WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1

    Default I am sweaty when I sleep... am I doing something wrong?

    I notice when I sleep I am sweaty. I don’t feel cold or hot, I feel very comfortable. I notice I get clamy or slurpy sweaty.

    If it’s 45* or less I sleep in long underwear and long sleeve smart wool. Colder than 40 I might toss on a micro grid fleece.

    I use a pad with a R3 value and a 20* quilt.

    I feel like if I create a draft or vent my quilt I get cold. Does this mean I am a “warm sleeper”?

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioHiker View Post
    Does this mean I am a “warm sleeper”?
    Not if you wear long baselayers at 45F with a 20F quilt, and a grid fleece at 40F! How could you NOT be sweating?!?

  3. #3

    Default

    I need to try wearing less cloths. Just don’t want to be cold I guess.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,078

    Default

    Try covering your extremities: gloves, beanie/hood, down or oppossum wool socks.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-19-2008
    Location
    Thurmont, MD
    Posts
    211

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Try covering your extremities: gloves, beanie/hood, down or oppossum wool socks.
    Are you breathing into your bag? That causes condensation & sweat.

  6. #6
    Leonidas
    Join Date
    04-26-2016
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    Posts
    1,047

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioHiker View Post
    I need to try wearing less cloths. Just don’t want to be cold I guess.
    If you get cold, put on a layer. Depending on how late you eat before bed, your body is ramped up producing heat. As the night goes on, you cool down. Personally, I find it better to go to bed in less and put on more if/when the situation requires. But if being sweaty is comfortable for you, I guess I wouldn't worry too much. I personally hate waking up sweaty at home or on trail.
    AT: 471 mi
    Benton MacKaye Trail '20
    Pinhoti Trail '18-19'

    @leonidasonthetrail https://www.youtube.com/c/LeonidasontheTrail

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JC13 View Post
    But if being sweaty is comfortable for you, I guess I wouldn't worry too much.
    I agree with that for a night or two, but if you're out for several days it's a different story. The sweat can affect the insulating ability of the quilt/bag. Two sweaty nights followed by a third at a lower temperature could be a miserable experience.

  8. #8
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    5,484
    Images
    2

    Default

    If the quilt insulation is down, depending on the baffling you may be able to shift insulation to the sides for warmer nights. My EE down quilt has a nice "open square" baffling system that lets me shift the down in both directions.

    And I agree you're wearing a lot of warm clothing for that much insulation.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OhioHiker View Post
    I notice when I sleep I am sweaty. I don’t feel cold or hot, I feel very comfortable. I notice I get clamy or slurpy sweaty.

    If it’s 45* or less I sleep in long underwear and long sleeve smart wool. Colder than 40 I might toss on a micro grid fleece.

    I use a pad with a R3 value and a 20* quilt.

    I feel like if I create a draft or vent my quilt I get cold. Does this mean I am a “warm sleeper”?
    Some have circulation problems or disorders like Raynauds that may affect extremities/and digits the most. For example, Anish or myself may benefit from wearing beanie/hood, warm dry socks and gloves/mittens and keep the torso and lower body less bundled up so we don't get sleep sweaty. I found this out sleeping in a quilt when venting or experiencing a draft as my sleep style is from side to side all night. I'm not uncomfortably cold or hot when the sleep wear apparel layers are appropriately in balance with extremity accessorizing.

    Some drugs like blood pressure, diabetic, pain, and anti depressant/ psyche meds also make people run hot. https://www.goodrx.com/blog/medicati...g-side-effect/
    In men low testosterone, low blood sugar, anxiety, hormone imbalances, and sleep apnea can make for a sweaty night. So it's not just gear or over dressing that can be the culprit of a sweaty night. https://www.healthline.com/health/wh...-sweats-in-men. As a family experience my diabetic sleep apne over wt(obese) dad and sis, on recently prescribed high blood pressure meds, wake up drenched without so much as bed sheet over them wearing light sleepwear. I personally have made it lifestyle goals to avoid these conditions by maintaining a narrow standard of health including guarding against anxiety, depression, worry, etc. Maybe you can try relaxing more before sleep or addressing causes. Try cooling foods before turning in perhaps with peppermint or chamomile tea, dandelion greens and most other leafy greens, a banana, noshing a cuke or radishes.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-17-2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    62
    Posts
    4,860

