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  1. #1
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Default Spotted lanternfly ?

    Not sure if there's already a thread on this but.....
    How big of a problem are these little boogers?
    I'm about a half hour north of Harpers Ferry and I just this morning found one on my back door stoop.

  2. #2
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    I told someone about it at work and they told me I'm supposed to report it.

  3. #3
    Registered User somers515's Avatar
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    In NJ we are encouraged to kill them on sight. Two years ago I hadn't seen one in my area, last year we had a few and I reported it. This year there are even more.

    USDA APHIS | Spotted Lanternfly
    LT End-to-Ender 2017; AT from Lehigh Gap to Hudson River; NH 48
    "Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won't come in." - Isaac Asimov

  4. #4

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    Like most non-native insects, Spotted Lanternfly represent a pretty significant risk to trees, shrubs, and gardens. Most states where these insects are found encourage their destruction on site to help slow their proliferation. Reporting sightings of the insect is valuable data that can provide State agencies useful information for population control methods much as it did for the Spongy Moth Caterpillar (formerly Gypsy Moth Caterpillar).

    https://www.agriculture.pa.gov/Plant...s/default.aspx

  5. #5
    Registered User Majortrauma's Avatar
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    Kill them with impunity and report it.

  6. #6
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    I googled it. It is a pretty little moth. I would still attempt to remove it. I am a gardener. I don't like any insect that damages my crops.

  7. #7
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    I mass murdered a bunch of them last year, and am unapologetic.

  8. #8
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Another lovely gift from our friends from the east destroys over 100 plants and bushes. Not sure what pronoun it prefered but it met its demise by way of porcelain convenience. I typically don't like to kill things even the occasional bug in the house I'll either let go or put it outside.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Majortrauma View Post
    Kill them with impunity and report it.
    As of this morning the State of NJ is no longer asking you to report them since they've got so many (and so many reports). Just continue to kill them if possible.
    "It goes to show you never can tell." - Charles Edward Anderson Berry

  10. #10

    Default Webinar at Noon Today on Spotted Lanternfly

    There's a free webinar today at 12:00 pm:

    Blue Ridge PRISM Brown Bag Webinar: Tree of Heaven & the Spotted Lanternfly

    Registration is required but it looks like registration is still open.

  11. #11

    Default Reporting is important where Spotted Lanternfly is just emerging

    I can see that in areas that are already overwhelmed with Spotted Lanternfly reporting is not useful (re Old Grouse's comment). However, where it's just emerging, it is important to report.

    Harpers Ferry National Historical Park has a page dedicated to the Lanternfly, with information on how to report it in Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland, and other useful links in other states.

    Also—not sure if there is a better map somewhere else—but iNaturalist has a map showing citizen scientists reports of Lanternfly spottings. Even if it's not reflecting entire populations, it will give you an idea of whether it's been spotted near you or not. I think it's good to report there in addition to the official state websites. The iNaturalist app is really fun and easy to use, by the way! It's a great way to learn how to identify plants and animals. Because it sometimes gives multiple suggestions, I use it in tandem with the PictureThis app, and sometimes have to do additional. research, but it's a great way to get started.

  12. #12
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Anybody out there hiking seen hundreds if not thousands on a tree. I've seen on YouTube this.

  13. #13
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lauriep View Post
    I can see that in areas that are already overwhelmed with Spotted Lanternfly reporting is not useful (re Old Grouse's comment). However, where it's just emerging, it is important to report.

    Harpers Ferry National Historical Park has a page dedicated to the Lanternfly, with information on how to report it in Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland, and other useful links in other states.

    Also—not sure if there is a better map somewhere else—but iNaturalist has a map showing citizen scientists reports of Lanternfly spottings. Even if it's not reflecting entire populations, it will give you an idea of whether it's been spotted near you or not. I think it's good to report there in addition to the official state websites. The iNaturalist app is really fun and easy to use, by the way! It's a great way to learn how to identify plants and animals. Because it sometimes gives multiple suggestions, I use it in tandem with the PictureThis app, and sometimes have to do additional. research, but it's a great way to get started.
    Thank you I agree once overwhelmed what are we to do?

  14. #14
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Very informative information, I'll check this app out.
    I concur with the traveler we are going to have to come with something, maybe the gypsy moth spray will work on these " pretty little mothes as well".

  15. #15
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    .......and I had to Google were the gypsy moth came from .
    From a fellow from Europe trying to make a sturdier silkworm.
    Which now has a voracious appetite for more than 300 of our plants and trees,bushes!
    One more question how far north are these appetites for destruction?

  16. #16
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Anybody out there hiking seen hundreds if not thousands on a tree. I've seen on YouTube this.
    Terminate by rolling pin?
    Good night folks.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    .......and I had to Google were the gypsy moth came from .
    From a fellow from Europe trying to make a sturdier silkworm.
    Which now has a voracious appetite for more than 300 of our plants and trees,bushes!
    One more question how far north are these appetites for destruction?
    The Spongy Moth (new name for Gypsy Moth) is in NH in the Southern Whites. The Conway NH area (about 10 miles south of the AT has been hit hard. Oaks really do not grow in abundance north of the White Mountain National Forest and Oak is the moth's preferred food. The moths will clean out the oaks and then move on to other tree types, but if the oaks are not there, they usually are not a major issue. Emerald Ash borer is also coming at the whites from the south and the east. Ash trees taper off north of the whites but the density in the woods is lower. EABs tend to move around a lot and most likely they will find enough Ash trees to wipe them out in the whites.

  18. #18
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    Thanks PB, kinda frustrating all we can do is watch the destruction. Are you spotting any of the spotted Lanternfly,yet?
    And how far north are they wondering minds wanna know.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Thank you I agree once overwhelmed what are we to do?
    If you've got a lot of them on your property, apparently the latest recommendation is to trap them, rather than employing a sticky band as previously recommended (too much collateral damage?) Here's how to build one: How to Build a New Style Spotted Lanternfly Circle Trap. (This comes from the PennState Extension, which is considered the leading authority, I believe, at this time.)

    As for larger scale, I haven't yet heard about spraying being employed as has been done for Gypsy moth/Spongy moth (although I haven't looked into that specifically). However, I do know Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (which covers more than 3,600 acres in West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia) is undertaking a multi-year project to greatly reduce the number of Spotted Lanternfly host trees (Tree-of-Heaven/Ailanthus altissima) in the park. I think the goal is to eventually reduce the number of trees by 80%.

    One thing I haven't yet learned is how much removing Tree-of-Heaven impacts the Spotted Lanternfly population. The lanternfly will feed on over 70 different other plant species even if Tree-of-Heaven is preferred. Regardless, controlling the highly invasive exotic Tree-of-Heaven is definitely worthwhile as it "produces an overly abundant amount of seeds, crowds out native species with its dense thickets and secretes a chemical into the soil that is toxic to surrounding plants" according to one source.
    Last edited by Lauriep; 08-18-2022 at 21:44.

  20. #20
    Wanna-be hiker trash
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    I killed hundreds of SLFs on trail in Northern PA last October. It got so bad that I had to stop because it was taking up so much time that it was messing up my itinerary.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

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