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  1. #21
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Half View Post
    most people fail to recognize that ticks are still active in winter
    As a matter of fact it takes several days below 10 degrees to kill ticks which rarely happens anymore. And they are active at 40 degrees. Also beware of the lone star tick especially if you like meat!

  2. #22
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    Ticks could also survive underwater for very long periods so they don't get drowned out either.
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
    -
    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Half View Post
    most people fail to recognize that ticks are still active in winter
    At least they are moving slower, so itís easier to get enough for a stew.

  4. #24

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    I`ve been hiking the AT since before your parents were born. Slow? When I started you didnt see ANYONE on the Trail
    loose lips sink ships

  5. #25
    TOW's Avatar
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    Ramdino on Youtube says hiker numbers are down since 2020...

  6. #26

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    Well, on the bright side, everyone concerned about overuse can relax a little now.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Half View Post
    most people fail to recognize that ticks are still active in winter
    Iíve watched a tick sitting steady stretched out on the edge of a leaf at exactly 32* F stick right to my leg as I brushed by it purposely. Very slow moving after latching on.
    Seen two at 32*F on my person, again, very slow moving
    Had read they can be active down to freezing, so wouldnít doubt a cpl degrees below.

  8. #28
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    Y'all need to move to north Georgia, where these super ticks don't exist. Here, 99.5% of ticks become inactive by September, 99.99% by October, and we don't see the first ones of the season until the next April. Oh, once in a blue moon I'll encounter one during the dormant months, but it's so rare as to be statistically irrelevant. I've spent a great deal of time outdoors working and hiking here since 1979, so I'm comfortable putting this in writing.

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