WhiteBlaze Pages
A Complete Appalachian Trail Guidebook.
$10 for printed copy(paperback). $6 for interactive PDF. $2 for printable PDF.
Read more here WhiteBlaze Pages Store

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 36 of 36
  1. #21
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    65
    Posts
    4,528
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    I haven't thought about it that way but you're right that maybe the mindset is different from the beginning knowing that it will be a longer hike.
    I hadn't either, but yeah, a totally different feeling thinking, at least, that you'll be out for quite a while. I had that situation last year starting the PCT pre-Covid, planned on 2 months, then wham the pandemic blossomed and it wound up being only a week. During that single week, before I knew how bad the pandemic situation was, I was already in the wonderful long-distance mental state, or nearly there.

    But if it's only a planned 2-weeks or so, I don't get into that glorious long-distance hike mind set. 3 or 4 weeks planned, maybe.

    I like this for a definition of a LASH. If you get into the "zone", it's a LASH.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-10-2006
    Location
    So-California
    Age
    56
    Posts
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    All these definitions are arbitrary but if the question is when I start to feel like I'm in full "thru hiker mode", the answer for me is about two weeks. There's a big difference between a one week hike and a three week hike in terms of mindset. ...
    Thanks Coffee and everyone else. My "best ever" backpack trip was the John Muir Trail at just over 2 weeks. The last night at Guitar Lake was really bittersweet as I felt I had really hit stride and wished I could keep going. It will probably be easier to swing a couple three-week trips each year than one four-week trip.

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    4,157

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimqpublic View Post
    Thanks Coffee and everyone else. My "best ever" backpack trip was the John Muir Trail at just over 2 weeks. The last night at Guitar Lake was really bittersweet as I felt I had really hit stride and wished I could keep going. It will probably be easier to swing a couple three-week trips each year than one four-week trip.
    I had a similar experience southbound on the JMT in 2013. At the PCT/JMT junction near Crabtree meadow, I wanted to keep hiking the PCT to Mexico rather than summit Whitney and then end my hike. So two years later I started on the PCT at the Mexican border and it was a huge milestone when I again stood at that same JMT/PCT junction hiking northbound. Unfortunately my PCT thru turned into a LASH but I didn’t yet know that at the time.

  4. #24

    Default

    Duration and intensity are trade-offs. You can go longer, happily, if you take it easy. But hard charging hikes are rough on you physically and mentally, especially if you are not young. I think it's foolish and stupid to commit to a very long hike and then be stuck with it, sort of like being in jail (as a PCT thru hiker put it to me one day).

    I've stopped doing running events that went on after I wanted to stop (I used to run ultramarathons; lately half marathons are enough). Same thing with hiking. I spent a month in Virginia a few years ago, and that was plenty. More recently I did a hard 10 day section of the PCT, and got my fill no question.

    So the question is, how much is enough for you to get your fill. Doing any more than that is optional IMO.
    (Many hiker do way way too much and it shows in their personality, all they will discuss is how many more miles, and what they are going to eat next).

  5. #25
    PCT, Sheltowee, Pinhoti, LT , BMT, AT, SHT, CDT 560 miles 10-K's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-30-2007
    Location
    Erwin, TN
    Age
    59
    Posts
    8,497

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Duration and intensity are trade-offs. You can go longer, happily, if you take it easy. But hard charging hikes are rough on you physically and mentally, especially if you are not young. I think it's foolish and stupid to commit to a very long hike and then be stuck with it, sort of like being in jail (as a PCT thru hiker put it to me one day).

    I've stopped doing running events that went on after I wanted to stop (I used to run ultramarathons; lately half marathons are enough). Same thing with hiking. I spent a month in Virginia a few years ago, and that was plenty. More recently I did a hard 10 day section of the PCT, and got my fill no question.

    So the question is, how much is enough for you to get your fill. Doing any more than that is optional IMO.
    (Many hiker do way way too much and it shows in their personality, all they will discuss is how many more miles, and what they are going to eat next).
    You said it better than I did, thanks.

    For so many years I enjoyed hiking for months plus. Then I felt compelled to because dammit I'm a hiker. One day it dawned on me that I could just do what I felt like doing and feel good about it.

