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  1. #1

    Default Feeding hiking dogs

    I'm hoping for experienced hikers w/dog(s) to share ways they met the caloric needs of their pups. My dogs: large, experienced, strong, trained dogs. They are ALWAYS on leash, well-mannered (trailside sit-stay with me when any other hiker approaches), quiet/silent in tent/campground, and most important, their health/enjoyment controls whether we continue. My plans include supplementing kibble with dehydrated meat and olive oil for caloric boost. Any suggestions/experience would me most welcome. TIA

  2. #2

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    I'm sure there will be many recipes for a number of different types, size, age, and physical conditions of dog across the spectrum of trail buddies. Sorting out anecdotal information to determine what would be best for your dog can be difficult. What works well for a German Sheppard may not for an Australian Cattle dog on a day, week, or months long hike.

    As a thought, given the differences in breeds, age, and body needs of different dogs, along with individual differences within the same breed, your Veterinarian would probably be the best source of that information, especially if you are setting up a long distance trek. A Vet would provide more targeted, specific information for your dog than well intentioned general information that may not work well for other dogs and you'll have the benefit of a thorough physical to confirm the dog is able to do what you intend. That would make the recipe hunt a little easier to sort out for a diet matching or is close to what the Vet recommends.

  3. #3
    Registered User One Half's Avatar
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    I don't know who was providing it but at trail days there was a vet doing hiking dog wellness checks. Maybe a vet like this would be a good resource. IME most vets will say "don't hike with your dog" and "if you do, just give them extra kibble." This response is similar to what people get for advise from most doctors when they are doing endurance sports (or starting to). The thing is, this type of activity is not typically seen by vets (or docs) and thus they really don't know how to properly advise.

    Dogs, by nature, are meat eaters. So I would say the more protein you can get your dog the better. I am allergic to dogs but if I weren't (yes, even the hypo allergenic ones) I would have my dog on a real meat program, not the kibble you usually see. Some of the kibble is "high" in protein and would be a better choice for your four legged friend rather than the cheaper stuff. I think your idea to supplement his diet with fats is probably a good one. And then when in town I would go to a store and get him a couple of pounds of raw meat (assuming he can eat raw meat, many domestic dogs never have and it upsets their digestive systems now).
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    I'm sure there will be many recipes for a number of different types, size, age, and physical conditions of dog across the spectrum of trail buddies. Sorting out anecdotal information to determine what would be best for your dog can be difficult. What works well for a German Sheppard may not for an Australian Cattle dog on a day, week, or months long hike.
    Truth! The basic recipe of meat protein, fats, and dehydrated supplemental veggies is a staple, and my pups are happy with whatever combo I've tried so far. I'm looking for anecdotes to try! Thanks!

  5. #5

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    Thanks, One Half! Agree about most vets' responses. My pups get some pretty good kibble (and meat) at home, but those extra trail calories over the long haul may be tricky both for carrying volume and figuring the right amount for mail drops. My two will be looking forward to those town supplements for sure!

  6. #6

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    Back when I had a hiking dog, sometimes she didn't feel like eating at the end of the day. So I carried powdered cheese to sprinkle on her food to ensure she ate enough. I guess she manipulated me to bribe her with a treat of cheese.

  7. #7
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    Bird dogs and hounds are fed a high protein fat diet. Purina and Victor sell them. Look up Bird dog/hunting dog food and you will get an enriched diet for your dog.

  8. #8

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