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  1. #21
    Registered User Tennessee Viking's Avatar
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    I think the only book for the BMT only goes north to the Ocoee/Hiawasee area.
    ''Tennessee Viking'
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    Falls Lake Trail: 2011

  2. #22

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    The BMTA has a new 2nd Edition databook available. It is available at a number of outfitters including REI in Atlanta, Rock creek in Chattanooga, and elsewhere. It makes a fine companion to the Nat Geo maps.
    'All my lies are always wishes" ~Jeff Tweedy~

  3. #23
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    Has the BMTA included Mr. Parkay's maps by any chance?

  4. #24

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    Unfortunately, they have not.
    'All my lies are always wishes" ~Jeff Tweedy~

  5. #25
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    Yes. There is nothing so lovely as a tree.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Viking View Post
    I think the only book for the BMT only goes north to the Ocoee/Hiawasee area.
    I find it hard to believe that Homan would publish a book on hiking the BMT and not cover the whole trail. What was he thinking? So, much of it is missing. Why not wait until the trail was finished(July 2005), and then write the book?

  7. #27
    Registered User Gladiator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    I find it hard to believe that Homan would publish a book on hiking the BMT and not cover the whole trail. What was he thinking? So, much of it is missing. Why not wait until the trail was finished(July 2005), and then write the book?

    M-O-N-E-Y?

    Probably wasn't Homan's original or primary motivation, but it stands to reason that you could generate a lot more revenue by publishing a 2nd edition with the latest info on the newest sections of the trail. People will buy anything, and there's nothing wrong with trying to earn an honest buck.

  8. #28
    Registered User Tennessee Viking's Avatar
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    It is a pretty good book. Goes in a bit of detail for each section of its flora, fauna, and history. But just to go halfway, not fair. Go all the way to Newfound man.
    ''Tennessee Viking'
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  9. #29
    Trail miscreant Bearpaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Viking View Post
    It is a pretty good book. Goes in a bit of detail for each section of its flora, fauna, and history. But just to go halfway, not fair. Go all the way to Newfound man.
    Actually, Homan's book only goes 1/3 of the way. And it would have to go all the way to Davenport or you're short-changing the final 34 miles.

    But seriously, the original book served a good purpose. It was the only source out there for maps of the "original" BMT from Springer to the Ocoee. I hiked it before all the rest was complete. I was glad to have those maps.

    Now, with the data book and the Nat'l Geo Maps (Cherokee NF and Great Smoky Mountains NP), there's no need for a guidebook. You can fill in the details with Mr. Parkay's profile maps if you're into that and there are a handful of other bits of useful information on the net, but really the basics are what the BMT is about. No shelters, few fellow hikers, fewer blazes, and no need for guidebooks.
    If people spent less time being offended and more time actually living, we'd all be a whole lot happier!

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearpaw View Post
    Actually, Homan's book only goes 1/3 of the way. And it would have to go all the way to Davenport or you're short-changing the final 34 miles.

    But seriously, the original book served a good purpose. It was the only source out there for maps of the "original" BMT from Springer to the Ocoee. I hiked it before all the rest was complete. I was glad to have those maps.

    Now, with the data book and the Nat'l Geo Maps (Cherokee NF and Great Smoky Mountains NP), there's no need for a guidebook. You can fill in the details with Mr. Parkay's profile maps if you're into that and there are a handful of other bits of useful information on the net, but really the basics are what the BMT is about. No shelters, few fellow hikers, fewer blazes, and no need for guidebooks.
    Actually, good first section maps were available from the BMTA long before Homan's book came out and when I joined the BMTA I got a series of 11 maps from Springer Mt/Three Forks all the way to Double Spring Gap and the Ocoee River. Maps were also available on the BMTA website for free download.

  11. #31

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    Bearpaw is 100% correct. The Nat Geo maps and the databaook are all a hiker really needs. Mr Parkay's profile maps are gravy.

    You really do have to know how to read a map on the BMT. It is not a superhighway with signage at most every trail junction like the AT.
    'All my lies are always wishes" ~Jeff Tweedy~

  12. #32
    Registered User Ewker's Avatar
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    I have the first BMT data book they put out last yr or the yr before. How much difference is there between it and the 2nd edition book?
    Conquest: It is not the Mountain we conquer but Ourselves

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ewker View Post
    I have the first BMT data book they put out last yr or the yr before. How much difference is there between it and the 2nd edition book?
    Not too much. There was a major relo in GA around Licklog and Wallalah Mountains. There were also a few minor corrections. The first edition would be fine to use for a hike on the BMT.
    'All my lies are always wishes" ~Jeff Tweedy~

  14. #34
    Registered User Ewker's Avatar
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    thanks for the info
    Conquest: It is not the Mountain we conquer but Ourselves

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by MOWGLI View Post
    Bearpaw is 100% correct. The Nat Geo maps and the databaook are all a hiker really needs. Mr Parkay's profile maps are gravy.

    You really do have to know how to read a map on the BMT. It is not a superhighway with signage at most every trail junction like the AT.
    I didn't know the Nat. GEO maps covered the GA section?

  16. #36
    Trail miscreant Bearpaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by take-a-knee View Post
    I didn't know the Nat. GEO maps covered the GA section?
    The Springer and Cohutta map covers most, if not all, of that portion. Though the point I was making is that there is no need to expand on the guidebook for the TN and Smokies portions of the BMT.
    If people spent less time being offended and more time actually living, we'd all be a whole lot happier!

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by take-a-knee View Post
    I didn't know the Nat. GEO maps covered the GA section?
    They just came out with updated maps. The trail is neon yellow, like it is on the Tennessee maps.
    'All my lies are always wishes" ~Jeff Tweedy~

  18. #38

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    Be a bit wary of the free maps on the BMT website. They don't tend to show forest service roads. This means that if you miss a turn off of a forest service road, you'll have a much harder time determining from a compass reading if you're still on the trail or not. In the end, it would probably add no more than a mile at each missed junction for a typical hiker, but that can add up fast. It's extremely easy to miss a turn off a road when the trail is not consistently blazed.

    The maps also don't show many major roads. In the event of an emergency, you might miss an easy hitch out for help simply because the road wasn't marked on the map. And if you need to hitch or blue blaze to avoid the fords, (in wet weather, there is at least 1 very dangerous one outside the Smokies) you'll have a tough time figuring out where to go, much less which roads have low water bridges. In the smokies, a careful study of the $1 park trail map provides enough information to blue blaze around the dangerous wet weather fords without hitting other fords, but the lack of topo markings could encourage someone to green blaze. I don't know if this is possible, but a quick study of my old AT map encouraged me to risk the fords instead green blazing. If I had to hike it again in the same conditions, I would take a 10 mile unmarked blue-blaze.

  19. #39

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    Sorry you had problems Bati. As the Publicity Director for the BMTA, I would always encourage folks to hike with the Nat Geo maps for the Chattahoochee, the Cherokee, and the Smokies. The databook is a nice companion to those maps.
    'All my lies are always wishes" ~Jeff Tweedy~

  20. #40
    a.k.a "the vagabond" Diamond Diggs's Avatar
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    how important is having a compass on the BMT

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