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Thread: Pumpkin Soup

  1. #1
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    Default Pumpkin Soup

    Everybody knows pumpkin soup?
    We grow our own pumpkins, and love cooking it in various dishes. Pumpkin stew is one of the dried stuff I'm carrying on my hikes.
    Now we tried to dry pumpkin soup, which worked just fine. BTW, this time we didn't use the electric dehydrator, but just put the stuff atop the central heating furnace.
    Today we tried to rehydrate one of the pumpkin soup packages - and it was great!
    Highly recommended.

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    That sounds delicious
    And really healthy eating, pumpkin is loaded with goodness it has vitamins A,b1,b2 ,C and more plus calcium, potassium, magnesium oh yeah that will keep you going up the trail!

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    How do you prepare the seeds? I've had toasted pumpkin seeds they're really good. I imagine you could make a trail mix utilizing them?

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    I've had barbequed pumpkin, it was awesome. We made a baste of olive oil and spices. I allow myself a treat of pumpkin ice cream once a year. It's a seasonal flavor at a local creamery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    How do you prepare the seeds? I've had toasted pumpkin seeds they're really good. I imagine you could make a trail mix utilizing them?
    There are many different types of pumpkin, many of them especially for human food, and those have seeds with a hard shell you'd need to crack individually before eating. Not the best type for to use as a snack.
    There are other types of pumpkin that have seeds with a thin paper-like shell, that are perfect to munch as a snack, but the meat of such pumpkin isn't good for humans to eat.
    There are other types of pumpkin that are designed to press oil from the seeds, and the pumpkin seed oil is very worthy and said to be even healthier than the seeds.
    An area not too far from our place is famous for its pumpkin seed oil and they offer many dishes with a spray of this black oil atop, they make even ice cream with pumpkin seed oil.
    For us older guys: Pumkin seeds, and the oil, is said to be one of very few ways to keep the prostate from growing too big, if taken on a regular basis.

  6. #6

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    My favorite eating pumpkin is Long Pie, which makes great pies, pumpkin bread, and soup. I've grown it for years, and it keeps well into the winter.

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    Did the dried soup process similar to a fruit leather? This is a great idea, thanks for letting us know it works. I’ll try it on a butternut squash soup that is similar.

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    Pumkin Soup Leather sounds like it could work.....somehow??

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    The dehydrated pumpkin soup has kind of a crumbling consistency, far from leather.
    Suppose you would need some kind of gluey stuff to the soup to give it some leathery apperance.

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    Crumbly, eh? Very interesting, I’ll try it and see how it comes out.

    Thanks!

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    My wife just confessed that the dehydrated soup was exactly of leathery consistency, but she processed it in the kitchen machine to grind it down to a crumbly powder. Due to not have any sharp edges in the stuff that could pierce the plastic bag.

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    Cool! Thanks for the detail. A food processor post processing would make it rehydrate faster too I bet.

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    Yes, it'll rehydrate faster and is easier to stir in the bag while rehydrating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    My wife just confessed that the dehydrated soup was exactly of leathery consistency,
    So there ya go....we need her recipe to have it be "leathery" please and thank you

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    I had the idea to melt marshmallows the way they do for rice crispy treats and add the dehydrated soup to make it leathery

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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    So there ya go....we need her recipe to have it be "leathery" please and thank you
    Cue the jeopardy theme song .

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Cue the jeopardy theme song .


  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    There are many different types of pumpkin, many of them especially for human food, and those have seeds with a hard shell you'd need to crack individually before eating. Not the best type for to use as a snack.
    There are other types of pumpkin that have seeds with a thin paper-like shell, that are perfect to munch as a snack, but the meat of such pumpkin isn't good for humans to eat.
    There are other types of pumpkin that are designed to press oil from the seeds, and the pumpkin seed oil is very worthy and said to be even healthier than the seeds.
    An area not too far from our place is famous for its pumpkin seed oil and they offer many dishes with a spray of this black oil atop, they make even ice cream with pumpkin seed oil.
    For us older guys: Pumkin seeds, and the oil, is said to be one of very few ways to keep the prostate from growing too big, if taken on a regular basis.
    I think the word pumpkin is used more broadly outside the US. In the US, we also use the terms "squash" as well as "gourds" and more narrowly refer to pumpkins as the mostly orange kind that you can carve into a jack-o-lantern and make a pie out of. A pumpkin is a type of winter squash and there is also summer squash. All of these are curcubits from the family Curcubitaceae.

    Or were you focusing solely on the stricter US nomenclature of orange pumpkins?
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    As a non-native speaker (writer) I must confess that I really miss many words and expressions, especially of American English.
    Friends here are British expats and if I ask them about words from the forum here, many they dont know either.
    Add in loads of bugs from the Autofill, and it ends up at my poor English.
    Sorry for that, and thanks for any correction.

    Yes, I used the word "pumpkin" for all those bulbous fruits we are growing here.

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    I agree that when I visited Graz, the word pumpkin was used more generically than I was used to, including most baking squashes (butternut, acorn), etc. They all are treated (and taste) similar in the kitchen.

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