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  1. #41
    Peakbagger Extraordinaire The Solemates's Avatar
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    My ZPack has over 3000 miles on it and no durability issues to date. And I often sling mine on the ground, sit on it during rest breaks, and generally provide no extra care to it. what are these hikers doing that their packs are lasting so little time?!
    The only thing better than mountains, is mountains where you haven't been.

    amongnature.blogspot.com

  2. #42
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    Bulldog--

    You are correct; most of the complaints were about the G.....however, the Z still made some folks unhappy. Quite a few folks switched out from the Z to the Vapor Trail.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by spunky
    I have used a Golite Speed for the past three years. I have had it on the trail for as much as three weeks at a time and carried 30-32 pounds. I have been satisfied with it. It does feel a little better when the weight is down to 25-28 pounds, but it will carry 30+ without killing my shoulders (or pack).
    Everyone's different, but I do not think an average person would be comfortable with 30 pounds in a Race/Speed. Even under optimal conditions it transfers very little weight to the hips. When I would unbuckle the hip belt (like before taking it off) I felt maybe a 10-20% change in weight on my shoulders. So, durability of the pack aside (and you could easily have a blow-out at less than 30 pounds), most of the weight is on your shoulders, and most people cannot carry 25+ pounds on their shoulders comfortably.

    I am 5'9" 140 pounds, and the Race becomes uncomfortable for me past 20 lbs., the most I've carried in it being 25.

  4. #44
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    Jack, You questioned the durability of my Mountainsmith Auspex in Hot Springs last year. After finishing, it is as good as new, but that's because Mountainsmith replaced it because it had excess wear. I still think the Auspex is worth consideration. The table only lists a couple of packs between 3 and 5.5 lbs, and I do not think any of the lighter packs handle 40 lb as well as the Auspex.

    BTW. Jack, Have you posted your plans for this year? I will be at Springer 4/6.

  5. #45
    Yellow Jacket
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARambler
    and I do not think any of the lighter packs handle 40 lb as well as the Auspex.
    FWIW, the GG Nimbus Ozone can handle 40# and comes in at 3#. It could easily do 50# if you can fit 50# in the pack.

    If you don't think you can do a sub-2# pack (Six Moon Designs, Vapor Trail, Maraposa, P1, Fusion, etc.), the GG Nimbus Ozone is probably the best 3# pack on the market (several size hipbelts and shoulder straps available, and a fully adjustable torso length, very few "useless" dead weight features, etc.). Unless, of course, you want a seprate sleeping bag compartment. But, then, how many sub-4# packs have separate sleeping bag compartments?

    GG even makes an add-on top-lid pocket (not a pouch like most lids), for those who feel they need a little bit of "built-in" organization from their packs.
    Yellow Jacket -- Words of Wisdom (tm) go here.

  6. #46
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    1. I don't own shares in the company.
    2. Everyone has their own preferences, with packs or anything else. I've had
    great luck with Ospreys going back at least a decade now.
    3. My comments on other packs (Go-Lites, Gregory Z's, etc.) are based on
    first-hand, eyewitness experience. I've either seen people have bad luck
    with some of these items, or I've had to deal with them as an employee at
    an Outfitter. In almost every case, without exception, the hiker was
    either unaware of the specs/limits on the pack; or WAS aware and
    overpacked it anyway, causing subsequent problems, i.e. the packs blew
    out. Long-distance hikers should avoid "liteweight" packs (i.e packs
    rated to 30 poiunds or less) unless they are willing to be extremely diligent
    about what they're carrying; if one goes "over the limit" for any length of
    time with these backpacks, it will most likely result in destruction of the
    pack. Most hikers exceed the specs/limits on their packs; some do this
    to a ridiculous degree. If you insist on putting forty-two pounds of s***
    in a 28-pound bag you're gonna have problems, and soon.

  7. #47
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    Above comment was mistakenly made to a question asked much earlier in the thread about whether I was biased towards Osprey Packs. Answer is, no I'm not, it's just a personal preference; that being said, I think my comments about long-distance hiker abuse of their gear (and of the companies that make it, when they demand or expect refunds/replacements of abused gear)
    is fair and accurate.

  8. #48
    Registered User LivAndLetLive's Avatar
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    Default packs for women

    Does anyone have any suggestions for packs for thru-hiking women?

  9. #49
    Registered User hopefulhiker's Avatar
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    not necessarily for women but the chart did not include the Luxury Lite pack which is a viable choice for a thru hiker pack.. I used one in 2005. It weighs around 2 lbs, is external, modular and has a front pack.. luxurylite.com

  10. #50
    Registered User cutman11's Avatar
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    After looking at the table, it seems to me that my original decision to go with the ULA P-2 still holds up. For its weight, it generally holds more and carries more weight comfortably than the others with comparable weights. I have yet to hear anyone have any negative comments about it, other than its heavier than the smaller size packs that can only carry less weight comfortably. It allows a bit of "margin for error" or flexibility if you will, in the volume and weight carried for long distance hiking that I feel outweighs the slightly higher weight. And besides, mine has "CUTMAN" sewn right onto the outside lower left corner!!
    Cutman
    GA>ME 2000>2010..... Purist thruhiker in spirit, just with a lotta zeros during townstops;)