    Default

    When I go to bed, I always lie on top of my quilt until I cool down. I can feel my metabolism is ramped up from camp chores, eating, hiking, etc when I go to bed. If I crawl into my quilt right away I get sweaty. It's amazing how long you can lie out with no blankets on a cold night before you cool down. It's very relaxing.

  11. #11
    Leonidas
    Join Date
    04-26-2016
    Location
    Birmingham, Alabama
    Posts
    1,047

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Some have circulation problems or disorders like Raynauds that may affect extremities/and digits the most. For example, Anish or myself may benefit from wearing beanie/hood, warm dry socks and gloves/mittens and keep the torso and lower body less bundled up so we don't get sleep sweaty. I found this out sleeping in a quilt when venting or experiencing a draft as my sleep style is from side to side all night. I'm not uncomfortably cold or hot when the sleep wear apparel layers are appropriately in balance with extremity accessorizing.

    Some drugs like blood pressure, diabetic, pain, and anti depressant/ psyche meds also make people run hot. https://www.goodrx.com/blog/medicati...g-side-effect/
    In men low testosterone, low blood sugar, anxiety, hormone imbalances, and sleep apnea can make for a sweaty night. So it's not just gear or over dressing that can be the culprit of a sweaty night. https://www.healthline.com/health/wh...-sweats-in-men. As a family experience my diabetic sleep apne over wt(obese) dad and sis, on recently prescribed high blood pressure meds, wake up drenched without so much as bed sheet over them wearing light sleepwear. I personally have made it lifestyle goals to avoid these conditions by maintaining a narrow standard of health including guarding against anxiety, depression, worry, etc. Maybe you can try relaxing more before sleep or addressing causes. Try cooling foods before turning in perhaps with peppermint or chamomile tea, dandelion greens and most other leafy greens, a banana, noshing a cuke or radishes.
    Interesting, I wasn't aware low T lent itself to night sweats.
    AT: 471 mi
    Benton MacKaye Trail '20
    Pinhoti Trail '18-19'

    @leonidasonthetrail https://www.youtube.com/c/LeonidasontheTrail

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2006
    Location
    Melbourne,Australia
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,819

    Default

    It really isn't all that complicated...
    "If it’s 45* or less I sleep in long underwear and long sleeve smart wool. Colder than 40 I might toss on a micro grid fleece.

    I use a pad with a R3 value and a 20* quilt."
    If I had a 20f quilt over me at 45 plus, I would be sweatting too.

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2006
    Location
    Melbourne,Australia
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,819

    Default

    It really isn't all that complicated...
    "If it’s 45* or less I sleep in long underwear and long sleeve smart wool. Colder than 40 I might toss on a micro grid fleece.

    I use a pad with a R3 value and a 20* quilt."
    If I had a 20f quilt over me at 45 plus, I would be sweatting too as I would at 40f and possibly 30f...

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2006
    Location
    Melbourne,Australia
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,819

    Default

    BTW, one day some expert will figure out that many have too warm sleeping bags because they are used to the weight of blankets at home and miss that weight with light down bags in the wild.

  15. #15

    Default

    Adjust clothing or vent (stick a leg or arm out) or remove hat or socks or sleep on top of the quilt or whatever it takes until you're not hot any more, then gradually start adding stuff as you cool down.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  16. #16

    Default

    FWIW and probably worth a try - Having had a similar problem, I bring a washcloth with me and use it just before retiring, wiping down my face, arms, chest, and legs with cold water. Evaporation helps to cool the body and I've found I can sleep better without the trail grime of dirt and sweat from the days walk. More importantly, it stops the light sweating that becomes uncomfortable during the night.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •