Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 73
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-29-2007
    Location
    Frostproof, FL
    Age
    38
    Posts
    5

    Exclamation MRSA Running rampant on A.T. -- Hikers Beware!!

    Everyone in my group got MRSA Staph infections after our A.T. trip. I tried to stay as sanitary as possible, and I still got it.

    Has anyone else experienced this? I was on the Georgia/Southern N.C. section in July.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-29-2007
    Location
    Frostproof, FL
    Age
    38
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Google MRSA and do a little research. It's some scary stuff.

    Here's an article from cnn.com about it.
    http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/condi....ap/index.html

  3. #3
    Registered User shelterbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-29-2007
    Location
    Reading, Pa.
    Age
    65
    Posts
    1,844
    Images
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rem1536 View Post
    Everyone in my group got MRSA Staph infections after our A.T. trip. I tried to stay as sanitary as possible, and I still got it.

    Has anyone else experienced this? I was on the Georgia/Southern N.C. section in July.
    I'm no expert, but I would suspect that someone in your group had already been exposed to it immediately before the trip.

  4. #4

    Default

    MRSA is serious and hospitals have had to close units but there are tons of healthy people walking around carrying it. However, this is the first time I have heard about it being a problem on the A.T. A phrase like "MRSA Running rampant on A.T. -- Hikers Beware!!" is overdramatic. It's pretty much running rampant everywhere and recent information indicates that the problem has been underestimated. The common cold is running rampant on the A.T. as well.

    Certainly tick-borne diseases pose a more frequent and serious threat to the average hiker and it is a problem that does not seem to be taken very seriously by very many.

    Your point about good hygiene is well-taken. Children used to learn hygiene and physical health in school, I have seen the textbooks, but I don't think they do anymore. In 2006 there was at least one hiker who was hiking the ENTIRE trail without bathing. That is asking for trouble.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-09-2004
    Location
    fairborn, ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I don't usually post, I am an avid reader and lurker. I am a nurse who works in a jail setting. Staph is not new and neither is MRSA. staph is on you all the time. A local skin infection needs to be watched, kept clean and dry, and most important keep your hands off. If it gets larger than a dime see a MD. Most staph infections are moved around the body and from people to people by poor hand washing. Yes it can be scary when the media jumps on the band wagon hyping the situation. MRSA is not new and there are ways of treating most infections. So wash your hands, don't share clothes or sleeping bags. Clean your equipment on a regular basis. just my 2 cents worth.

    fitz

  6. #6
    trash, hiker the goat's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-27-2005
    Location
    the timbers of fennario
    Posts
    2,835
    Images
    4

    Default Drug-Resistant Staph Germ's Toll Is Higher Than Thought

    "The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions, that I wish it always to be kept alive." -TJ

  7. #7
    Registered User Fahrenheit's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-06-2006
    Location
    Duluth, GA
    Age
    38
    Posts
    42

    Default

    MRSA may not be new but in recent years the amount of community acquired MRSA has sky-rocketed. It is something that the health community is only just starting to realize the scope of. On the other hand that Washington Post article strikes me as a bit over-dramatic. MRSA can be quite nasty but the worst cases we see are hospital acquired in already sick people . Community acquired MRSA, which is what the OP's group likely had, is no fun but usually much easier to treat. Its definately important to get it treated though as you can get quite sick.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fitz View Post
    I don't usually post, I am an avid reader and lurker. I am a nurse who works in a jail setting. Staph is not new and neither is MRSA. staph is on you all the time. A local skin infection needs to be watched, kept clean and dry, and most important keep your hands off. If it gets larger than a dime see a MD. Most staph infections are moved around the body and from people to people by poor hand washing. Yes it can be scary when the media jumps on the band wagon hyping the situation. MRSA is not new and there are ways of treating most infections. So wash your hands, don't share clothes or sleeping bags. Clean your equipment on a regular basis. just my 2 cents worth.

    fitz
    Do you work in a jail or prison? Have you had a problem with MRSA? Drug-resistant TB with HIV+ prisoners? I'm just curious as to what changes or trends you've seen in the last few years.

  9. #9
    Registered User handlebar's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-05-2005
    Location
    Youngstown, OH
    Age
    75
    Posts
    988
    Images
    1

    Default Some in 06 too

    Quote Originally Posted by rem1536 View Post
    Everyone in my group got MRSA Staph infections after our A.T. trip. I tried to stay as sanitary as possible, and I still got it.

    Has anyone else experienced this? I was on the Georgia/Southern N.C. section in July.
    My hiking buddy Veto, who had been an intensive care nurse, got a boil on his knee and then got an infection on his foot that took him off the trail for 3 weeks. Turned out to MRSA.

    I had a boil where my pack rubbed against a vertebre. It was resistant to some of the antibiotics, but healed promptly when drained at Millinocket and treated with a broad spectrum antibiotic.

