger days with a lot less.
    Just my 2 cents.
    Tech-Na-Bill
    >>
    Tech-Na-Bill

  13. #33

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    I'm an advisor to a Venture Crew (Boy scout unit, co-ed, ages 14-21) and most of our crew including leaders all use hammocks. We backpack quite often along the AT and other local trails in VA all year round. We have a variety of hammock types and methods of setting up in our crew. I use an ENO Double, with the straps and a light tarp that I use in a diamond shape. I like the double because it completely surrounds me in a cocoon even when I have my sleeping bag, mat and anything extra stashed in there. I absolutely love it. I am in my 40's with some back issues and find this way of sleeping provides the best rest and recovery for the next day's activities. I only go to a tent when hammocking is not an option. (Although I will admit to using my vehicle as one of the "trees" during one event where only one tree was available for use--arghhh!!!) I use a ThermoLite sleep mat for that extra layer of insulation when the temps dip low at night. My sleeping bag is a Cat's Meow (womans lite) to 20 degrees...when needed, I add a fleece liner and use a fleece hat/neck cover with cord around the face area to make a small opening just for the nose. When it is really cold, we heat up rocks in the campfire, wrap them in socks, camp towels or bandanas and place them in our sleeping bags. Think of the "old" days when bricks, irons or water bottles were warmed up and placed in bed covers to provide warmth.
    Bugs are sometimes an issue---saw the idea of using velcro to add mosquito netting....thinking of how I might modify my hammock for the upcoming summer's fun--heading west to Wyoming to hike in the Big Horn.
    One of our crew is completing her thru hike this year and used her hammock most of the way......she is an ultra light hiker and made several modifications to her straps and tarp.
    My uncle thru-hiked in 2005 and tried a hammock. he had an issue staying dry in rainy weather. I've been out in all kinds of weather, including severe wind and rain and for the most part, have been quite dry.......The times I did get wet were due to my own inexperience in setting up the tarp....I've learned the hard way how to set up, stay dry and stay warm.
    Hammock camping is definitely worth trying.....I do suggest talking to an experienced hammock camper and if possible, go out on the trail with them to see how and what they do.
    Venture Bear
    S.U.N.B.E.A.M. (Stop Untimely Notions Balance Energy And Motion)

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