  6. #26

    Default

    Knowledge is power. Knowing that you can go home without being a quitter frees you up to start longer trips. Why not plan a month just in case? You can always go home after a week if you've had enough, but having to go home before you're ready just because you didn't schedule a longer trip sucks. I hate reaching the "end" and wanting more

    For the past few years I have started SOBO on the Cohos Trail (NH) with a plan that would allow me to complete the entire trail. So far I've always been done for one reason or another by the time I get to Stark. Didn't stop me from planning for the entire trail again this year though. Who knows? Maybe this year I'll keep going. Hike what makes you happy and call it whatever you want!
    ďThe man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...Ē~Henry David Thoreau

    http://lesstraveledby.net
    YouTube Channel
    Trailspace Reviews

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-03-2015
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Age
    68
    Posts
    91

    Default

    It's well worth going south from Stark.

  8. #28

    Default

    Last year the lack of water made me stop. The Killkenney was really dry. Well everywhere was really dry heh and that is why I didn't want to risk it. I could have loaded up with as much water as I could carry an hope I made it, but it didn't seem wise. The first year I went really late and it was getting really icy and colder than I had gear for. When it is right it will be great I am sure, but I really love the north end of the trail. Sometimes you don't see people for days if you are lucky!
    ďThe man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...Ē~Henry David Thoreau

    http://lesstraveledby.net
    YouTube Channel
    Trailspace Reviews

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-03-2015
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Age
    68
    Posts
    91

    Default

    Ahhh the Killkenney. Very dry and the stories I could tell.

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-10-2006
    Location
    So-California
    Age
    56
    Posts
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RockDoc View Post
    Duration and intensity are trade-offs.
    ...So the question is, how much is enough for you to get your fill. Doing any more than that is optional IMO.
    ...
    There's the rub. I have no idea. In the past 35 years I've had 4 weeks off work twice and 3 weeks maybe four times. My longest distance backpacking trip was 220 miles on the John Muir Trail and my longest duration was 3 weeks with the family when kids were 9 & 11.

    I like the idea of starting off on a trail with a direction in mind. If I decide to take a week off in every town that appeals to me then ok. The AT will be new on many fronts- I've only backpacked or camped near the west coast and my trips to the east coast have been few and short. It's entirely possible that I decide 3 weeks is enough and 0 weeks is enough in heat and humidity. On the other hand I might flip/flop, find myself at Springer in November and decide to keep walking to Pensacola. I just don't know but want to find out.

    I think 4 weeks off work, probably 3-1/2 weeks hiking, is a good goal for 2022. 2021 is still up in the air- COVID and my youngest is off to college -somewhere- in the fall. (Waiting for acceptances now).

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-17-2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    62
    Posts
    4,890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LoneStranger View Post
    The length of a LASH is personal and depends on the size of your A...
    Best reply of the year.

  12. #32
    Registered User Bubblehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-06-2015
    Location
    Port Orange, Florida
    Age
    59
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I figure 3-4 weeks of hiking or about 200 miles to be a LASH...that seems to be the time/distance to get to "thru hiking shape"...IMO...
    AT LASH GA to VA 2016
    AT LASH VA to NY 2017
    AT LASH NY to NH 2019
    AT LASH NH to ME 2021 ???

  13. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-16-2013
    Location
    warner robins ga
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bubblehead View Post
    I figure 3-4 weeks of hiking or about 200 miles to be a LASH...that seems to be the time/distance to get to "thru hiking shape"...IMO...
    I am a section hiker only to date. And I have section hiked anywhere from 3 days to 15 days.
    My experience is, regardless of distance, you don't get your trail legs until the day before you reach the end . . .

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-14-2020
    Location
    Evanston IL
    Age
    58
    Posts
    305

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smithjv View Post
    I am a section hiker only to date.
    You should be open to marriage or a more committed relationship....

  15. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-21-2013
    Location
    Springfield, PA
    Age
    60
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Heading out for a SASH (4 days, 50 miles) this week.

  16. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-28-2010
    Location
    Montgomery, AL
    Posts
    160

    Default

    My 2 cents:
    - Section hike: anything > 1 night on AT
    - LASH: section hike long enough to require a resupply

    Not that it really matters. Just get out there and hike.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •