Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 36 of 36
  1. #21

    Default Down best if you can keep your bag dry

    I think it's fair to say that the more experienced the backpacker, the more likely they are to use a down sleeping bag. (As usual, there are exceptions.)

    And if down gear is damp-especially in a humid climate-it will take a great deal of time to dry.

    Actually, I think damp down dries pretty well. Wet, as in clumped down, will take forever to dry. I guess. I never got my down bag wet in the wild. It takes a lot of water, not just condensation or a few drips, to get a down bag soaked.

    Pick a good campsite where water won't pool, line your stuff sack with an oven bag or a trash compactor bag, and just be careful to keep your down bag dry. If you do, down wins handily.

  2. #22
    Registered User Bags4266's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-01-2009
    Location
    Holland, NJ
    Age
    57
    Posts
    895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Colter View Post
    I think it's fair to say that the more experienced the backpacker, the more likely they are to use a down sleeping bag. (As usual, there are exceptions.)

    And if down gear is damp-especially in a humid climate-it will take a great deal of time to dry.

    Actually, I think damp down dries pretty well. Wet, as in clumped down, will take forever to dry. I guess. I never got my down bag wet in the wild. It takes a lot of water, not just condensation or a few drips, to get a down bag soaked.

    Pick a good campsite where water won't pool, line your stuff sack with an oven bag or a trash compactor bag, and just be careful to keep your down bag dry. If you do, down wins handily.

    "More Experienced" Please. I made a hiker quilt out of 3.7 combat, 1.1 rip, good to 40* weighs 1lb on the nose packs to a small football. Beats any down price wise. Of course not pack wise. But during the warmer seasons my pack has more than enough room. When something of down can beat that for $54.00 let me know

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-12-2007
    Location
    Mt Rainier, WA
    Age
    55
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Decided to try an experiment of my own last year with 2 equally rated bags- one down, and one synthetic.....THe down- a Marmot 20F bag, and the Synthetic, a NorthFace 20F. Both are considered good bags, or so I've read. Temps were sposed to be in the mid 30sF that nite, no significant weather.
    Well folks, by the time about 2 am rolled around, I was digging for my down bag- I was FREEZING in the North Face bag. Gratefully, I crawled into my Marmot bag, and snuggled in, warm and toasty for the rest of the nite.
    And since I know your sleeping pad has alot to do with it, I was sleeping on an Exped7 Downmat, regular length, as I'm a side sleeper.

    My lesson learned? My freezin butt will be taking a down bag on my trips, and will be making sure it stays D R Y. A dry sack and doubled with a trash bag or 2, should do the job, as long as one is careful about things, I think. Ive used my synthetic 3 times,on short trips, and it already shows signs of clumping in places. Yuk. My down bags-both of them, look and act like new. Just my 2 cents.

  4. #24

    Default

    Many say the Wiggy synthetic sleeping bags do not clump. Anyone have experience?

    I have heard synthetic insulations is better, recently.

    I am trying to decide between down and synthetic, again, this time for a quilt.

  5. #25
    Registered User LIhikers's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-01-2004
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Age
    66
    Posts
    2,234
    Images
    1

    Default

    I've used a Wiggy's bag in temperatures that went to 25 below zero and was nice and warm as well as comfortable. The bag belonged to the lodge where I did a 5 day dog sled camping trip and was a vital part of their business. I'd bet it had hundreds of nights of use and was still doing it's job well. I was told that it was rated for 65 below zero. You could never use the thing for backpacking as it was just too heavy and bulky. We just laid them out flat on the dog sleds.
    Wiggy may have other models of sleeping bag available, I don't know.

  6. #26
    Registered User Raul Perez's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-24-2009
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Age
    39
    Posts
    590
    Images
    4

    Default

    very nice article thanks for the info

  7. #27

    Default

    Good information. I have down for cold weather. For warmer camping I have a 30 degree down but recently purchased a 30 degree synthetic because it is a bit lighter and wetness will not be an issue. I always double bag the sleeping bag in my pack, just in case.

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-09-2009
    Location
    Burnside Ky - Big South Fork
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Thanks for posting all the information!

    I purchased a Marmot Atom 40 Degree Down Sleeping Bag and love it. It's an 850+ down, stuffs smaller than football, and weighs a little over 1 pound. I haven't even had it zipped all the way up yet, although I normally get cold sleeping.

    I'll be in the market for a zero down bag later in the year to replace my synthetic zero bag.

  9. #29
    A♣ K♣ Q♣ J♣ 10♣ Luddite's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-12-2010
    Location
    Telluride, CO
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,407
    Images
    16

    Default

    Down definitely Wins.
    Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit, and as vital to our lives as water and good bread.
    -Edward Abbey

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-10-2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Age
    28
    Posts
    73

    Default

    if you care at all about weight and packability, down is the clear answer. if youre into being "bomb proof" then yeah, down isnt the right choice.

  11. #31
    white blazes, magic places northernstorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2010
    Location
    cold spring, NY
    Age
    37
    Posts
    93

    Default

    Nice article. I'm a down fan though.

  12. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-18-2007
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    1,610
    Images
    36

    Default

    I don't see how synthetic could possibly win, pure weight issue. at 60 degrees, different story, cold out? Down, weight rules here. Maybe "technology" will catch up in time

  13. #33

    Default

    The only real benefit to me for synthetic is it dries faster.
    In a constantly wet environment like the pacific northwest I would prefer synthetic or in summer anywhere.

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-19-2010
    Location
    North Lauderdale, FL
    Age
    57
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I would like to make my own could you explain more please?

  15. #35

    Default

    Miriam,

    If you want to make your own, I would suggest starting with a quilt with a boxed foot and build it out of Climasheild.

    Its easy to work with and you only have to sew it on the edges. For fabric hit the local Walmart and you might luck out and find some 1.1 oz DWR ripstop. I found some a while back for $1.50 per yard.

    If you cant find that go to Thruhiker and get some .9 oz nylon there. The taffetta is supposed to be really comfy.

    http://thru-hiker.com/materials/breathable.php

    Use 2.5 oz Climasheild for summer and about 50dF
    3.7 oz for 40dF
    5 oz for 30dF
    Etc
    They are out of 2.5 oz right now.
    http://thru-hiker.com/materials/insulation.php

    If you do a drawstring footbox its pretty easy.
    A real footbox is a little more difficult but not too bad

    Basically just sew a shell inside out, edge stich on the climasheild,
    turn it right side out and close it up.

    If you want to build a down sleeping bag or quilt its a lot more work
    with boxed channels etc.
    I have worked with down before and its messy.

  16. #36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tammons View Post
    Miriam,

    If you want to make your own, I would suggest starting with a quilt with a boxed foot and build it out of Climasheild.

    Its easy to work with and you only have to sew it on the edges. For fabric hit the local Walmart and you might luck out and find some 1.1 oz DWR ripstop. I found some a while back for $1.50 per yard.

    If you cant find that go to Thruhiker and get some .9 oz nylon there. The taffetta is supposed to be really comfy.

    http://thru-hiker.com/materials/breathable.php

    Use 2.5 oz Climasheild for summer and about 50dF
    3.7 oz for 40dF
    5 oz for 30dF
    Etc
    They are out of 2.5 oz right now.
    http://thru-hiker.com/materials/insulation.php

    If you do a drawstring footbox its pretty easy.
    A real footbox is a little more difficult but not too bad

    Basically just sew a shell inside out, edge stich on the climasheild,
    turn it right side out and close it up.

    If you want to build a down sleeping bag or quilt its a lot more work
    with boxed channels etc.
    I have worked with down before and its messy.
    I just buy a sleeping bag and convert it to a quilt. I dropped probably 4-6 oz off my sleeping bag doing this.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •