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A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Some backpacking loads were very light back in the day. Peruse the fine two volume set "Hiking The Appalachian Trail" and you'll find some outstanding gear pics.

    Attachment 48471
    Here is Jim Shattuck's tent set up in 1966. That's a minimal one person shelter---and the pack is very light with a minimal harness system.

    Attachment 48472
    Here is Giger's kit from 1969(photo by Andrew J. Giger).

    Attachment 48473
    Here is Allen's kit from 1960(photo by Owen F. Allen).
    Thanks Tipi good stuff! just look at all those ultralight gear! It looks like those are aluminum pans...?

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    Ultralight has become relatively common these days, but it's not new.
    Yep! as im learning! Thanks CalebJ

  3. #43

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    I'm really impressed with that Giger setup, even though the gear is old it rivals modern day UL backpackers in its minimalism and attention to weight. I noticed that he made sure to include a first aid kit as well.

  4. #44
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    Colin Fletcher "the Complete Walker" was my inspiration after I got out of the military in '81 and picked up my old boy scout pack. I also loved his "The man who walked through Time". Th only 2 other writers I thought were in his caliber were Ed Abbey and Jon Krakaur (His early stuff). I still use Fletcher's term of "Gear Festooned Across Your Pack" and still harden my feet with rubbing alcohol before longer hikes.
    .....Someday, like many others who joined WB in the early years, I may dry up and dissapear....

  5. #45

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    Last year I read a biography of Horace Kephart titled Back of Beyond, a thoroughly documented book about this key figure in Smoky Mountain history, wherein was referenced a camping tome written by Thomas Hiram Holding that was published in 1908. Holding was British and apparently UL had taken hold across the pond sometime before, and Kephart was corresponding regularly with him and was enthralled with the concept of traveling lightly in the woods.

    Holding's book has the scintillating title The Camper's Handbook. I've ordered it and it should be an interesting read.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  6. #46

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    Fletcher stands out as an inspiration even today, not necessarily for his gear, but for his writing and his attitude: clear, bold and opinionated.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBoswell View Post
    Fletcher stands out as an inspiration even today, not necessarily for his gear, but for his writing and his attitude: clear, bold and opinionated.
    No doubt. The Complete Walker was the backpacking bible for a good long while, and I think I still have a copy of the third edition in a box somewhere, along with Freedom of the Hills (I think edition two).
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Last year I read a biography of Horace Kephart titled Back of Beyond, a thoroughly documented book about this key figure in Smoky Mountain history, wherein was referenced a camping tome written by Thomas Hiram Holding that was published in 1908. Holding was British and apparently UL had taken hold across the pond sometime before, and Kephart was corresponding regularly with him and was enthralled with the concept of traveling lightly in the woods.
    I wonder how untralight worked back then. They were using heavy canvas for tents and other items. Someone can put me right on what was used as light shelter unless it was built from trees.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by NY HIKER 50 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Last year I read a biography of Horace Kephart titled Back of Beyond, a thoroughly documented book about this key figure in Smoky Mountain history, wherein was referenced a camping tome written by Thomas Hiram Holding that was published in 1908. Holding was British and apparently UL had taken hold across the pond sometime before, and Kephart was corresponding regularly with him and was enthralled with the concept of traveling lightly in the woods.
    I wonder how untralight worked back then. They were using heavy canvas for tents and other items. Someone can put me right on what was used as light shelter unless it was built from trees.
    I don't know... it might start off with "First, you chop down 3 spruce trees...."
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  10. #50
    Registered User Hikes in Rain's Avatar
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    Some of the did pretty well at "ultralight" for over 100 years ago. If you read Woodcraft and Camping by Nessmuk (George Washington Sears), the author makes the claim that his canoe, extra clothing, blanket-bag, two days rations, pocket axe, fishing rod and backpack never exceeded 26 lb. That weight had to be in the summer season, and even then I take it with a grain of salt, but we're not talking huge weights here considering the materials available then. Definitely not leave-no-trace, but not at all bad considering the type of materials. And the book does caution for conservation; he laments the destruction of a favorite campsite due to overuse. Here's a link to a description of some of his gear: https://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/201...rsnessmuk.html

  11. #51
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    Default Colin died from being hit by a vehicle

