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  1. #1

    Default Odor Proof Food Storage Bags with Slider Zip-Lock?

    Are there any *inexpensive* odor-proof food storage bags that have a zipper slide lock?

    Oven bags are odor proof and UL, but you pretty much do a spin, fold, and twist tie on them that isn't as convenient.

  2. #2
    Registered User ldsailor's Avatar
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    Smelly Proof bags have a Ziploc closure - not a zipper slide lock. There are various sizes available. I don't know what you consider "inexpensive" but you can check them out here and judge for yourself. I used them on a 4 day hike just last week. Hard to know if they are really effective against wildlife. I certainly couldn't smell what was inside. Like most Ziploc closure bags (except Ziploc bags themselves), after awhile the Ziploc closure tends to pull away from the bag.
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  3. #3

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    I don't think there's a slider bag out there that reliably seals moisture, much less odor.

  4. #4
    Registered User Maineiac64's Avatar
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    Seems like the opsaks are worth it, large size is durable, holds a good amount of food, I take 2, one for trash but I probably could get away with a ziplock for that.

  5. #5

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    Here's some Smelley Bag promo material and it includes a video etc.Although I use one I would think my procedures are less than perfect and the Ursack I place it in has been corrupted with odors from my hands etc so many times that they would know it's there.
    https://smellyproof.com/blog/2019/4/...ut-to-the-test

  6. #6

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    Oder proof bags for the purpose of hiding scent from a bear are a placebo IMO. (google search on bears sensitivity) (2100 times that of a human?!). But I love them for not grossing me out on a multi-trip with trash scents from prior meals or such. OpSaks are the best I've used for that but the zippers are still problematic even after all these years.

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    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
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    like Patman I use the opsak as a garbage bag. Point blank bears can smell 5000 times more than we can and your Ursak is useless as well Black bears just tore one up last week in the Smokeys properly hung..Shredded it...Yeah so forget it...
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  8. #8

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    Useless isn't really accurate. Just don't get in the mindset that it's preventing bears from smelling it entirely. If it reduces the scent by, say, 50% - that's still massively limited the range at which an animal can smell it. Your population of potential concerns is proportionately reduced.

    I don't own/use one. But there is certainly a good argument for them as one piece of your system.

  9. #9
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    Useless isn't really accurate. Just don't get in the mindset that it's preventing bears from smelling it entirely. If it reduces the scent by, say, 50% - that's still massively limited the range at which an animal can smell it. Your population of potential concerns is proportionately reduced.

    I don't own/use one. But there is certainly a good argument for them as one piece of your system.
    Let me see what part did you miss about shredded ursack properly hung in the smokeys. From what i can tell you just like to argue. Do me a favor avoid me in the real world and also online. Thanks.
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  10. #10
    Registered User Crossup's Avatar
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    Hobbs, since you think this is reasonable favor to ask, please extend the same courtesy to me as I certainly dont need your attitude or opinion here or on the trail.

    [QUOTE=hobbs;2286638 Do me a favor avoid me in the real world and also online. Thanks.[/QUOTE]

  11. #11

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    Interesting response. Moving along...

  12. #12
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    Are Opsaks completely odor PROOF? Would you trust it with a kilo going through customs? If not, you have your answer.

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    "That's the thing about possum innards - they's just as good the second day." - Jed Clampett

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    Registered User Crossup's Avatar
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    I agree the so called no odor bag is a worthwhile addition, I've had bears in camp a couple times and my take is they go for the strongest and most desirable scents. Case in point was at Blackburn Center where I had food in the tent but the majority was hung on the bear pole with everyone elses. The bear was obviously interested and attracted by the hung food, which was high up and subject to having the odor spread easily by wind vs food in my tent on ground level (and admittedly, bears probably are looking for something besides Lifesaver gummies). This was a bear known to hang around the area and I had been told of sightings the evening before. As the first one up that day I had the honor of scaring him off by showing myself. Had a similar experience at Canaan Valley, the bear was having a field day with peoples coolers and after failing to actually get hold of any food, finally took an interest in our picnic table trash can(obviously the smelliest thing around). Rather pissed the resort people neglected to mention the bear which had been there for days despite being chased by rangers with rubber bullets.

    All this tells me minimizing your food odor foot print is the smartest approach and thats not hard to do with some thought- but as you say dont expect to succeed 100% and even if you do, some one else can still attract a bear to your area while following protocol.


    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    Interesting response. Moving along...

