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  1. #1

    Default Springer to Fontana Section

    Doing this chunk with my 27yr old starting Sunday 14 July.

    I thru'd in 21. SOBO, so was on top of my GAME so to speak (pun intended). Seemed like easy miles therefore. Trying to think realistically and keep it to about 10/day. We did that in the 100 Mile last summer, so I think that's reasonable.

    Also it was chilly, which I'm guessing won't be the case in July!

    Checked FarOut, seems like most water is flowing to some degree, except the more ephemeral. But a lot of those are a few weeks out of date now. Any updates appreciated.

    Also I saw that now the Forest Service has effectively banned my Ursack. I got it to avoid doing the sub-par hangs that usually come around twilight. Are folks actually using bear cans now? I know it shouldn't bother me, but the idea of a 2+ pound food container irks me.

    Is Noro still cropping up there, given that it should be less crowded, at least from a thru hiker standpoint?

    Any advice welcomed. Thanks

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-14-2015
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    Rome, Georgia
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    June and early July have been very hot and dry in much of north Georgia. It will be hot to very hot on the trail in July, so knowing where there are dependable water sources (whether creek or spring) will be important. Far Out should provide good up-to-date info because a fair number of section hikers use the trail this time of year. Major sources like Stover Creek and Clear Creek should be fine; the Georgia shelters all have reliable water, as best I recall. But some of the trailside springs/creeks are likely to be dry.

    Given the typical heat and humidity, you'll want to start very early in the morning. Too, take advantage of any breezes and/or moderate temps you might find on the heights to get relief.

    I can't help with bear can regulations, but you should be able to find that easily on Whiteblaze, ATC, or USFS websites. I don't think Noro will be a concern now. I wouldn't hesitate to sleep in the Georgia shelters now, though I prefer tenting.

  3. #3

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    Thanks, will be sure to camel up. Do you happen to know if it isokay to leave a car at Amicalola for two weeks?

  4. #4
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    There is a good parking lot near the "Archway" that I've used in the past for my sections. That's good if you're beginning at the Arch and doing the Approach Trail. Call the Lodge if you wish to park there - I don't know about long term parking there. I wouldn't chance parking for two weeks up on the forest service road near the Terminus at Springer. If none of those options suit, finding a local hostel or shuttler with parking room is the next best option.

  5. #5
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    Join Date
    07-23-2022
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina
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    103

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    Amicalola will let you park but you need to buy a parking pass.

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks folks.

    How are the bugs this time of year?

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2012
    Location
    Northwest Georgia
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    65
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    Please ditch the URSACK. I quit counting how many have been ripped open, especially this year. WhiteBlazer has wonderful pics of what even a racoon can do to these. You should see what a porcupine can do to it out West. There is good reason why they are not approved. There is a video on YouTube showing two parties at NOC with their bags ripped top to bottom, and a first for me was the titanium cookpot crushed into a heap. Black bears are underestimated for their strength, AND speed!

  8. #8
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    Northwest Georgia
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    Horrible, yes to a headnet, no natural bug repellant as it also attracts bears. I use a long sleeve shirt and pants, socks all treated with Permetherin. If you wait till August/September, then the yellow jackets/hornets of which nothing works on. But I still go and enjoy, better to suck there than down here in the world.

  9. #9
    Registered User
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    08-12-2012
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    Northwest Georgia
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    Yes, inform the booth attendant you are a thruhiker hitting the AT. It will be fiver dollars, take a right up the gravel road just past the booth and park along that service road. Put your reciept on your dash which will indicate your projected return date. Many thruhikers leave their vehicles here for several months and I know of no problems. The Approach Trail is your best friend in more than one way and still one of my favorites. I always work it in if possible.

  10. #10
    Registered User
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    08-14-2015
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    Rome, Georgia
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    Bugs should be minimal. I hike the Georgia mountains in the summer all the time and never use bug spray (clothes or on skin). There aren't any bugs, to speak of, in the AT high country in July. I never have an issue this time of year with biting flies, gnats, or mosquitos. Ticks are possible but fairly uncommon, as they become less active in July and later. Chiggers are here but just a nuisance. Wasps/hornets are occasional, as with anywhere else. Probably the only thing you'll really notice is the raucous katydid chorus at night.

    Quote Originally Posted by HankIV View Post
    Thanks folks.

    How are the bugs this time of year?

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