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  1. #1

    Default Wild Ideas Bearikade bear canister

    If this is in the wrong forum, I apologize. Mods feel free to delete it.

    I've owned the very expensive and relatively light Wild Ideas Bearikade Blazer bear canister for a few years. It's pricey but my philosophy is, "buy once cry once." I recently learned something new and thought maybe others could use this info. Or maybe I'm just a slow learner and everyone already knows this.

    The Wild Idea bear canisters employ a Dzus fastener. A Dzus fastener is also sometimes called a quarter turn screw. While a coin can be used to open a Dzus fastener, a tool made for the task can be more comfortable to use. This is a quick rundown on some Dzus tools, which is the tool used for the Dzus fastener. Dzus tools can be found on various internet shops by searching for “Dzus tool” or “quarter turn screw tool.” Prices usually run around $20-30 including shipping. If one is springing $300-400 for a bear canister, another $20-30 shouldn't be a deal breaker.

    tools1.jpg

    The grid is 1 inch square. All tools are lined up along the left edge. The top tool appears to hang over, but it doesn’t.

    1: Quarter Turn Tool Bryke Fasteners. Traditional screwdriver style. The handle is about 1 inch square. This tool provides more reach than the others.
    2: An aviation Dzus tool, sometimes called a “Snoopy.” The handle has plastic riveted to the metal with a total width of about 3/8 inch. This is a WWII era tool however newer versions exist.
    3: Dzus Self Ejecting Fastener Tool by UPR Products. A flat, steel tool about 1/16 inch thick.
    4: Homemade tool made from titanium, also about 1/16 inch thick. Yes, it weighs a tiny bit more than the steel tool.
    Last edited by perrymk; 10-12-2023 at 16:00.

  2. #2
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    I wonder why the two flat ones don’t have lanyard holes drilled so you are less likely to lose them?

  3. #3

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    My guess is #3 wasn’t intended for backpacking use. #4 I made myself, actually made several, and it didn’t occur to me as necessary. It would be easy enough to drill a lanyard hole if one were so inclined.

  4. #4

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    I don't own a Bearikade, but I’ve read that they are not that hard to open with a quarter. If you want a lanyard hole, you could just use a washer. If for some reason you found the washer hard to turn you could put a stick through the hole and apply more torque with the stick.

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    I have one and a quarter is not only easy to use, it's like the perfect thing to use in my experience. No need for anything more then that. They tell you that if the locks are hard to turn to add a drop of a oil. I think they specified what oil to use but don't remember, might want to check. I think somewhere on their website they mention maintenance and what not.
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    I prefer the BV450 for solo hiking (BV500 for 2 ppl), a little tricky to open but once you do it over and over again (like on my JMT & PCT thru-hikes) it becomes easy. I would probably lose a tool that I have to carry in order to eat. my 2 cents
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by LazyLightning View Post
    I have one and a quarter is not only easy to use, it's like the perfect thing to use in my experience. No need for anything more then that. They tell you that if the locks are hard to turn to add a drop of a oil. I think they specified what oil to use but don't remember, might want to check. I think somewhere on their website they mention maintenance and what not.
    Took a Bearikade on my 100 mile shakedown hike. Never had a problem opening or closing with a quarter. Well at lease until I dropped the quarter into the abyss of my backpack. Too lazy to empty my entire pack I used the backup washer I had lanyarded to my pack in anticipating of losing my quarter. I have a few buckles and other things on/in my pack I could use in an emergency so I didn't starve although they would not be as convenient as a quarter or washer.

    I was glad to be able to use the canister as a seat at my campsites. I also did not have to frustrate and embarrass myself with my pathetic throwing skills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittyslayer View Post
    TWell at lease until I dropped the quarter into the abyss of my backpack. .
    Time to get a stainless steel washer....

  9. #9

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    I usually bring a Light My Fire fire (fire steel) and use the striker to open both my Garcia and my Bearikade cans. My 2 cents.

  10. #10
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    I too have a Bearikade, and I thought I would share some little known, not public info concerning an extensive study done in the western Yosemite where the highest density of backcountry users and bears coexist. A few years back, apporoximately 250 canisters were 'assaulted' by the end of the summer hiker rush. That means various things with many never being recovered-they roll & uphill three quarters of a mile. Of those where entry was gained, and that was too many, virtually all of the Bearikades were not fully secured. All the fasteners must be 'locked.' A """"""single """""" unsecured fastener is emminent failure to a seasoned black bear. Of those interviewed, it was after dark, big hurry, scared due to a bear coming on scene, raining/thunderstorms/hail, secure ALL of the fasteners!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Match View Post
    All the fasteners must be 'locked.' A """"""single """""" unsecured fastener is emminent failure to a seasoned black bear. Of those interviewed, it was after dark, big hurry, scared due to a bear coming on scene, raining/thunderstorms/hail, secure ALL of the fasteners!

  12. #12
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    Honestly, I can't imagine carrying a separate tool just for opening my Bearikade.
    I slip several quarters in my backpack, in different places. Sometimes have one in my pocket as well.
    Plus, I have a quarter taped to the top of the Bearikade. I'm not worried that a bear will use it.

  13. #13

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    One quarter in the hip pocket of my pack with a backup stashed in case the first one gets lost. Did 600 miles over 2 months on 1 quarter so I guess I was packing my fears with the second one, but I'd do it again. Would hate to starve to death because I couldn't get the can open
    “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...”~Henry David Thoreau

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