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  1. #141

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Yeah, the three essentials: shelter, water, and food. Even beyond their obsession with weapons and defense strategies against the animals they fear, the whole survivalist thing is pretty ridiculous. Even armed with things like axes, big knives, bow and arrow, fishing gear, etc., a single human, alone and completely on their own, without an established base (dry, heated shelter) and gear in place to store and preserve food, has very little chance of surviving for any protracted length of time (more than a few months max). Perhaps it's possible in a year round warm climate with abundant natural food sources that can be foraged year round - maybe stranded on a tropical island where the fish jump in front of your spear and the coconuts fall from the palms. Otherwise, it's just an exercise in slowing the inevitable death by starvation and/or illness. Get past all that, and you can look forward to dying from loneliness.
    Yes, Mr. Hanks, but finding a plane to crash land on the island would raise your expenses considerably!

    Seriously, though, I expect them to catch him soon. Too many people are looking for him.

    "To make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from." - T.S. Eliot

  2. #142
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    Eric Rudolph lasted 5 years in the woods, less than 10 miles from his home, and with the help of no one. He was caught dumpster diving by a rookie cop behind a Bi-Lo's I think it was, in the middle of the night.
    Be Prepared

  3. #143
    Registered User JPritch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCloud View Post
    Eric Rudolph lasted 5 years in the woods, less than 10 miles from his home, and with the help of no one. He was caught dumpster diving by a rookie cop behind a Bi-Lo's I think it was, in the middle of the night.
    Rudolph from what I understand grew up in those mountains and spent considerable time in them and knew how to survive. Even with that knowledge he was forced to break into homes and dumpster dive to keep from starving. Laundrie has only backpacked a few days at a time. He's way farther down that learning curve than Rudolph and the odds are against his continued survival in the woods.
    While searching for that unknown edge in life, never forget to look home. For the greatest edge you can find in life is to stand in the protective shadow of those who love you.

  4. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Yeah, the three essentials: shelter, water, and food. Even beyond their obsession with weapons and defense strategies against the animals they fear, the whole survivalist thing is pretty ridiculous. Even armed with things like axes, big knives, bow and arrow, fishing gear, etc., a single human, alone and completely on their own, without an established base (dry, heated shelter) and gear in place to store and preserve food, has very little chance of surviving for any protracted length of time (more than a few months max). Perhaps it's possible in a year round warm climate with abundant natural food sources that can be foraged year round - maybe stranded on a tropical island where the fish jump in front of your spear and the coconuts fall from the palms. Otherwise, it's just an exercise in slowing the inevitable death by starvation and/or illness. Get past all that, and you can look forward to dying from loneliness.
    It seems common for survivalist fantasy seems to capture our imagination. It takes on many forms (Zombie apocalypse, Robinson Crusoe, Nuclear Winter, The Fugitive, Chris McCandless, Lost in Space, etc..). But the key word is "fantasy" as most is fiction and in reality, it only in very rare cases works out, the simple reason being that over 100,000 years of human evolution, pretty much every inhabitable place is already inhabited.

    Also, the "mighty hunter" who can sustain himself in the wild is more myth sustained by testosterone poisoning than reality. I saw an interesting documentary about a traditional hunter/gatherer tribe living in a tropical rain forest. The men would go out on multi-day hunting expeditions, come home with a kill, pound their chests, and boast about how they were providing for the village. When the anthropologists analyzed the tribe's diet, they found the vast majority of calories came not from the men's meager hunting trophies, but rather from the gathering, foraging, and farming done by the women when the men were away.

  5. #145
    Registered User NY HIKER 50's Avatar
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    Here's one no one ever thought of: As a former corroder boundary monitor there are two sides off the trail where no one will look. I knew that if something happened no one would find me. Get the message?

  6. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    It seems common for survivalist fantasy seems to capture our imagination. It takes on many forms (Zombie apocalypse, Robinson Crusoe, Nuclear Winter, The Fugitive, Chris McCandless, Lost in Space, etc..). But the key word is "fantasy" as most is fiction and in reality, it only in very rare cases works out, the simple reason being that over 100,000 years of human evolution, pretty much every inhabitable place is already inhabited.

