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  1. #21

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    T.T. makes fine gear hands down.But to use tyvek that builders in the USA use to cover homes but in lite grade for tents and then go to sil,just dont get it.

  2. #22
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    Oh I see...
    There are 16 different types of Tyvek, the one that HS is using is the clothing grade Tyvek, so nothing to do with wall insulation.
    I know that some pretend that one shelter can do it all but you may notice that around the world people use different style clothes and fabrics to cope better with their weather. For example the much maligned cotton happens to work very well in the desert.
    Tents (to me) are the same. The Tyvek in question is the best compromise between weight/strengtht/waterproofness and breathability that is available now (in Tyvek....). So for the ones that want a very light but not claustrophobic fully enclosed shelter that has good condensation management (at a reasonable price) the Sublite is a good option. However others like that design but want a more waterproof fabric. Silnylon of the 1.1oz variety is not as waterproof as some other fabrics but it is "enough" and still light and affordable. But it does not breath at all, hence the extra ventilation options, mesh door and bigger head vent. So HS did not take a design and made it heavier, he simply made another option.
    Franco

  3. #23

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    Short and sweet IT DID NOT SELL.NOW PLAN B.

  4. #24
    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by take-a-knee View Post
    Well, just sell me the Virga and you won't have that holding you back.
    Ah, well, you'll have to wait in line. Someone else has already put in a standing offer to buy, should I ever be inclined to sell.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sloth71 View Post
    Yeah, that's my question. How dry are these enclosed tarp tents? I hate getting wet and usually carry a heavier tent just for that reason. I'd love to shed weight, and this is a good looking tent design wise, but I'm worried that a light drizzle would flood the bastid.
    They're pretty doggone dry. It is possible to pitch one incorrectly, so that the roof drains onto the bathtub floor--then you've got a mess. But most of us will only do that once.

    This past weekend it rained solidly all afternoon, sleeted for a while, then turned to snow and snowed all night. Because of the rain and sleet, the snow was sticking to the top of the tent more than it usually does. I woke up a few times during the night with the snow pressing down on my legs. I'd kick my feet a bit, sending the snow sliding off the roof, and go back to sleep. In the morning, the roof was hanging quite a bit lower than normal. The snow had built up along the sides the tent, blocking the mesh. I didn't get any water in the tent.

    Mind you, I've got an older, unimproved model Tarptent. I really like the sound of the dripless entry on the Sublite.
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

    ME>GA 2006
    http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=3277

    Instagram hiking photos: five.leafed.clover

  5. #25
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    Slow
    "Short and sweet IT DID NOT SELL.NOW PLAN B."
    My fault for not having been clear enough. At least three times I mentioned (and others have too) that the silnylon version is on top of ( as well as, also, another option, a different model) the Tyvek version. Unfortunately English is not my first language so I really do not know how I can convey the idea to you more precisely. For whatever reason you have chosen to criticise I product that you obviously haven't a clue of what it is all about, and that is fine. So I would suggest that you look at other shelters and let the ones that are interested in these products enjoy them for what they are.
    Franco

  6. #26

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    FUNNY,the quick setup BOY.

  7. #27
    Savoring Happy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by slow View Post
    FUNNY,the quick setup BOY.

    Now we know why they call you "Slow".
    I am Who I am because I've been THERE .

  8. #28
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    No Belay
    At 53 I take the "boy" comment as a compliment
    Franco

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by No Belay View Post
    Now we know why they call you "Slow".
    Smart enough to know ,the prod didn't sell,and went to sil.

    Also when somone post's to let all know his setup time ...being the fastest show's he is a true H.S. boy.

  10. #30
    Just Hikin' Along
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    From a another recent thread:
    Quote Originally Posted by HikingPA
    after reading the majority of stuff you write slow, i understand why you don't understand.
    About says it all.


  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quoddy View Post
    From a another recent thread:About says it all.
    From what i've seen on this and other boards....you have 5 of all ,and then sell cause your so smart.Maybe you should be slow in buying to save some money...and not lose on resale?

  12. #32
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    Slow:

    when the original Sublite design was shown in pre-production form there were two versions shown at that time - one made of the Tyvek and one of Silnylon. The Tyvek version went to market first but I suspect Henry could have pushed the Silnylon version first to market. Realistically, his resources are limited and likely a choice had to be made. Both versions are being produced but there are some functional differences between them (which are listed on the Tarptent home page). There is and has been no failure of the Tyvek version. In fact, should you choose to do some further research you will find threads on backpackinglight.com which provide some real world use of the product that have proven very successful.

