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A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    no doubt tipi is a throwback backpacker... but 100 lbs is a bit too much..
    Not sure about "throwback" but there are modern backpackers carrying tremendous loads for long duration trips.

    One is Tully Henke who pulled a 40 day backpacking trip in Russia with no resupply and with a 95 lb pack.

    https://backpackinglight.com/packing...y-tully-henke/

    His best quote is this---

    "Instead of the desire to carry less and go further, (it's)the desire to carry more and go longer."


    Amen, brother. I call it Expedition Backpacking.

    Other excellent quotes are these---

    "Instead of shaving weight to have the lightest pack possible, you choose the heaviest pack youíre willing to carry and go backwards from there to see how many days you can spend in the wilds."

    "We all have different goals in our adventures. Some of us want to move fast, some far, some light. Iíve found that one of the things I value most is the time I spend in the mountains and the woods and even a tent. Sometimes that means packing differently and sometimes that means working hard and slow and pausing to let it all soak in."

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    no doubt tipi is a throwback backpacker... but 100 lbs is a bit too much..
    Oh how you underestimate uncle fungus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    no doubt tipi is a throwback backpacker... but 100 lbs is a bit too much..
    A bit too much for...?
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    ** Compass 5oz. I never carry a compass but then I don't go overland like Fletcher and make my own trails and use a map to come up with routes.
    11g for my little compass. I bring it along even if I am sticking to a trail, and it can be very useful before heading off trail to set up camp, along with making sure you picked the right trail after a fork (of course this assumes.

    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    is it by any chance TikTok?
    I had to dig through my history for the name, it was a personality cult site called "thetrek". I only learned of it and guthooks recently, but once my blood pressure started to spike I knew enough to quickly close the page.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NY HIKER 50 View Post
    He carried fifty pounds of gear. Those days are over! He carried a svea stove. I had to divest myself in favor of alcohol. He also said to find a blank area on a map and go in to see what's there. No chance of that today. Some of it is now outdated. Meat bars are unavailable for "Flecher stew". Times have changed.

    What I found interesting is that while he did question the idea of ultralight backpacking, he would incorporate some lightweight options. In desert climates he used a poncho/tarp as rain gear and shelter. Today it would be a Gatewood Cape. And in another trip discussion he wrote about his "tin can kitchen", utilizing a recycled steel food can as a kettle with a wood fire. Shades of a beer can pot and Ray Jardine fire. He always documented the weight of each item, so he was concerned about weight. Fletcher was was an interesting contradiction for me. Outwardly, he disliked ultralight but yet...........

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    I did say that this was outdated. No one wears waffle stompers any more unless they are in a situation that requires them *trail runners now). Fly reel? Need a license in most places. Yep, we've come a long way. If you're using an internal frame pack you could soon be in trouble. Yes, it's a good idea to carry an extra buckle though. Mint cake? We can do much better today. I simply use napkins from restaurants for tp. Today most of us use soda bottles (I started using the well before Ray. Catskills anyone?) And that's all from me for now.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoSpirits View Post
    A bit too much for...?
    strictly speaking for Me! ...you dont see that often that kind of weight been hauled around, at least I haven't seen it. It does not mean that there aren't any people who do.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Not sure about "throwback" but there are modern backpackers carrying tremendous loads for long duration trips.

    One is Tully Henke who pulled a 40 day backpacking trip in Russia with no resupply and with a 95 lb pack.

    https://backpackinglight.com/packing...y-tully-henke/

    His best quote is this---

    "Instead of the desire to carry less and go further, (it's)the desire to carry more and go longer."


    Amen, brother. I call it Expedition Backpacking.

    Other excellent quotes are these---

    "Instead of shaving weight to have the lightest pack possible, you choose the heaviest pack you’re willing to carry and go backwards from there to see how many days you can spend in the wilds."

    "We all have different goals in our adventures. Some of us want to move fast, some far, some light. I’ve found that one of the things I value most is the time I spend in the mountains and the woods and even a tent. Sometimes that means packing differently and sometimes that means working hard and slow and pausing to let it all soak in."
    Thanks for info Tipi!
    I dont deny that there are backpackers who do that but aside from expeditions who have to that kind of loads how many hikers carry such loads?

    PS I dont mean any negative connotation when I say "throwback" but what I mean is yesteryear ultralight dint exist per se, loads were much heavier..

