WhiteBlaze Pages 2022
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$5 for printable PDF, AVAILABLE NOW. $9 for interactive PDF(smartphone version)
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 54
  1. #1

    Default ATC takes official stand on bear canisters

    https://appalachiantrail.org/news/at...ge-containers/

    Not sure how many will listen; I still see folks thinking the ATC should provide bear cables/boxes everywhere, while others insist they can successfully hang their food or that they're fine keeping their food in their tent.

    I've been carrying a canister on the AT for several years now; the added weight is more than balanced by my not worrying about doing a hang, etc. And, it doubles as a seat!

  2. #2
    GoldenBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-31-2007
    Location
    Upper Darby, PA
    Posts
    868
    Journal Entries
    63
    Images
    351

    Exclamation The link in the post above

    Does NOT take you to ATC, but to a URL with 'CUE'. I don't think this was a deliberate deception.

    Here's a link that takes you to the ATC:
    https://appalachiantrail.org/news/at...ge-containers/

  3. #3
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
    Join Date
    12-13-2004
    Location
    Essex, Vermont
    Age
    67
    Posts
    2,594

    Default

    I think it's inevitable. I use a canister most of the time, or an Ursack in less-travelled parts. A canister increases my base weight by a bit more than a day's worth of food. Just saw that they have new sizes, too, and Christmas is coming!

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    4,307

    Default

    The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee list has, for some reason, not included the Wild Ideas Bearikade products. Perhaps because those canisters have only proven effective against black bears. Of course, there are no grizzlies on the AT, so I see no reason to not use the bearikade even if the AT is using the IGBC list in their press release. Which I assume is fine since these are recommendations, not government mandates.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenBear View Post
    Does NOT take you to ATC, but to a URL with 'CUE'. I don't think this was a deliberate deception.

    Here's a link that takes you to the ATC:
    https://appalachiantrail.org/news/at...ge-containers/
    I fixed it. Both links go to the same place now.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-10-2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Age
    60
    Posts
    545

    Default

    So as I read the IGBC's list of approved containers, I understand that the Ursack IS approved. So this would be approved on the AT? Sorry to sound daft...just want to be clear.
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

  7. #7
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    55
    Posts
    4,836
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoSpirits View Post
    So as I read the IGBC's list of approved containers, I understand that the Ursack IS approved. So this would be approved on the AT? Sorry to sound daft...just want to be clear.
    At the moment, there is no "approved" and "not approved" by the ATC.
    The statement simply says they are promoting the use of IGBC approved canisters.

    As pointed out by others, things like the Bearikage would also be a good alternative and is approved in places such at Yosemite National Park that does REQUIRE bear cannisters. Of course Yosemite regulations provides a specific list of approved canisters (they don't simply provide a blanket statement such as 'all IGBC approved'). As such they do NOT like the Ursack because while it does prevent the bear from full access to the food, they can still "chew the bag" and get something of a reward.

  8. #8

    Default

    The only place on the AT where bear canisters are required is if you camp between Jarrad Gap and Neels Gap between March 1st, and June 1st. A bear canister isnít required if you hike through, but donít camp, in this section.

  9. #9
    Registered User Majortrauma's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-23-2009
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Virginia
    Age
    60
    Posts
    390

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoSpirits View Post
    So as I read the IGBC's list of approved containers, I understand that the Ursack IS approved. So this would be approved on the AT? Sorry to sound daft...just want to be clear.
    You're not being daft all. Keep in mind that the ATC can only make a recommendation, they may not mandate.
    No one (except a Ranger perhaps) is going to give you a citation or remove you from the AT if you choose to take a chance and not use a bear canister or not hang your food. Hikers need to take personal responsibility and be considerate of others who may be in the same area.
    I absolutely do NOT think it's the ATCs responsibility to provide bear boxes/cables; not their job.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-22-2015
    Location
    Cumming, GA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    132

    Default ATC takes official stand on bear canisters

    As much as I don't like the girth and weight of a cansiter, I have started carrying one on trails in GA, NC, and TN. It is just so convenient and saves so much time. Not to mention being a good seat!

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    4,307

    Default

    The Bearikade is a great product and the lightest of the Yosemite/SEKI approved canisters. I have a 12” Bearikade that weighs in at just over two pounds and I can fit seven days of food in it. For shorter segments on the AT where seven days is almost never necessary, they have smaller canisters as well. Aside from weight, the downside is the bulk. A canister won’t be comfortable in many frameless UL packs. It isn’t comfortable in my CDT, but is fine in my Circuit. I don’t think learning proper hanging is difficult but often there are no suitable trees and then you have to choose between a bad hang or sleeping with your food. I haven’t been able to get out much recently but I suspect that I’d opt to just take the Bearikade in the future since I already own it. Unless I know for sure that the campsites I’ll be using either have good trees or poles/cable systems. It does make life easier.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-10-2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Age
    60
    Posts
    545

    Default

    Being the gear-aholic that I am, I have collected and used every sort of food storage method I can think of -- hanging with silnylon drybags and then DCF sacks; "semi-hanging" with an Ursack, and finally also a Bear Vault. I use bear boxes or poles, etc when they are available or mandated. I have slept with my food on several occasions, but only when I've set up "off the beaten path" -- places that haven't been turned into Yogi Bear campgrounds -- or when I haven't been able to find an appropriate tree to hang. (Or, more often and most honest, when I haven't been able to throw the dang rock.)

    Once upon a time I had a good throwing arm, but those days are long gone. I don't try to kid anyone: hanging my food is almost the last option that appeals to me, and I have asked others for help so many times I'm not even embarrassed anymore.

    So using an Ursack has been a good option for me. I've only had the BV out with me once on a short trip -- and while I like it for several reasons, I dread trying to fit it into my pack routine.

    That being said, I'm glad the ATC has come out with the recommendation for hikers to start using hard-sided or IGBC approved containers. There are worse things in this world.
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-04-2017
    Location
    Central CT
    Age
    36
    Posts
    342

    Default

    It was the flying squirrels that got me to start using a canister and will never turn back. I've also admittedly and shamefully got at least 4 'throw sacks' and line of rope stuck in trees that I had to just cut as high as I could and let be. Two were on the AT and one was my very first shot back in 2017 at a campsite around here that I visit often, and have to look at it still there every time I go.

    I also got a Bearikade and love it, I just got the biggest one they make and take it even if out just overnight. Are there any good canisters that have a bigger capacity? .... I could probably fit 5-6 days of food the way I like to eat, and that's not including all the factory sealed stuff that doesn't go in.
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
    -
    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    1,029

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoSpirits View Post
    (Or, more often and most honest, when I haven't been able to throw the dang rock.)

    Once upon a time I had a good throwing arm, but those days are long gone. I don't try to kid anyone: hanging my food is almost the last option that appeals to me, and I have asked others for help so many times I'm not even embarrassed anymore.

    I too struggled to throw a rock for a PCT hang; many failures using the overhand throw method (what you'd use to throw a baseball). A great irony is that the best way for me to throw a rock for a PCT hang is to toss underhanded, like how the NBA's Rick Barry shot free throws ... which, though a superior technique of shooting free throws, almost no one else will do it because, that's right, it's embarrassing. It was called the "granny" method in my youth. Once I switched to that, I don't think it's ever taken me more than 2 tosses for any given rock or limb height.

  15. #15

    Default

    My guess is at some point some smart packmaker will build packs designed for cannisters. I envision a internal sleeve with an outside zippered flap, so that the cannister can be accessed without breaking down the pack.

    At BSP the backcountry campgrounds, Chimney and Russell had bear problems for decades, the park finally put in bear lines and the rangers at the sites made sure campers used them. It reportedly took 10 plus years for the bears to stop coming and on occasion they still come. On the other hand, AMC runs a campground in the whites in prime bear territory (13 falls), despite a bearbox and designated cooking area, the bears will still try to bluff charge their way into the designated cooking area when folks are cooking.

    I do not think cannisters will solve the bear issues at popular AT sites, I think at best it just means that hikers do not have their trips interrupted by losing their food. My guess is its going to take a combination of proper storage and selective culling of problem bears to deal with the issue. BTW bear issues reportedly used to be less when poachers were killing bears for their gallbladders and other reported medicinal's.

  16. #16

    Default

    Perhaps a pack building might start to do work on adding bear canisters into their packs. But there are so many possibilities now. Canisters come in several different sizes and even shapes. Holds enough for an over night for 1 or 2 people. Versus Holds enough for a hiker with 6 days of food. Then, Small, Medium, Large pack sizes and such. Very easy to suddenly have about 20 sizes to deal with. Cottage builders can probably adapt quick enough. But how many people go into REI and buy off the shelf.
    For a couple of bucks, get a weird haircut and waste your life away Bryan Adams....
    Hammock hangs are where you go into the woods to meet men you've only known on the internet so you can sit around a campfire to swap sewing tips and recipes. - sargevining on HF

  17. #17
    Registered User One Half's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-05-2010
    Location
    in a bus
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,691

    Default

    zpacks, at least on some models, offers a different top strap for putting a canister on top of your pack as an option.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-04-2017
    Location
    Central CT
    Age
    36
    Posts
    342

    Default

    my McHale Pack has straps to attach it under the top lid, he's got a good system... but my pack is so big I've just been putting it inside with plenty of room to spare. I actually have to keep it empty so I can stuff everything else around it since the canister is so tall.
    NoDoz
    nobo 2018 March 10th - October 19th
    -
    I'm just one too many mornings and 1,000 miles behind

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    4,307

    Default

    The problem with a canister on top of the pack is poor weight distribution if the canister has a lot of food in it. It’s better to have the heaviest items lower. Some hikers put their food in bags in their pack and then have an empty canister riding on top but that’s also a hassle.

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-01-2016
    Location
    Fargo, ND
    Age
    62
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Here are my questions/comments:

    I have never thru-hiked before; my longest hikes have been about a week. I can fit about 6 days worth of food into my Garcia can, or perhaps ~8 days into my extra-large Ursack. But I eat much less per day than a thru-hiker: my dinners are often simply half of the old 2.5-serving Mountain house packets, packed in zip-lock bags. Based on my reading of many posts about thru-hiking, I would guess that those folks eat perhaps almost double per day. Furthermore, thru-hikers are not getting the volume efficient packing of separately packaged freeze dried food; instead they are getting whatever they can find at a gas station or dollar general.

    My suspicion is that if bear cans become required on the AT, thru-hikers will carry one and grumble about it. But will they actually consistently fit all of their food (and other smellables) in it each night?

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •