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  1. #1

    Default Which Fire Maple stove should I get .08 Liter or 1 Liter?

    I already received these 2 Fire Maple models from Amazon recently, I will return one (havent used them).

    Havent been backpacking in a while.

    So the Fire Maples I bought are identical in features but one is 1Liter and bigger and slightly heavier and the other is .8 Liter, smaller and little bit lighter. I just cant remember how much would it matter having 1L vs .8L for cooking vs the bigger size and bulk etc of the bigger.

    There is a comparative chart on the 1st link below.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078XRQSDM...t_details&th=1

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07FGDFMBS/ref=emc_b_5_i?th=1

    Thoughts?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    So in a nutshell, will I wish I had 1Liter and worth the slightly bigger blueprint and weight?

  3. #3

    Default

    If you cook food in the pot get the 1L, if you just boil water and put it in food pouches, get the.8.

  4. #4

    Default

    If you’re cooking for more than one person, consider the larger model.

    For what it’s worth I would only boil water using these stoves.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chknfngrs View Post
    If youíre cooking for more than one person, consider the larger model.

    For what itís worth I would only boil water using these stoves.
    Do you mean no to cook food in them? why?

  6. #6

    Default

    They can be hard to clean.

    Between the flame running hot and the small surface area of the bottom of the pot could easily lend to burnt food which is lame when all you want is calories.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tombolino View Post
    Do you mean no to cook food in them? why?
    Looks like it might be a Jetboil knockoff and most users report using those mainly to boil water. I don't own a Jetboil so I can't comment on the difficulty but scorching is a concern noted.
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  8. #8
    Wanna-be hiker trash
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tombolino View Post
    Do you mean no to cook food in them? why?
    From the photos in the links these appear to be knock-offs/variations of Jetboil's designs. If so, then I'll echo the warning to be very cautious of cooking anything in them as the designs are really intended for boiling and are notorious for scorching/charring food at the bottom,I can also confirm this from personal experience. Usually I test cook any potential hiking meals at home to make sure that they can be cooked effectively in my jetboil before I try them on trail.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  9. #9

    Default

    Don't try to cook in a jetboil or jetboil-like apparatus. Just means you'll be hiking with a dirty jetboil. Boil water for steamer bag cooking.

  10. #10

    Default

    If you are planning a thru hike, would discourage planning cooking. Too much work at end of long days, or nights.

  11. #11
    There are 10 types of people: those who understand binary and those who don't.
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    Default

    .08 Liters? That's the size of a thimble.

    Since buying a 550ml Toakes, I've not carried my MSR 850ml pot. In three season camping, less is more.
    Give me a mile of trail and I can show you the forest. Give me a mile of runway and I can show you the world.
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  12. #12
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tombolino View Post
    Do you mean no to cook food in them? why?
    I cook in my pots as it gives me more options for cooking store-bought food from scratch.

  13. #13
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    Default

    I used to use an Olicamp XTS pot which is much like the 1 L Fire Maple pot. I switched to the Jetboil Stash pot which is 0.8. I switched because the Olicamp pot was bigger than I needed and very heavy. The Stash was just the right size for one person meals but much lighter. Both are Aluminum, but the Stash is thinner and less bulky without being fragile. However I use mine with an eCHS MYOG alcohol burner. Burnt food is not a problem as I only bring the food to boil for a few seconds while the mix is still very soupy. Boil over is not a problem as the pot is not attached to the stand/stove so I can just lift the pot off when it boils. I fabricated an insulated sleeve for the pot so the boild food sets off the stove to finish the cooking. The boil time is about 4 minutes.

  14. #14

    Default

    Your question really brings up two great admonitions:

    1. Hike your own hike
    2. Begin with the end in mind (thanks Steven Covey)

    Will you require a stove at all? There are folks who donít.

    Are you of the ďfood is fuelĒ camp, or are you more selective for health, religious or personal preference reasons?

    Are you thru hiking, section hiking, or just out for a few weekends?

    For me, I really love a hot cup of coffee in the morning. I enjoy, but probably could live without, a warm dinner. Iím not a very demanding eater on the trail, more in the food is fuel group.

    I went with the Stash system, the whole thing. I just needed hot water. When I couldnít get cook in the pouch freeze dried meals, I got instant mashed potatoes. Those I did put in the pot, (with some Fritos and olive oil). But they are instant, no simmer needed. And they clean up pretty well, with just a little water. FWIW, a four serving envelope of them firs in the .7 L Stash pot just fine.

    Although I am generally sort of cold natured, I probably could have shipped my stove ahead from North Adams MA to Harpers Ferry on my SOBO thru.

    Anyway, if you didnít already, would start with those sorts of questions before focusing in on particular stove qualities.

    Best of luck.
    Last edited by HankIV; 11-19-2023 at 09:37. Reason: Added comment on mashed potato

  15. #15

    Default

    Excellent questions to ask (and really liked the Steve reference)!

    One question I would add is are you cooking with/for someone who you are traveling with. Jet-boil systems and related knock-offs boil water quickly and are great for simple meals requiring boiling water to be added (Mountain House, etc), however they tend to burn food easily and can be a little tricky to use, If cooking for more than one person, you may want to consider bringing a different stove along (with or without) a jet boil since they tend to burn food easily as opposed to a more regulated cooking flame like a Whisper Light stove has, which that can cook a wide variety of things, including boiling water so two MH meals can be ready at the same time.

  16. #16

    Default

    Thanks all!

    Im definitely in food is fuel camp, 2 night weekends. Prob may be with my tween kid in near future. I already own a GSI pot and a pocket rocket knockoff. The Jetboil type is alluring bc its steady and quick but perhaps too heavy?....

  17. #17

    Default

    Will prob go more old school, no JetBoil type

  18. #18

    Default

    I have always looked at a stove as something to cook on and as source of emergency heat allowing me to carry a bit less gear. One spring while on section hike we had a week of unusually cold weather for April. We had a couple of cold clear nights out in the open (no shelter) where the temps were below freezing around 7 PM. I heated up a nalgene bottle and put in in the bottom of my sleeping bag with my stove. That worked until around 4 AM when I had to fire off the stove again and heat another one. Even if it made me short on fuel, I could alwasy do supper on a wood fire. I probably have avoided hypothermia once or twice on spring section hike where we got caught in the rain all day, no substitute for making some soup for lunch to get warmed back up. BTW every NH Fish and Game Officer on rescue usually has primary and backup stove in their pack on an S&R event, they know there is no substitute to getting warm liquids into someone they rescue. Once a person is in the stages of hypthermia, they have lost the ability to generate enough body heat, they can be wrapped up in extra layers but the only way to get them out of it is the add heat to them.

  19. #19

    Default

    Appreciate that post Peakbagger. I don't normally drink tea, but might start carrying a pouch or two now on my colder hikes. I guess if an emergency I could always add Mio or Propell to hot water, but tea would probably taste better.

  20. #20
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro View Post
    Appreciate that post Peakbagger. I don't normally drink tea, but might start carrying a pouch or two now on my colder hikes. I guess if an emergency I could always add Mio or Propell to hot water, but tea would probably taste better.
    I almost always have a cup of tea after supper and hot chocolate with a shot of Sartbucks Via in the AM. Not only does it warm you up, it helps keep my pot clean (since In cook in the pot), but the tea does sometimes come out tasting a bit like supper.

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