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  1. #61
    Registered User orangebug's Avatar
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    One of the tricks of taping is to try to tape to dry clean skin whenever possible, or to overlap the tape onto itself when necessary. On the trail, it is easier to overlap than to assure you have a dry clean surface.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by orangebug
    One of the tricks of taping is to try to tape to dry clean skin whenever possible, or to overlap the tape onto itself when necessary. On the trail, it is easier to overlap than to assure you have a dry clean surface.
    These are very good points. I have had mixed success with overlapping both cloth and duct tape on the feet. But, the best success against heel blisters I have had has been switching from boots to trail runners.

  3. #63
    Registered User hammock engineer's Avatar
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    Finally reading this thread. I am reading this for ideas for a first aid kit. Not to get into the whole first aid kit argument. I do bring one to treat anything that doesn't need stickes or surgery. Want to keep small things from becoming big things.

    I did want to share something that worked well for me. Back in my rowing days I would constantly get blisters all over the palms of my hands. I found a cream that worked pretty well for blisters. I now use it as a general antiseptic. It is Corona (like the beer) antiseptic ointment. It is a cream developed for horses and cows. It helps the development of new skin and keep the blister from drying out. Worked really well for blisters on my hands and other general cuts. I got it at a local drug store. I heard that Target may have it, but I am not sure.

  4. #64
    Registered User Seeker's Avatar
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    yeah.... i've used it myself... great stuff... you can usually get it a feed stores too... never seen it at walmart/target... YMMV.

  5. #65
    Registered User CynJ's Avatar
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    http://www.coronaproducts.com/

    per their website you can find it at Petsmart and Tractor Supply
    ~CynJ

    "The reward of a thing well done is to have done it." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by orangebug
    I'm trying to figure out what about cutman11's note would result in an unhappy Happy or Smokeymntsteve's wrath.

    His point was to prepare for those events that one can control and treat on the trail. Cardiovascular events are rare, and significant ones are not something likely to be managed with anything other than evacuation of the victim to ER or a telemetry bed. Few places on the AT will accommodate that action in the Golden Hour. Mild MI's are routinely asymptomatic, unless arrhythmia complicates - in which case it isn't "mild."

    And why didn't the best cardiologist at St. Joe's carry aspirin in his pocket? At least he was a good choice of racketball partner.

    There are many illnesses and injuries to occur on the trail. HYOH, even if you feel you must carry a cardiac and trauma unit on your back. Yet, consider the possibility that knowledge of gear and skills in improvisation may be more valuable.
    I tend to disagree that cardiovascucular events are rare...as I hike North GA as you do...I find it the MOST COMMON death on the trail in the aging, as you and I!

    Aspirin was not carried in the cardiologist pocket, but he wishes he did, as the club did not have the sense to do so. As our great spokesman, Cutmans 11's has not responded... please explain why if cardiovascucular events are the highest death possibility on the trail for the aging... and I COULD DETERMINE what was wrong with ME and most anyone else... why would I NOT carry a couple of aspirin (multible uses) !

    By the way, that would be a couple of grams of weight at most (and I do believe in ultralite backpacking)...not a cardiac and trauma unit on my back!

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by orangebug
    If you have a sudden death on the AT, you are DRT (Dead Right There). CPR, aspirin and anything you could bring will not improve that reality. If you have angina, you need to stop, take the Aspirin, check a pulse for arrhythmia, and determine if you have the stamina left to evacuate yourself of send for help. Your trip is over until the ER clears you.

    BTW, I don't carry triple antibiotic cream. I have carried a roll of gauze, diaper creme, sunscreen, DEET, Polar Pure, and Pepto tabs. I also carry Naprosyn, and 2 tabs of my favorite opiate analgesic. All of the before mentioned are considered "comfort gear." My necessities include duct tape; Alcohol gel; I carry safety pins on my zippers. I wear clothing, use trekking poles and have a backpack. I think a cell phone is pretty pointless. I do not question the intelligence of those who feel other items are a necessary part of their gear.
    Take WHAT ASPIRIN ?...remember you ONLY have a cell phone and a hiking friend?

  8. #68
    Registered User orangebug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy
    Take WHAT ASPIRIN ?...remember you ONLY have a cell phone and a hiking friend?
    I'm not sure what prompted you to get so unhappy over a pretty old thread. I apologize for failing to mention that I carry aspirin as part of my daily medication. Ounce of prevention....

    I still contend that cardiovascular events are rare on the trail, but a very significant event when they occur. Similarly, plane crashes are rare, but have occurred in the past month. One deals with events the best they can, and works out means of evacuation when overwhelmed by these events.

  9. #69
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by orangebug
    I'm not sure what prompted you to get so unhappy over a pretty old thread. I apologize for failing to mention that I carry aspirin as part of my daily medication. Ounce of prevention....

    I still contend that cardiovascular events are rare on the trail, but a very significant event when they occur. Similarly, plane crashes are rare, but have occurred in the past month. One deals with events the best they can, and works out means of evacuation when overwhelmed by these events.
    I have not been on the site for sometime due to my wife's cancer, but wanted to respond to the "old thread". I am more than likely overesponding due to my personal experience, and my experience of hiking the North GA section of the trail. I know for a fact that for men over 50, it is not uncommon for heart attacks on the trail, especially in GA ! I have witnessed several bodies being taken down the mountain !

    In fact to my knowledge the only incidents of death, other than that in the past few years in this region, have been one death from a summer bag in January and a fall from a tree by a very experienced hiker in this age group.

    All other recent incidents were broken legs, etc. from younger hikers. I totally agree that most first aid kits are overstocked and unneeded but a few items, are rarely needed, but of comfort for you or others in those rare situations, I respect your experience in this field, and wish to close this thread and discussion, thanks!

  10. #70
    Registered User gumby's Avatar
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    While in the Air Force deployed with Special Ops we had Independent Medical Techicians with us. They are kind of a Super Paramedic and just under a Physicians Assistant in skills and what they could do. They had to take a kit that would work for many uses.

    For example, we all use duct tape for many uses right? Well they had to do the same. I had a friend come down with a really nasty case of fungus foot. He went to the medic to see what he could do. When he came back to our tent he siad to me, :Guess what he gave me"?. I said vagisil or monostat, he said yes how did you know. I explained that with the medical training I've had that what vagisil or monostat would be the optimum thing because they are both a form of a yeast like infection.

    Just goes to show that a first aid kit doesn't have to be very big, but it needs to adaptive. Now mine has some extra items in it. I get ingrown toenails quite often. I used to work for a Podatrist and helped while he removed them from patients. Since then I have done my own by using a pair of iris (kind of kind embroidery scissors) scissors and forceps. Hurts like hell for about 2 minutes then feels great.

    that's my $.02 worth

    BTW my buddy got a new nickname...we all started calling him Pu**y foot

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  11. #71
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    If you want to go cheap and ultralight, here's all you need:

    I micra-leatherman knife. Or just a small knife that has scissors and tweezers and a blade.

    Dental floss and Needle to sew up possible cuts and for gear repair, etc.

    Duct Tape for miscellaneous emergencies.

    Some Ibuprofen.

    Alcohol Hand Sanitizer.

    This "Kit" has served me well in over 2000 miles of hiking and I have rarely, if almost never had to borrow stuff from anyone else.
    <A HREF="http://www.jackielbolen.blogspot.com/"TARGET="Jackie's BLOG">http://www.jackielbolen.blogspot.com/</A>

  12. #72
    Section Hiker 500 miles smokymtnsteve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackiebolen
    If you want to go cheap and ultralight, here's all you need:

    I micra-leatherman knife. Or just a small knife that has scissors and tweezers and a blade.

    Dental floss and Needle to sew up possible cuts and for gear repair, etc.

    Duct Tape for miscellaneous emergencies.

    Some Ibuprofen.

    Alcohol Hand Sanitizer.

    This "Kit" has served me well in over 2000 miles of hiking and I have rarely, if almost never had to borrow stuff from anyone else.
    rarely or almost never..famous last words!
    "I'd rather kill a man than a snake. Not because I love snakes or hate men. It is a question, rather, of proportion." Edward Abbey

  13. #73
    Registered User cutman11's Avatar
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    I did not think my original post would raise such a controversy. I would like to thank orangebug for taking up my cause in my absence. I would agree with much of what was posted. I did not mean to come off as arrogant or "better than thee" in my post, but was trying to get across the idea of separating the comfort items. I carry the following items in my pack(30lb, fully stocked for 4 days), some of which can be construed as or used as "first aid items" : Duct tape, bandana, hiking poles, knife/leatherman type tool, safety pin, vaseline, chapstick, baby wipes, toilet tissue, compeed patches, aleve, tylenol, hand sanitizer, rope, iodine tabs, denatured alcohol. Most of those are for other uses, but could be helpful in a pinch. I also would agree with carrying a small tube of hydrocortisone creme, and a few benedryl tabs (like 4 pills, no more). If one is highly allergic to bee stings, an epipen would be appropriate too.

    The main thing is, that the minor stuff is minor because it doesnt get to be major stuff by not treating it for the day or two it takes to get to town. Im not saying go to town and pay a quack $300 to treat your scraped knee, but I am saying you can avoid carrying UNNECESSARY (meaning, take comfort stuff if you like, but it is not essential weight)stuff in the field, get it in town if you need it. The Major stuff is not treatable in the field,( by a non medically trained hiker or by a highly trained specialty MD) because it is too complex and would require too much stuff be carried to possibly treat it effectively, and delay in treatment could be deadly.

    The idea of carrying an aspirin is interesting, because I would venture to say that more people die walking around in Walmarts in the USA than on the AT, but I dont think the majority of people in the USA carry aspirin in their pockets everyday. The best thing to do if chest pain is experienced on the trail would be to immediately stop, take off the pack, lie down, and hopefully the pain (if angina) will subside. If you have someone with you, it would be sensible to have them get help, or help you get out of the woods as rapidly as possible (with or without the use of the unreliable cellphone) incorporating the idea of minimizing your physical activity as much as possible while getting out(drop the pack, walk rather than run, etc.) of the woods.
    Cutman
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  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by cutman11
    I did not think my original post would raise such a controversy. I would like to thank orangebug for taking up my cause in my absence. I would agree with much of what was posted. I did not mean to come off as arrogant or "better than thee" in my post, but was trying to get across the idea of separating the comfort items. I carry the following items in my pack(30lb, fully stocked for 4 days), some of which can be construed as or used as "first aid items" : Duct tape, bandana, hiking poles, knife/leatherman type tool, safety pin, vaseline, chapstick, baby wipes, toilet tissue, compeed patches, aleve, tylenol, hand sanitizer, rope, iodine tabs, denatured alcohol. Most of those are for other uses, but could be helpful in a pinch. I also would agree with carrying a small tube of hydrocortisone creme, and a few benedryl tabs (like 4 pills, no more). If one is highly allergic to bee stings, an epipen would be appropriate too.

    The main thing is, that the minor stuff is minor because it doesnt get to be major stuff by not treating it for the day or two it takes to get to town. Im not saying go to town and pay a quack $300 to treat your scraped knee, but I am saying you can avoid carrying UNNECESSARY (meaning, take comfort stuff if you like, but it is not essential weight)stuff in the field, get it in town if you need it. The Major stuff is not treatable in the field,( by a non medically trained hiker or by a highly trained specialty MD) because it is too complex and would require too much stuff be carried to possibly treat it effectively, and delay in treatment could be deadly.

    The idea of carrying an aspirin is interesting, because I would venture to say that more people die walking around in Walmarts in the USA than on the AT, but I dont think the majority of people in the USA carry aspirin in their pockets everyday. The best thing to do if chest pain is experienced on the trail would be to immediately stop, take off the pack, lie down, and hopefully the pain (if angina) will subside. If you have someone with you, it would be sensible to have them get help, or help you get out of the woods as rapidly as possible (with or without the use of the unreliable cellphone) incorporating the idea of minimizing your physical activity as much as possible while getting out(drop the pack, walk rather than run, etc.) of the woods.
    THIS IS WHAT I OBJECTED TO....most doctors advise for males over 50 to take an aspirin per day for prevention...I had a heart attack and have to do this, so for a week trip I take 7 aspirin...how much does that weigh ?

    In defense you say you carry a 30 pound pack fully stocked for four days...why? Read the "What's the weight of your big four ? " Adhere, and you will be able to carry a few extras and still be under your overweighed existing pack weight !

    NOW you STATE that you carry a FIRST AID KIT (and other uses) consisting of baby wipes and toilet paper...why both and not one...neither will save a life, yet serve the same purpose. Comfort Item ?

    We also carry compeed patches and a bandana...why both ? Comfort Item ?

    Vaseline and chapstick...why both ? Comfort Item ?

    Aleve and tylenol...why not just aspirin...dual purpose !

    Benedryl tablets...why ?...use the cell phone or you will be in town in a couple of days...NO MEDICAL EMERGENCY ! Comfort item ?

    If minor stuff is minor, and it only takes a day or so to go into town...why do you take the stuff you carry... and why do you object to ME, with prior heart attack history, taking a few aspirin...and my pack weight lower than yours to begin with ?

  15. #75
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    To lighten this heavy thread...all be it very interesting.
    I would like to add...I LOVE comfort and a hot toddy might help.


  16. #76
    Michael + Laura Ryan justusryans's Avatar
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    I like beer.
    "We wanderers, ever seeking the lonelier way, begin no day where we have ended another day; and no sunrise finds us where sunset left us."

    Kahlil Gibran

  17. #77
    Registered User orangebug's Avatar
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    I don't think anyone is objecting to your choices of gear. Cutman and I simply let this list know a bit about how we put together/consider our first aid gear. I do not count routine medications, including Aspirin for prevention of platlet clumping, as a part of my first aid kit. Of course, it is as I would "donate" an aspirin to an apparent mild MI or angina victim.

    For analgesia, there are good reasons to prefer a combination of Tylenol and Aleve over aspirin for first aid kits, given allergies and GI bleed risks common with Aspirin. Yet it is pretty simple to carry a small tin of ASA tabs. There are many reasons to carry comfort items including baby wipes and TP.

    There are few good reasons to carry non-comfort items, such as anger.

  18. #78
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
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    One thought, and one question.

    With safety in mind, I have added a pencil stub to my "first aid kit". My thought is that there might come a time when leaving a note in the middle of the trail, or at a shelter, or at a junction might be of some value.

    Now my question. I have a few Tylenol IIIs left over from the dentist, and was considering adding these to my kit- specifically to help me sleep better if I strain something or have ache or such. Is this dumb? My thought is that since they aren't all that powerfull, I wouldn't be masking pain to the point that I wouldn't be listening to my body as well as I should. Any real down side? Also, I have a bunch of Cipro (prescription antibiotic) I might add, but they are more than a year old. Dumb?
    Last edited by rickb; 12-15-2005 at 11:27.

  19. #79
    First Sergeant SGT Rock's Avatar
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    Anyone with a medical condition should bring meds for the appropriate uses. If an older person needs to take an aspirin a day, then he/she should by all means carry it, but on the flip side, I don't think I need to add it to my pack on the off chance I may run into someone hiking that might be having a heart attack and my extra aspirin may just be the trick. If you follow that sort of logic then I could also carry an IV and catheter in case I meet up with someone dehydrated or a defibulator for lightning strike victims - the major two life threatening things that I see as problems on the trail.

    And, as I understand it, this a daily preventative anyway - if I run into someone having a heat attack, getting them off the mountain and knowing CPR will probably be more important than trying to give someone in the processes of having one a couple of aspirin anyway.

    Seems this argument should be more about adding what the individual needs based on their own medical issues rather than what everyone should carry for the off chance they could help someone with their daily therapy.
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  20. #80
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hana_Hanger
    To lighten this heavy thread...all be it very interesting.
    I would like to add...I LOVE comfort and a hot toddy might help.

    =================================
    Exactly why my first aid kit includes a 4oz bottle of Jack Daniels ...for medicinal purposes only, of course !!

    'Slogger
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

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