    Also, the "mighty hunter" who can sustain himself in the wild is more myth sustained by testosterone poisoning than reality. I saw an interesting documentary about a traditional hunter/gatherer tribe living in a tropical rain forest. The men would go out on multi-day hunting expeditions, come home with a kill, pound their chests, and boast about how they were providing for the village. When the anthropologists analyzed the tribe's diet, they found the vast majority of calories came not from the men's meager hunting trophies, but rather from the gathering, foraging, and farming done by the women when the men were away.
    I sometimes watch the reality TV series, "Alone". Some of the contestants are marginal, but there are some who are very adept at woodcraft, hunting, fishing, foraging, etc. Last season, in British Columbia, the guy who won actually killed a deer, snared some rabbits, caught a few fish, etc. above and beyond his foraging - foraging being the overwhelming method of all the contestants securing food. He probably could have gone another month or so past the 79 days he needed to outlast (by not starving to death) the others and be the last one standing. Even so, he lost some 40 lbs. and was looking pretty rough. Every season has basically come down to who can go the longest without getting pulled for medical reasons or "tapping out", largely due to malnutrition. Such is the reality of actually trying to live off the land in the woods, even with a few tools (bow and arrows, axe, fishing line and hooks, sleeping bag, clothing, etc.). Humans are social creatures. We rely on others and the stuff they provide. When I think of living on the edge, I usually think of Dick Proenneke and his cabin on Lake Clark in Alaska. But even given his building, hunting, fishing, foraging, and garden skills, he relied on a good supply of tools, and even later on supplies that got flown in at fairly regular intervals. He also would leave for medical care, and stayed there less as he got older. Life in the wild is HARD.
    "That's the thing about possum innards - they's just as good the second day." - Jed Clampett

  7. #147

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    Thinking through the possibility that he's hiding out on the AT:

    The AT seems way too social to be a place to hide out. The AT continually routes hikers across roads and straight through towns, or at least near towns, where re-supply is available. Someone hiding out, of course, wouldn't want to be seen at a roadside crossing or in a trail town.

    During quieter times on the AT (like October--especially on weekdays), hikers would remember fellow hikers more, and would interact more. When I've only seen a few hikers in a day, I generally remember them--and they're more likely to interact/start a conversation at shelters, viewpoints, etc.

    During busier times on the AT (Oct. weekend with nice weather, or the recent holiday weekend), there are just too many people out--someone hiding out would be noticed. Any behavior out of the ordinary would also be noticed--and probably talked about. Conversations at shelters/camp often center around gear, plans, and other hikers.

    At any point on the AT, it's impossible to predict who you're going to pass on the trail. Could be a Scout group coming in the other direction, trail maintainer, forest or park ranger, family, or just an observant hiker.

    With a water filter and back-up, hydration wouldn't be a problem. Re-supply for food would be very difficult for someone trying to hide out and not be seen in a trail town. The idea of hunting for food seems remote too.

    They actually go on the AT in NY in this Inside Edition video (starting at 0:50):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-r5FT8HrpQ

    Sure, that survival guy can remain hidden behind a rock/branch near the trail. BUT, if a hiker saw someone emerge from the woods off-trail, they'd notice them. Maybe talk to them. Definitely remember them.And, staying in shelters wouldn't work. Too social and open. Hikers could show up or pass through any time. And, the logbooks provide a way to possibly track down folks who stayed there.
    Last edited by RiverbirchHiker; 10-16-2021 at 03:23.

  8. #148
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    Guy who kinda looks a little bit similar to Laundrie stopped at gun point by US Marshalls and handcuffed.

    https://nypost.com/2021/10/18/brian-...y-us-marshals/

  9. #149

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    That poor dude wasn't stopped..he was woken up from a nap. Oh Gosh that had to suck. Can you imagine what that guy went through for a half hour or so, "Hey you got the wrong guy!!!" Point of story is, if you are a baldish dude with a beard and plan to be in the woods in the Southeast, shave beard.
    " 6 bucks and my left nut says we're not going to be landing in Chicago" Del Griffith

  10. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by RiverbirchHiker View Post
    Thinking through the possibility that he's hiding out on the AT:

    The AT seems way too social to be a place to hide out. The AT continually routes hikers across roads and straight through towns, or at least near towns, where re-supply is available. Someone hiding out, of course, wouldn't want to be seen at a roadside crossing or in a trail town.

    During quieter times on the AT (like October--especially on weekdays), hikers would remember fellow hikers more, and would interact more. When I've only seen a few hikers in a day, I generally remember them--and they're more likely to interact/start a conversation at shelters, viewpoints, etc.

    During busier times on the AT (Oct. weekend with nice weather, or the recent holiday weekend), there are just too many people out--someone hiding out would be noticed. Any behavior out of the ordinary would also be noticed--and probably talked about. Conversations at shelters/camp often center around gear, plans, and other hikers.

    At any point on the AT, it's impossible to predict who you're going to pass on the trail. Could be a Scout group coming in the other direction, trail maintainer, forest or park ranger, family, or just an observant hiker.