  13. #33

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    Nice post.

  14. #34
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    For the benefits of the ones that are interested in the Sublite, here are some comments from Ryan Jordan, co-founder of Backpackinglight.
    Peter,following the very detail and extensive review of single wall shelters (you need a subscription for this) was asking some clarifications about the Sublite. Here are Ryan's comments :
    "Peter, I have a Tyvek version of the Sublite and I love it for its condensation resistance as much as I'd probably hate a silnylon version for its lack of condensation resistance in cold weather.

    It's also very comfortable in hot weather. Tyvek reflects light and so the tent retains very little heat. You could never go inside your silnylon tent on a hot day and escape the bugs, or take a nap. You can do this in a Tyvek tent even when it's 80 degrees out. It's cooler in the tent - a glorious feature of the fabric.

    My only gripe with the design is its lack of views. I would happily take the weight of a netting door in the tent with the ability to leave the solid fabric flap rolled up and out of the way - that little front window vent leaves a little to be desired when it comes to views!

    In a real storm, the Tyvek Sublite is superb - very stable - and the Tyvek fabric does not shrink when wet or cold like silnylon, so it doesn't sag. I weathered a pretty harsh t-storm this summer with companions who had the Gossamer Gear The One, the SMD Lunar Solo, and a two man tarp. I had the Tyvek Sublite. The tarp and the Sublite remained standing -- the other two blew down in 40 mph (measured) gusts, and The One's spinnaker fabric suffered a rip, not unexpected with that fabric, certainly. (Disclaimer: all of these shelters were pitched very well - we knew the storm was coming). Now, keep in mind that Tyvek has a lower tear strength than The One's Spinnaker -- so it's a testament to the stable design of the Sublite."
    Note that BPL had on hand a prototype of the Sublite Sil, without the mini porch and amplified vent.
    Franco

  15. #35
    Thecaptain thecaptain's Avatar
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    Default suglite sil

    My sublit sil arrived Tue.....i seam sealed it Tue....living in SW virginia 30yards from the AT it has rained the past 2 days and the sublite has been set-up in my yards during the entire storm....arriving from work today I checked the tent about 6 drops of water inside....due to me missing 2 spots seal sealing......the sublite was easy to pitch the first time out....it seems very stable....i have a rainbow and loved it but the lighter weight, the sale price, the lack of a wife, grown kids and a good job...i bought one.....the only thing I noticed is the door opening is smaller the my rainbow but what the hell light is lighter.....i solve the problem of the slick bathtub floor by placing those sticky tricks people put in the shower to pervent slipping on the tent floor...they wre white flowers.....pretty trick and attractive......field report to come later.....henry shires...brain of ULA....western mountaineering....and the boys at trail dsigns have made my pack weight 19 pounds with 3 days food which my 61 year old body approves of
    The Captain
    PS nope not sellin the rainbow keepin it as a loaner for newbie backpacking friends

  16. #36
    Hike smarter, not harder.
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    I want a tyvek sublite with the dripless entry, and a screen door. It doesn't rain very often where I am, but it's hot, and sometimes buggy.

    Doesn't this forum have a feature where you can ignore members? I mean, if you have a hard on for a product, just don't buy it. Pretty simple.

  17. #37
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    Skinewmexico
    "I want a Ttyvek Sublite with the dripless entry". Yes you are not the only one, that is the first thought that crossed my mind when I first saw the design and others have commented about this as well. The problem here is that HS is already selling two versions of the shelter, a third one could be a rather expensive exercise since most do like the sub 500g weight of the Sublite . I haven't seen one as yet but (maybe) adding a hanging screen door could be doable, as for the dripless entry maybe just a piece of Tyvek that works bit like the one on the sil might work. Note that to use the "dripless entry" you need a stick or a long guyline to make it work.
    Franco
    Thank you for the last comment. I have seen several new members beign scared away by the usual suspects ( IE they ask a question, get insulted for doing so and disappear) . It may be fun to the gang but I really don't see the point. But yes, I too don't like many products but I respect the fact that others do

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