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  1. #21

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    It's a stationary/round trip/circular slackpack really. Sometimes hikers use a service to go both forwards and backwards along the trail, returning to the same point where their pack is. I have seen this offered as slackpacking. The intent is to drop all those items that you expect to not need on a day hike that you are ordinarily carrying for overnight. Semantics aside, the gist of it is the dropping of weight which is sometimes criticized negatively.

    For a NOBO or even a flip-flopper whose last day is on Katahdin, shouldn't be a big deal physically whether you use a day pack or your regular pack. If you are a SOBO with little hiking experience or understanding of a profile map maybe consider taking a day pack. Not saying you will get your ass handed to you if you don't, but heading home after your first day, well, that would be unfortunate given your hopes and dreams.

    There's no official pack weight on the AT.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
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  2. #22

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    Pre-existing condition is extremely broad. The articles don't say what it is. I have ITB that affects my knee, have had shoulder surgery, back surgery, previously had atrial fibrillation. None of that precludes me from hiking. Without getting into the details, I am certified to do more than that by more than one doctor. Not enough information provided as to whether this fellow was prepared enough.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
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  3. #23

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    My pure speculation based on "preexisting injuries," not conditions is that the hiker got injured somehow on the first day and convinced himself that he could camp overnight and complete the trek to the summit the next day. The next day he then got dehydrated (easy to do on the upper trail) and that was what precipitated the actual rescue.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    My pure speculation based on "preexisting injuries," not conditions is that the hiker got injured somehow on the first day and convinced himself that he could camp overnight and complete the trek to the summit the next day. The next day he then got dehydrated (easy to do on the upper trail) and that was what precipitated the actual rescue.
    good distinction and good points. I'd not noticed the "injuries"....just read what my brain thought it should say.
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  5. #25
    Registered User Water Rat's Avatar
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    In this instance it is probably a good thing he had his pack with him because he spent 60 hours on the mountain. He most likely needed the extra warmth at night, as well as the food in his pack. These things bought him some time and saved him from being in worse shape.

    Though, if he had left his pack on the porch at the Katahdin Stream Ranger Station or signed-in at the base of the Hunt Trail, it is doubtful he wound have spent 60 hours on the mountain. The rangers would have known to look for him at the end of day 1 when he did not sign himself off the trail, or when he didn't show up to collect his pack.

    There are definite lessons to be learned here... The main thing is he was safely removed from the mountain and is lucky enough to have the opportunity to learn from his mistakes.

  6. #26

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    Oh okay 3 out of the 4 I listed for me are injuries but mostly semantics again injuries is a subset of condition. Some part of his body was injured sometime before his hike. He could have been in a car accident a few years ago or last week. Not enough information to suggest he did anything he shouldn't have in regard to it. I would think if he got injured on the way up they would have said that but who knows, the articles are pretty lacking. The articles linked don't say he even had a full pack only that he stayed overnight.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
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  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Water Rat View Post
    In this instance it is probably a good thing he had his pack with him because he spent 60 hours on the mountain. He most likely needed the extra warmth at night, as well as the food in his pack. These things bought him some time and saved him from being in worse shape.
    Though, if he had left his pack on the porch at the Katahdin Stream Ranger Station or signed-in at the base of the Hunt Trail, it is doubtful he wound have spent 60 hours on the mountain. The rangers would have known to look for him at the end of day 1 when he did not sign himself off the trail, or when he didn't show up to collect his pack.

    There are definite lessons to be learned here... The main thing is he was safely removed from the mountain and is lucky enough to have the opportunity to learn from his mistakes.
    I read both linked articles in post #1, and neither one said he had his pack with him.

  8. #28
    Registered User Water Rat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    I read both linked articles in post #1, and neither one said he had his pack with him.
    True, but if he had left his pack on the porch at the ranger station they would have noticed an overdue hiker and started a search Thursday evening. They check their porch and the hiker sign-in sheet in the evenings. They do go looking for overdue hikers.

    If he had a site reserved, then early morning would most likely have been too early to check-in to his site.

    That doesn't leave too many options for where his pack could be other than on his person. Well, unless he ditched it along the way.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Water Rat View Post
    True, but if he had left his pack on the porch at the ranger station they would have noticed an overdue hiker and started a search Thursday evening. They check their porch and the hiker sign-in sheet in the evenings. They do go looking for overdue hikers.

    If he had a site reserved, then early morning would most likely have been too early to check-in to his site.

    That doesn't leave too many options for where his pack could be other than on his person. Well, unless he ditched it along the way.
    Without more info, assuming he had a pack with him is still just speculation.

  10. #30
    Registered User Water Rat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    Without more info, assuming he had a pack with him is still just speculation.
    Without more info, the majority of this thread is speculation. I was simply explaining the reasoning behind my answer.

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Water Rat View Post
    Without more info, the majority of this thread is speculation. I was simply explaining the reasoning behind my answer.
    Your comment:

    In this instance it is probably a good thing he had his pack with him because he spent 60 hours on the mountain. He most likely needed the extra warmth at night, as well as the food in his pack. These things bought him some time and saved him from being in worse shape.”

    seems to clearly indicate that you accepted as true that he had a pack with him.


  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    Your comment:
    In this instance it is probably a good thing he had his pack with him because he spent 60 hours on the mountain. He most likely needed the extra warmth at night, as well as the food in his pack. These things bought him some time and saved him from being in worse shape.”

    seems to clearly indicate that you accepted as true that he had a pack with him.
    Yes, I do believe that to be true based on the reasons I have given. Yes, it is speculation on my part.

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