  11. #51
    Registered User SunnyWalker's Avatar
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    What about Kelti packs?
    -SunnyWalker
    "Something hidden. Go and find it. Go, and look behind the Ranges. Something lost behind the Ranges. Lost and waiting for you . . . Go!" (Rudyard Kipling)
    From SunnyWalker, SOBO CDT hiker starting June 2014.
    Please visit: SunnyWalker.Net

  12. #52
    GA - Central PA 1977
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    Boy there`s some real junk on there...A one pound 4,600 cubic inch pack for $90??????...Looks like an oversized stuff sack with some shoulder straps..I bet 30 pounds feels like 50 in that thing..The same 30 pounds would feel like 20 in a 4 pound pack of equal cubic inches
    Sometimes you can't hear them talk..Other times you can.
    The same old cliches.."Is that a woman or a man?"
    You always seem out-numbered..You don't dare make a stand.

  13. #53
    Springfieldjones
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    You guys are spoiled using fancy named packs. We need special packs if we are pushing the limit, but most of us are not. I am still using my Kelty frame Gerry pack for open trail hiking. I have yet to beat it's comfort and ease. I replaced some of the old straps with new lighter ones and it weighs in at about 5.5 lbs. It carries 30 to 45 lbs, depending on the season and it never breaks or rips.

  14. #54
    Registered User Egads's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Programbo View Post
    Boy there`s some real junk on there...A one pound 4,600 cubic inch pack for $90??????...Looks like an oversized stuff sack with some shoulder straps..I bet 30 pounds feels like 50 in that thing..The same 30 pounds would feel like 20 in a 4 pound pack of equal cubic inches
    I happen to have this pack. It's a great pack for UL backpacking and taking care of your down bag / quilt / jacket. Gossamer Gear make great niche products for those of us who want to conserve our energy for the trail.

    Egads
    The trail was here before we arrived, and it will still be here when we are gone...enjoy it now, and preserve it for others that come after us

  15. #55
    Registered User Capt.Scott's Avatar
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    Default Changed recently to Internal frame

    Anybody tried Deuter? Nice packs.

  16. #56
    Yellow Jacket
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt.Scott View Post
    Anybody tried Deuter? Nice packs.
    My kid uses a Fox 30, well built. But a bit over the top with too many useless features (too may pockets, pockets that are more for looks than function, etc.).
    Last edited by tlbj6142; 02-13-2008 at 10:14.
    Yellow Jacket -- Words of Wisdom (tm) go here.

  17. #57
    Yellow Jacket
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    Quote Originally Posted by springfieldjones View Post
    You guys are spoiled using fancy named packs. We need special packs if we are pushing the limit,
    A thru-hike is "pushing the limits". And frankly, why would you want to carry a 5.5# pack, when a 2# pack will do? That 3.5# difference is almost 2qts of water. I don't know about you, but on my longer trips, adding 1 additional qt of water to my pack is quite noticeable.
    Yellow Jacket -- Words of Wisdom (tm) go here.

  18. #58
    Savoring Happy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlbj6142 View Post
    A thru-hike is "pushing the limits". And frankly, why would you want to carry a 5.5# pack, when a 2# pack will do? That 3.5# difference is almost 2qts of water. I don't know about you, but on my longer trips, adding 1 additional qt of water to my pack is quite noticeable.
    Tony, I'd argue the point that the AT is "pushing the limits" but I won't because everyone has their own preception of what " the limits " are. I've got to agree with Jack that a modified Osprey is hard to beat for comfort and durability. I did the UL routine for several years and the Spartan existance it demands detracts from the over all quality of the trek, in my opinion. I would much rather carry an extra 10lbs and enjoy myself than to carry a UL load and feel like I'm in survival mode all the time. I use a modified Osprey Exposure 66 and have had no regrets. It expands to 4200 for the days after resupply but cinchs down and retains it's balance once the viddles, fuel, and H2O disappears. I've modified it to weigh just under four lbs and even if I were to carry an extra 2 liters of water it would be allot more comfortable than my ULs because the weight is on my heat molded waist belt and not between my shoulders. I carried a UL (Go Lite) pack on the Northern New Mexico portion of the CDT and always had sore thumbs for several days after resupply from holding them under my shoulder straps. Went back to a belted, stay supported pack and have never looked back. Your 2lb Ul is probably all you need when you're hiking a "park trail" and only 4 days from your closest resupply or cache but I'd still prefer the comfort of a suspension pack.

    Savor Happy!
    DragonAss

  19. #59
    Yellow Jacket
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Belay View Post
    Tony, I'd argue the point that the AT is "pushing the limits" but I won't because everyone has their own preception of what " the limits " are.
    Not in terms of personal limits. But for a pack (and most gear) a thru-hike is pushing the limits and well outside the bounds of what most gear is designed to handle.
    Yellow Jacket -- Words of Wisdom (tm) go here.

  20. #60
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    Default Vapor Trail

    So, would it be agreed that the Vapor Trail is a great pack for a thru-hiker?

    Is this considered (by hikers here) to be an ultra-light pack, and how many days of food can one expect to support with this pack? (clearly gear dependent question, but generalize)

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