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  1. #61
    Donating Member/AT Class of 2003 - The WET year
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    Quote Originally Posted by YerbaJon
    A great alternative to soy milk (soy juice) is oat milk. It is the same price and unlike soy, which tastes kinda' like milk, the oat milk tastes better than milk. It works wonders with cereal, in teas, alone as a glass, etc.
    ========================
    Never heard of oat milk. Is is sold commercially or do you make it yourself ?

    'Slogger
    The more I learn ...the more I realize I don't know.

  2. #62
    Registered User Moxie00's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Footslogger
    ========================
    Never heard of oat milk. Is is sold commercially or do you make it yourself ?

    'Slogger
    I tried milking an oat, got a little milk but it was hardly worth the effort and the oat didn't like oit one bit and kicked me twice.

  3. #63

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    1. Snack, Snack, SNACK! See Table 2 below for Snacks ranked by carbohydrate content.
    The correct link for the Table 2 in the Thru-Hiker article is now:

    http://thru-hiker.com/articles/PackL...cks.htm#table2

    And the link to Newb's article on greens along the trail is gone. There may be a reason for this but I'm not aware of it. Age of the post?
    Art
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  5. #65
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    50 grams of Yerba Mate is a HUGE amount of caffeine. It has between 0.3% and 1.7% caffeine by weight, about the same as tea. This is like drinking 25 cups of tea or 10 cups of coffee. Mate seems to affect me a bit less than tea, but this is drinking 500 milligrams of caffeine!! It seems unwise to drink that much caffeine. The caffeine in mate is just plain old caffeine.

    Much of the rest of the advice in this article is good.

  6. #66

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    Hello. I would like to edit this article to improve it for the community. How would you like me to do that? YerbaJon

  7. #67

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    Include SPAM recipes. . . .

  8. #68
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    Include this pie chart?

    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
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    The true harvest of my life is intangible...a little stardust caught,a portion of the rainbow I have clutched -Thoreau

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  10. #70
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    The conversation about Yerba Mate intrigues me. The special straw (bombilla) has a screen to strain the liquid from the leaves, but why not just use a hemp or cheese cloth 'tea bag'?

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by YerbaJon View Post
    You are mostly correct. There are 2 types: One is like two spoons put together with small holes drilled in them. The other type is a straight hollow tube that has larger holes drilled in the side of it that are covered with a spring which acts like a screen. The straw creates a reverse french press. After adding water, the tea compacts tightly around the end (bottom/screen part) of the spoon One has to suck the nutrients out, so the straw surrounded by the packed tea allows one to suck out the nutrients (which includes protein!).
    Instead of using the special straw, could you just brew the Yerba Mate in a hemp or cheesecloth 'tea' bag?

  12. #72
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    never thought i'd see yerba mate referrenced on this site, but you are very right that is a great drink! i learned to love it while living in Argentina, where they drink it religiously, its definitely considered a very healthy practice over there. i was actually thinking about taking some with me on my thru-hike but haven't decided yet. i actually found a silicone mate gourd while i was over there and picked one up, its very light, easy to clean and squishy (plus the bombilla it comes w/is small and light) however i don't know how you would get one here in the states

  13. #73
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    .........................

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    Trollin' trollin'trollin, keep them doggie's........................

  15. #75
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    Dried parsley is an excellent source of vitamins A and C, and minerals Iron and Calcium. You can add quite a bit to your daily lentil and vegetable soup, or whatever. I would suggest total herbs up to an ounce a day, but more mild and nutritious herbs can make up the bulk of them. Sure, some vitamin A and C is lost in the drying process, but it has alot to begin with, so enough is retained.

  16. #76
    Registered User Grinch's Avatar
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    http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-li...e/faq-20058343


    I like yerba mate and have thought about bringing some for my spring 500+ miler. What do you think of this article?

  17. #77
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    This thread has made me very curious, and, have just ordered some mate!

  18. #78
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    Excellent guide, thank you.

  19. #79
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    When clicking this thread I expected more focused info on yerba mate rather than general nutrition.

    From the first page: "Quinoa, it is worth noting, is called the "mother-grain" as almonds are the "mother-nut". Most hikers have almonds on their menu, but the Quinoa has been skipped. (see university of minnissota for good over-view: http://www.wholegrain.umn.edu/grains/quinoa.cfm). Quinoa makes great trail food. Quinoa would be a grain. In some forms Quinoa is a complete protein (the only grain that is a complete protein); unfortunately most Quinoa available in the US has had the outer shell removed, thus it is missing a few of the amino-acids. Therefore, treat most Quinoa as just a super healthy, easy to prepare on the trail, highly adaptable to different flavors, vegetarians dream grain."

    Some sources mistakenly define quinoa as a pseudo grain especially in the U.S. among Foodie types. Quinoa is actually a seed...not a grain.

    Quinoa is NOT the only compete vegetarian protein source.

    Those who don't eat meat have little to no difficulty getting their complete protein. There are many examples of successful vegetarian and Vegan professional athletes, Olympic athletes, body builders, Ultra runners, LD hikers, etc.

    There is a misconception about complete proteins...That is, you have to get it all the essential amino acids and in individual proper amino acid amounts in one food or in one meal. NOT TRUE. These are amino acids we have to get from outside sources. Even carnivores may not get adequate amounts of all their amino acids from one meat source or in one meal. They consume broadly. Just as vegetarians or Vegans can do in their own way. Getting enough complete protein is rather easy in the U.S. when eating a wide ranging diet whether an omnivore, carnivore, or herbivore. One does not have to focus on complete proteins as much as Nutritionism advocates or those in the food industry or others commonly advocate. A meal as simple as brown rice and beans, hummus and pita, hempseed, buckwheat(not a wheat)/SOBA noodles, and seitan(from soy) are complete proteins.

  20. #80
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    Commonly known as yerba mate, a member of the holly genus Ilex, is native to S America. It is a staple in the area around Paraguay and other S American areas from which it gets its botanical species name. Yerba mate(Ilex paraguariensis) is not the only holly species with substantial amounts of caffeine in the leaves though. Ilex guayusa, another S American native, contains caffeine. There is a company also called Guayusa that sells this species. Here in the US we have our own native holly - Yaupon Holly(I. vomitoria) - quite common in the ornamental landscape trade on the east coast and specifically abundant in the southeast. Some varieties range further north into PA. All the straight species I've had. We used to make Yaupon Holly tea in FL. All the species are very "green", earthy tasting. It is considered a "health" drink. These are not the only hollies with caffeine but these are the most known because the caffeine content is highest, as far as I know.

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