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    "Instead of the desire to carry less and go further, (it's)the desire to carry more and go longer."
    "Instead of shaving weight to have the lightest pack possible, you choose the heaviest pack you’re willing to carry and go backwards from there to see how many days you can spend in the wilds."

    "We all have different goals in our adventures. Some of us want to move fast, some far, some light. I’ve found that one of the things I value most is the time I spend in the mountains and the woods and even a tent. Sometimes that means packing differently and sometimes that means working hard and slow and pausing to let it all soak in."


    I also believe these quotes have more in common with Campers not backpackers, why would you carry more to go less further... unless im misinterpreting the meaning..

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    Oh how you underestimate uncle fungus.
    Yeah, in the beginning he gets under your skin sometimes and might smell a little funny - but he grows on you.
    "That's the thing about possum innards - they's just as good the second day." - Jed Clampett

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    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    "Instead of the desire to carry less and go further, (it's)the desire to carry more and go longer."
    "Instead of shaving weight to have the lightest pack possible, you choose the heaviest pack you’re willing to carry and go backwards from there to see how many days you can spend in the wilds."

    "We all have different goals in our adventures. Some of us want to move fast, some far, some light. I’ve found that one of the things I value most is the time I spend in the mountains and the woods and even a tent. Sometimes that means packing differently and sometimes that means working hard and slow and pausing to let it all soak in."


    I also believe these quotes have more in common with Campers not backpackers, why would you carry more to go less further... unless im misinterpreting the meaning..
    If you don't get it by now no one can explain it to you. Think it's about the journey not the destination and maybe some luxury items of course.

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    The second paragraph says it all!!

  13. #33
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    Fletcher obviously carried loads larger than what would be considered normal today, largely do to the tech and materials available in his day. But as Tipi Walter noted, he was no ultra-lighter even in his day, and would also carry pounds upon pounds of what could be considered somewhat optional and/or back-up stuff - but then cut the handle off his toothbrush to save a few grams. Proving, if anything, in some ways he was as crazy as the rest of us.
    "That's the thing about possum innards - they's just as good the second day." - Jed Clampett

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    This summer a friend of mine and I decided to make our ultralight gear seem a little ironic and carry 95 lbs (43 kg) on our backs.

    Tully is a bad example, he only did it once, seems like an experiment. Tipi is the exemption..

    Again, this post was to honor Colin Fletcher, a backpacking icon, not compare Tipis weigh loads(JNI64)! How some of you knuckleheads take the context of these threads to bolster you egos is pretty FU!

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    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    This summer a friend of mine and I decided to make our ultralight gear seem a little ironic and carry 95 lbs (43 kg) on our backs.

    Tully is a bad example, he only did it once, seems like an experiment. Tipi is the exemption..

    Again, this post was to honor Colin Fletcher, a backpacking icon, not compare Tipis weigh loads(JNI64)! How some of you knuckleheads take the context of these threads to bolster you egos is pretty FU!
    Thank you for the kind comments, same to you!

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    Thanks for info Tipi!
    I dont deny that there are backpackers who do that but aside from expeditions who have to that kind of loads how many hikers carry such loads?

    PS I dont mean any negative connotation when I say "throwback" but what I mean is yesteryear ultralight dint exist per se, loads were much heavier..
    Some backpacking loads were very light back in the day. Peruse the fine two volume set "Hiking The Appalachian Trail" and you'll find some outstanding gear pics.

    Jim-Shattuck-1966.jpg
    Here is Jim Shattuck's tent set up in 1966. That's a minimal one person shelter---and the pack is very light with a minimal harness system.

    Andrew-Giger-1969.jpg
    Here is Giger's kit from 1969(photo by Andrew J. Giger).

    Allen-and-Gregory-1960.jpg
    Here is Allen's kit from 1960(photo by Owen F. Allen).

  17. #37
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    Tippi Thanks for the Posting of the Backpacking light post and this picture from that book. Gives much to think about with Fletcher. I really never cared what other people carried for weight.Still dontthats totally up to them. People who hiked the trail in the 70 and 80 I like to hear and see what they carried that interests me..I was a teen back then and backpacking...
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  18. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by FŽanor View Post
    PS I dont mean any negative connotation when I say "throwback" but what I mean is yesteryear ultralight dint exist per se, loads were much heavier..
    Ultralight has become relatively common these days, but it's not new.

  19. #39
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    What parking lot is he in?
    Be Prepared

  20. #40
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    based on the light blue wood sign over his right shoulder I'm thinking somewhere along the BRP
    Be Prepared

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