    I was waiting to see if someone knew of how Colin died. He was a past backpacking hero of mine, so I kept up with him and his books. Very unfortunately, he was struck by a vehicle while 'walking' near his home in Monterey, CA. He walked everywhere he could, and he got hit. That was in 2001 and he never recovered from his injuries, which were blamed on his death in 2007. That is like the Triple Crowner who took his grandson to a soccer game and got hit by lighting. Life, and if your waiting for it to be fair, you just lost.
    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    This was a great read.. Never heard of him but his life story was is one for the ages.

    https://www.adventure-journal.com/20...n-backpacking/

    Attachment 48467

  12. #52
    Registered User Hikes in Rain's Avatar
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    I did know that. Very sad, and not fair. Should have been on a trail, gone to bed and woke up dead. But as you pointed out, life isn't.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hikes in Rain View Post
    Some of the did pretty well at "ultralight" for over 100 years ago. If you read Woodcraft and Camping by Nessmuk (George Washington Sears), the author makes the claim that his canoe, extra clothing, blanket-bag, two days rations, pocket axe, fishing rod and backpack never exceeded 26 lb. That weight had to be in the summer season, and even then I take it with a grain of salt, but we're not talking huge weights here considering the materials available then. Definitely not leave-no-trace, but not at all bad considering the type of materials. And the book does caution for conservation; he laments the destruction of a favorite campsite due to overuse. Here's a link to a description of some of his gear: https://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/201...rsnessmuk.html
    I think the key word here is canoe. Unless he porteged it some miles.

  14. #54

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    Regarding Nessmu--everyone knows about Horace Kephart. His winter pack weight was between 50-60 lbs---his sleeping bag weighed 8 lbs.

    https://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/201...e-kephart.html

  15. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by No Match View Post
    Very unfortunately, he was struck by a vehicle while 'walking' near his home in Monterey, CA. He walked everywhere he could, and he got hit. That was in 2001 and he never recovered from his injuries, which were blamed on his death in 2007.
    Whenever people tell me I'm crazy for running off into the woods by myself, I tell them that the most dangerous part of the trip is just getting to the trailhead.

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnycat View Post
    Whenever people tell me I'm crazy for running off into the woods by myself, I tell them that the most dangerous part of the trip is just getting to the trailhead.
    I agree, this and crossing roads while hiking.

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonnycat View Post
    Whenever people tell me I'm crazy for running off into the woods by myself, I tell them that the most dangerous part of the trip is just getting to the trailhead.
    Quote Originally Posted by Seatbelt View Post
    I agree, this and crossing roads while hiking.
    Crossing the Palisades Parkway in NY at rush hour can be an unforgettable AT experience. Route 7 in VA is said to be pretty bad as well. There used to be an equally dangerous one in NJ, but I think the crossing was rerouted - I forget which highway it was.
    "That's the thing about possum innards - they's just as good the second day." - Jed Clampett

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by NY HIKER 50 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Last year I read a biography of Horace Kephart titled Back of Beyond, a thoroughly documented book about this key figure in Smoky Mountain history, wherein was referenced a camping tome written by Thomas Hiram Holding that was published in 1908. Holding was British and apparently UL had taken hold across the pond sometime before, and Kephart was corresponding regularly with him and was enthralled with the concept of traveling lightly in the woods.
    I wonder how untralight worked back then. They were using heavy canvas for tents and other items. Someone can put me right on what was used as light shelter unless it was built from trees.
    I can't find my book about Gramma Gatewood but evidently on her first hike she carried a shower curtain. Not sure if that was her tent or sleeping bag.

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by dm1333 View Post

    I can't find my book about Gramma Gatewood but evidently on her first hike she carried a shower curtain. Not sure if that was her tent or sleeping bag.
    We all know about that. She was increadable.

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Crossing the Palisades Parkway in NY at rush hour can be an unforgettable AT experience. Route 7 in VA is said to be pretty bad as well. There used to be an equally dangerous one in NJ, but I think the crossing was rerouted - I forget which highway it was.
    I complained about this to the NY/NJ Trail Conference. I tried crossing and a car sped up on purpose and got in the lane where I was crossing I now walk about .5 to 1 mi. to the crossing near the bookstore. The Parkway necks down there and it's a little safer. Anyone else?

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