    With a water filter and back-up, hydration wouldn't be a problem. Re-supply for food would be very difficult for someone trying to hide out and not be seen in a trail town. The idea of hunting for food seems remote too.

    They actually go on the AT in NY in this Inside Edition video (starting at 0:50):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-r5FT8HrpQ

    Sure, that survival guy can remain hidden behind a rock/branch near the trail. BUT, if a hiker saw someone emerge from the woods off-trail, they'd notice them. Maybe talk to them. Definitely remember them.And, staying in shelters wouldn't work. Too social and open. Hikers could show up or pass through any time. And, the logbooks provide a way to possibly track down folks who stayed there.
    All good points. I think being on the AT just increases his chances of being caught for all the reasons you mention. He may be hiding in the woods somewhere that he is familiar with other that the AT but even then he will be forced to come out of hiding to obtain food at some point. It could be that the "camping trip" his family when on was actually a ruse so they could to drop off supplies at some location where he was intending to hide out.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  11. #151

    Exclamation Manhunt for Brian Laundrie; some think he could be in Appalachians

    We have a group of internet sleuths working on trying to find BL. If anyone has gear or food stolen on the AT can you let us know here? COuld be an indication of someone hiding out on trail. Thanks so much.

  12. #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    I sometimes watch the reality TV series, "Alone". Some of the contestants are marginal, but there are some who are very adept at woodcraft, hunting, fishing, foraging, etc. Last season, in British Columbia, the guy who won actually killed a deer, snared some rabbits, caught a few fish, etc. above and beyond his foraging - foraging being the overwhelming method of all the contestants securing food. He probably could have gone another month or so past the 79 days he needed to outlast (by not starving to death) the others and be the last one standing. Even so, he lost some 40 lbs. and was looking pretty rough. Every season has basically come down to who can go the longest without getting pulled for medical reasons or "tapping out", largely due to malnutrition. Such is the reality of actually trying to live off the land in the woods, even with a few tools (bow and arrows, axe, fishing line and hooks, sleeping bag, clothing, etc.). Humans are social creatures. We rely on others and the stuff they provide. When I think of living on the edge, I usually think of Dick Proenneke and his cabin on Lake Clark in Alaska. But even given his building, hunting, fishing, foraging, and garden skills, he relied on a good supply of tools, and even later on supplies that got flown in at fairly regular intervals. He also would leave for medical care, and stayed there less as he got older. Life in the wild is HARD.
    Watch the excellent movie, "Alpha", if you want to see what can go wrong on a hunting trip. The guy couldn't get back home fast enough!

    Synopsis found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpha_(2018_film)

    "To make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from." - T.S. Eliot

  13. #153
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    Partial human remains and some of Laundrie's stuff found at Myakkahatchee Park:

    https://nypost.com/2021/10/20/articl...ature-reserve/

  14. #154

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    Well I guess this thread is coming to an end.
    " 6 bucks and my left nut says we're not going to be landing in Chicago" Del Griffith

  15. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    Partial human remains and some of Laundrie's stuff found at Myakkahatchee Park:

    https://nypost.com/2021/10/20/articl...ature-reserve/
    I for one hope that's all that remains!

  16. #156
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    Start looking through the woods and you never know what you're going to find:

    https://policetribune.com/the-hunt-f...QiHsrr_NX2iHOI
    Be Prepared

  17. #157
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    Hopefully he hasn't turned into a serial killer & killed someone near the swamp & threw his personal items in to throw everyone off!? Remember, there were 2 girls that camped with him & Gabby in Moab that were murdered?. I wonder what is happening with that investigation?
    Take Time to Watch the Trees Dance with The Wind.....Then Join In

  18. #158

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    I'm going to bet the remains are NOT him.
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  19. #159

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    I guess this thread isn't going anywhere. I liked the post earlier that was moved here about someone having some internet sleuths looking around. What constitutes an internet sleuth? I remember when Inchworm went missing that thread was pages long, but people from the site actually went to help out in the search. Has any internet sleuth been out looking for this guy?

    Quote Originally Posted by wornoutboots View Post
    Hopefully he hasn't turned into a serial killer & killed someone near the swamp & threw his personal items in to throw everyone off!? Remember, there were 2 girls that camped with him & Gabby in Moab that were murdered?. I wonder what is happening with that investigation?
    I completely missed that story.
    " 6 bucks and my left nut says we're not going to be landing in Chicago" Del Griffith

  20. #160

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Half View Post
    I'm going to bet the remains are NOT him.
    I'd take your bet but it wouldn't be fair. FBI matched his dental records.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
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