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  1. #1
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    Default Side Sleeper Sleeping Bags

    I'm looking for a sidesleeper sleeping bag that's also lightweight. I've been researching the Big Agnes Sidewinder but wonder if there are any others to compare with. Or are there any of you who are side sleepers who found a great side zipper bag that works for you. Thanks in advance.
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    For me, it's not the zipper position as much as the fill strategy. Many ultralight bags are designed with more insulation on the top than the bottom. As such, when I roll from side to side or just roll onto my side, if my bag moves with me, my back gets cold. I find it easier to avoid sleeping directly on a side zipper than to avoid having a slim cut, ultra-light bag turn with me as I roll to my side. Also, a mummy style hood is an issue if my bag stays flat and I turn inside it.

    All these thoughts lead me to suggest a quilt might be a best answer. . . and with a little fiddling during the night, I generally get along okay, if not great, with whatever I have in either a bag or a quilt.

    Good luck.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  3. #3
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    I am a side sleeper and just got a quilt this winter for the upcoming season. It works great for side sleeping and gives me coverage as I flop from side to side without getting twisted up inside a mummy bag. In addition, I sleep with my legs spread all over the place and am no longer confined to the limits of the mummy bag. 20 degree down quilt is lightweight and packs down small.

    Perfect on test nights in the living room. Did a 40 degree night last week under an open tarp wearing a L/S wool t-shirt w/hood, light socks, and my briefs and was comfortable all night.

    Last month did a 30 degree night with a closed up tarp in heavy snowstorm wearing L/S wool t-shirt w/hood, wool cap, light socks, and long lightweight underwear. I did use the provided straps to mate it with my sleeping pad to avoid drafts, cinched down the collar and foot openings. I was comfortable all night and could easily see taking this quilt down to its 20 degree rating.

    If all your camping is above freezing I think you could find a quilt to easily meet your needs. If you camp below freezing it just takes a bit more planning on setup and depends on how cold you sleep and how the quilt is rated (remember women often sleep colder than men).

    Plenty of good vendors out there and this is where I got mine. If you decide on a quilt research or ask questions about the different options.
    https://www.warbonnetoutdoors.com/pr...t-zip-footbox/

  4. #4

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    I have three different mummy bags and have never been comfortable in any of them. I very recently bought a 30F Katabatic Palisades quilt in wide width and when I roll around, I am finally comfortable. The width is part of it, the other part is the ingenious attachment system used to connect the quilt to the sleeping pad.

    I have only tested sleeping in the backyard. One night to 25F and I was toasty in my baselayer, neck gaitor, and hat. Second night down to 17F required me to put the puffy on at about 3 am but the coyotes making a racket made going back to sleep difficult but I was not cold. I am sold on quilts for 3 season anyway.

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    Wow, a quilt is something I never thought about but sounds like a very good option. Thank you both for that info. I'm generally a warm sleeper even in very cold conditions. I do kick and move a lot so maybe the quilt will give me more comfort than the traditional mummy style bags I've been using all these years. I will check out warbonnet!
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    Thanks. I think based on the replies a quilt will be a better option for me.
    Happy Lifetime Sectioner!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Namaste View Post
    I will check out warbonnet!
    You might also look at https://enlightenedequipment.com/

    Their website had a lot more research information under their Support menu that helped in educating yourself about quilts, temp. ratings, features and stuff. They were on my short list and I ultimately went with Warbonnet based on prior good experience with their tarps and able to get a camo color choice that matched my tarp (vanity). In my research I felt both companies were equally good, similar product, and similarly priced.

  8. #8
    Registered User JNI64's Avatar
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    I started out with mummy bags too, but being a tossing turning, flip flopping ,side sleeper it didn't take me long to move to quilts.

    My summer quilt is the 50 degree Costco quilt and my winter quilt is the hammock gear 0 degree burrow with an extra 4oz of feathers.

  9. #9
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    Just another vote for a quilt, from a life-long side sleeper. I got sold on them 4-5 years ago or so.

    There is a slight "learning curve" on using quilts, at least there was for myself.

    As Big Dog said, Katabatic Gear (my quilt too, but the 21F Alsek) has a good attachment system for keeping the quilt in place on cold nights, preventing side-drafts. Warmer nights, I don't bother with it. Our EE double quilt also has little attachment clips. Make sure whatever quilt you buy has some sort of side-attach thingies. I get by fine with the regular width.

    Katabatic gear stuff is expensive, EE is a better deal, but I think their ratings are optimistic (like a EE "20" is more like a 30 or so, maybe not quite that extreme). You can get down added to EE quilts, I believe. A couple ounces makes a big difference. We added 4 ounces of 800-fill down to our EE double quilt.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Namaste View Post
    I'm looking for a sidesleeper sleeping bag that's also lightweight. I've been researching the Big Agnes Sidewinder but wonder if there are any others to compare with. Or are there any of you who are side sleepers who found a great side zipper bag that works for you. Thanks in advance.
    100% side sleeper I've switched to the BigA sleep system bags. Having the bag attached to pad was a game changer for me. I have a Big A, down, Anvil Horn zero and a Lost Dog synthetic 30. I flop from side to side all night. It's like sleeping in a regular bed. I think my zero is 3 lbs. The 30 is lighter.

  11. #11

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    Another side sleeper here. I also made the switch to a quilt if above 20 degrees. Below 20 and I go back to my mummy. I've tried the Enlightened Equipment quilt and the katabatic Flex. I was much warmer in the Katabatic. I also got a wide to eliminate any cold spots since I toss a lot. Even with the straps for my pad, there were still cold spots when I turned. A wide eliminated these.

  12. #12
    Registered User Crossup's Avatar
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    Another option to a mummy bag is the spoon shape designed to accommodate side sleepers while minimizing weight and size, its basicly cut larger around the top areas and taper more aggressively from the knees down. I have a Nemo Disco 30 and a 15 is also made. Pretty good price/weight and works as advertised. I've used mine 4 years on the AT and am happy enough to not think about other bags.

  13. #13

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    Western Mountianeering Terralite

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