  14. #14
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    Agree that odor barrier bags are of value. Also consider this perspective. You hike all day with a bag of smelly food packed in you backpack with your clothes and sleeping bag. By the end of the day, you are going to sleep in that now smelly bag and clothes. Or you could do what I do and use the small odor barrier bag as a food bag liner and the large one as a pack liner. There are now two odor barriers between my food and my clothes/sleeping bag. Is it 100% effective? Probably not. But to then conclude it is a placebo is making the wrong comparison. You don't compare my bag to one that zero odor. ,You compare my bag to one permeated with odors had I not used the odor barriers. I know I could smell food odors in my pack before I started using the odor barrier bags, siou can be sure the bears did. Also it is just one tool. One of your best best defenses is to smell like a human. The goal is to increase your odor and minimize your food odor.

    Or you could take the other argument to it's logical conclusion. Since my shoes don't protect my feet from all injuries, I should not wear shoes. My raincoat doesn't keep out every drop of water so I shouldn't use a raincoat. My filter only removes 99.999% of bugs. Since it isn't 100% it serves no purpose.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Agree that odor barrier bags are of value. Also consider this perspective. You hike all day with a bag of smelly food packed in you backpack with your clothes and sleeping bag. By the end of the day, you are going to sleep in that now smelly bag and clothes. Or you could do what I do and use the small odor barrier bag as a food bag liner and the large one as a pack liner. There are now two odor barriers between my food and my clothes/sleeping bag. Is it 100% effective? Probably not. But to then conclude it is a placebo is making the wrong comparison. You don't compare my bag to one that zero odor. ,You compare my bag to one permeated with odors had I not used the odor barriers. I know I could smell food odors in my pack before I started using the odor barrier bags, siou can be sure the bears did. Also it is just one tool. One of your best best defenses is to smell like a human. The goal is to increase your odor and minimize your food odor.

    Or you could take the other argument to it's logical conclusion. Since my shoes don't protect my feet from all injuries, I should not wear shoes. My raincoat doesn't keep out every drop of water so I shouldn't use a raincoat. My filter only removes 99.999% of bugs. Since it isn't 100% it serves no purpose.
    This. Or that since seatbelts don’t prevent all car accident deaths there’s no point in wearing them.

  16. #16

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    "odor proof" bags are a misnomer really. If using these for trash, TP, and food waste, they work more or less so other people don't smell these things as they are packed out. However, odor proof really does not exist in the wild. For example, bears have 7-times greater sense of smell than bloodhounds so very little escapes their "smell-vision".

    What can be done however is to use "odor proof" bags/containers and lace them using scents animals don't like such as peppermint oil, onions, garlic, cinnamon, and other such things that won't damage your food but can repel all kinds of critters who would otherwise smell food from significant distances.

  17. #17
    Registered User Maineiac64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbs View Post
    like Patman I use the opsak as a garbage bag. Point blank bears can smell 5000 times more than we can and your Ursak is useless as well Black bears just tore one up last week in the Smokeys properly hung..Shredded it...Yeah so forget it...
    If it was properly hung how did the bear get it?

  18. #18
    Registered User hobbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maineiac64 View Post
    If it was properly hung how did the bear get it?
    well thats what"s funny it needs to be hung on a branch by what the Company said to the indivual had hung it that way. The indivdual that it happened to which Iam presuming is new to backpacking and Ursacks was warning evryone not to buy one. BTW it was the Almighty that was shredded. It was funny cause all the UL hikers were the ones defending the URsack and coming up with excuses and theories. The fact is it hasnt met standards in some national parks and the ADIrondaks..The bear also got three other food bags hung
    My love for life is quit simple .i get uo in the moring and then i go to bed at night. What I do inbween is to occupy my time. Cary Grant

  19. #19

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    What does an Allmitey have to do with the conversation about odor proof storage bags?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    "odor proof" bags are a misnomer really. If using these for trash, TP, and food waste, they work more or less so other people don't smell these things as they are packed out. However, odor proof really does not exist in the wild. For example, bears have 7-times greater sense of smell than bloodhounds so very little escapes their "smell-vision".

    What can be done however is to use "odor proof" bags/containers and lace them using scents animals don't like such as peppermint oil, onions, garlic, cinnamon, and other such things that won't damage your food but can repel all kinds of critters who would otherwise smell food from significant distances.
    You will notice in my post I'd did not call them odor proof but rather odor barrier. The point is that some plastics are better at blocking odors than others, the most common plastic, polyethylene, has poor odor blocking properties. I have not seen any studies to show that some food scents repel wildlife. In contrast, most advice is to put all odiferous products (such as mint flovored toothpaste) in your bear bag. Bears are omnivorous after all. Also they are probably smart enough to figure out that a bags that smells of onions usually have yummy things in it, even if they don't like onions. After all, it has been shown that bears are actually attracted to bear spray (apparently they like spicy food). It it's effective as a repellent because (as Tom Smith puts it) just because they like to eat it, it doesn't mean they like to have it sprayed up their nose. To take stops to increase the food odors of you food bag seems counterproductive.

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