    What someone posted about hygiene is important. It's also important do deal with infections promptly.
    Handlebar
    GA-ME 06; PCT 08; CDT 10,11,12; ALT 11; MSPA 12; CT 13; Sheltowee 14; AZT 14, 15; LT 15;FT 16;NCT-NY&PA 16; GET 17-18

  10. #10

    Default

    A lot of hospital employees, especially in the ICU, test positive for MRSA and that's method of transmission.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-20-2002
    Location
    Damascus, Virginia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    31,207

    Default

    stay out of all hostels and shelters and y'all will be fine

  12. #12
    1700 down, 460 to go...
    Join Date
    01-23-2005
    Location
    Todd, NC
    Age
    45
    Posts
    952
    Images
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Appalachian Tater View Post
    However, this is the first time I have heard about it being a problem on the A.T. A phrase like "MRSA Running rampant on A.T. -- Hikers Beware!!" is overdramatic.
    I saw at least two thru-hikers who had staph or MRSA infections in the VT/NH/ME region. There were reports of several others with the same issue. Considering I'd never heard of staph infections on the trail before this season, I don't think this is terribly overdramatic.

    I'm curious, rem1536, you said your whole group got infections... how many folks is that?

    Now the news programs on Charlotte's local CBS affiliate that run "investigative" reports on how much "bacteria that can make you sick" exists on (bathroom sink faucets, high school drinking fountains, or whatever surface strikes their fancy) ... now that's overdramatic.
    "when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." --HST
    Uncle Silly VA->VT '05, VT->ME '07, VA->GA ??

  13. #13
    2010 complete
    Join Date
    06-24-2007
    Location
    hickory, nc
    Age
    61
    Posts
    1,970

    Default

    I don't know much about mrsa, but I had staph when I was 10 yrs old from an infected mosquito bite. Spent a week in the hospital.

  14. #14

    Default

    Interesting first and second posts by this user
    ad astra per aspera

  15. #15

    Default

    Staph. aureus is a common bacteria on the skin and in the nose. MRSA is the same bacteria, it has just changed genetically to be resistant to methicillin. A hundred years ago people died from infected mosquito bites and pimples and boils all the time. As organisms become resistant and the pace of discovering new antibiotics slows, you will see more people dying from infections.

    MRSA contaminates surfaces and is transmitted that way as well as person-to-person.

    Many MRSA infections in otherwise healthy people start out looking like a bug bite and develop into a boil. Another common form is an infection of the hair follicles in a rash. Anything unusual like this and you should seek medical attention.

    MRSA is nothing new and there has not been some horrible increase in the number of cases over a short period of time. What's new is the media attention. If a group on the A.T. got it, it's no different from a group getting diarrhea at the same time or sharing a cold. There is no need to spread panic or create drama. The situation today is no different than it was a month ago nor is it different than it will be a month from now. When seeking information on it from the internet, look for reliable sources like the CDC, physician organizations, etc, and not the news bites on the 11 o'clock news. They are no more reliable at reporting on MRSA than they are on bear "attacks".

  16. #16
    Registered User Frolicking Dinosaurs's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-25-2005
    Location
    Frolicking elsewhere
    Posts
    12,398
    Images
    15

    Default

    He-Dino got MRSA when he has the surgery for the table saw accident in July 2006. Papaw Dino got it in an injury to his leg incurred during yard maintenance (the community acquired variety). Both were nasty stuff and hard to treat. Both ended up being successfully treated with a very old class of antibiotics that is rarely used anymore - the sulfur-based antibiotics. Seems MRSA has genetically forgotten about those drugs.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-02-2007
    Location
    east killingly, ct
    Posts
    1,196
    Images
    270

    Default

    a good sign of this; is a wound that is sensitive to touch, gets more red, fills with more puss than usual, increases in size ....theses are a few symptoms to look for.....peace out, nitewalker

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-02-2007
    Location
    east killingly, ct
    Posts
    1,196
    Images
    270

    Default

    maybe the world needs to burn itself clean of all these viruses. natures way of cleaning up all the scum!!!.. how do you think they got rid of all the rats in chicago, fire or was that in boston..im not sure but there was some big city back around the turn of the century that was having a disease problem being spread by rats then they had the great fire which in a sense got rid of the rats and the disease went with them....fire, how about a little fire scarecrow!!!!!! peace out, nitewalker

  19. #19
    Registered User shelterbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-29-2007
    Location
    Reading, Pa.
    Age
    65
    Posts
    1,844
    Images
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nitewalker View Post
    ....fire, how about a little fire scarecrow!!!!!! peace out, nitewalker
    I'd just prefer NOT to be the scarecrow, thank you!

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-09-2004
    Location
    fairborn, ohio
    Age
    58
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I work in a county jail which at my building houses over 200 inmates. Yes skin infections are on the rise. Most of my inmates claim they are spider bites. We have to educate them on spider behavior. Most spiders don't go out of there way to bite a human. Never had a real spider bite here but we do have a good amount of staph infections. Our HIV population is non-existant. We may get one person a yr in with HIV. I have been here 6 yrs and never had a case of active TB. Inmates and skin problems go hand in hand d/t they have nothing but time to scratch and pick at themselves.

    fitz

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •