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  1. #21
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    I'm 6'2" but don't get claustrophobic and don't mind slight dampness from touching a wall (but sure don't like actual leaks or poor water quality).

    I checked out the Tarpent Rainbow (thanks for the recommend). It looks good (bathtub floor, which I really like) but is fairly heavy. Around three pounds (or more if I had to add poles since I don't carry tekking poles).

    I'm still leaning towards Nemo Hornet 1 or 2 - at around two pounds and at the halfway point in the price range) but will continue looking, and before making a decision will definitely look at the Copper Spur and Hubba Hubba again.

    All the good input here is encouraging, knowing there are so many tents pleasing experienced hikers, but also overwhelming in that there are so many good choices. This may be a golden era of relatively affordable, quality shelters. So many companies surely won't make it forever? They'll have to be some mergers and some failures, so that options will be fewer later. (This insight from one who got his worst college grade in Econ.)

  2. #22

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    Yeah, I'm a little confused by the idea that they're half the price...

  3. #23
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    For variety of reasons I decided to ditch my Tiger Wall. After looking around a LOT I decided on the Tarptent Double Rainbow. I can't wait for it to arrive and see it up close and personal!

  4. #24
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    [QUOTE Big Sky sold by a equipment rental company. It's a very similar design to the other free standing tents but costs half the price. It came in excellent condition and I've used it once on a 5 night shake-out hike where it performed well. It weighs about 2 1/2 pounds which is a tad over the average but for the $140 price (including shipping) I feel like I did ok[/QUOTE]

    To be clear, the tent is a Big Sky Soul 1 person purchased used from Lower Gear. I just checked their web site and it looks like this no longer available from them. I do think it's a well designed and constructed basic tent.

  5. #25
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    After full consideration of your experiences, thoughts, and comments, I've reached my first decision-making point.

    I've eliminated this shelter from consideration:

    Tent Cot.jpg

  6. #26
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    Larger size.

    Tent Cot.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #27
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    Well, heck, I can't get it large enough to see. It's a "tent cot."

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roper View Post
    Well, heck, I can't get it large enough to see. It's a "tent cot."



    there's a beavis and butthead joke in this one.......

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roper View Post
    . . . I'm still leaning towards Nemo Hornet 1 or 2 - at around two pounds and at the halfway point in the price range) but will continue looking, and before making a decision will definitely look at the Copper Spur and Hubba Hubba again. . .
    For mostly fair to moderate weather, the Hornets are great tents by most users' experiences. But, if the weather turns to blowing rain, the reduced coverage of the raised sides on the rain fly make the small vestibules almost useless in protecting your gear and the tent's inner sidewalls have a reputation for getting wet. Both the BA CS and the Hubba Hubba offer significantly more robust weather protection at the cost of a bit more material (i.e. weight) in the fly. And in a really serious blow, the MSR tents are some of the only 3-season tents on the market that don't sew any support loops to mesh alone, making them the gold standard for structural durability, again, paid for with a slight weight penalty.

    Personally, I'd suggest you save your money and a lot of weight and use just a tarp. They really are super versatile and work exceptionally well.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  10. #30
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    Both the BA CS and the Hubba Hubba offer significantly more robust weather protection at the cost of a bit more material (i.e. weight) in the fly


    i used a hubba hubba for a few years and it's a great tent....

    never got water inside, and i liked how roomy it was (solo for me)....

    but, it was heavy at like over 5 pounds all in.....

    i tried the hubba and it was just too much of a coffin for me.......

    i still use the hubba hubba for car trips and canoe trips...

    used a fly creek 2 for a bunch of trips and while it was light, i didn't like the front
    entry and for a 2 person tent, it was also a touch small.....

    bought a double rainbow right before my hiatus started so havent used it yet....

  11. #31

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    Personally been very happy with Big Agnes tents. Started out with Seedhouse 2, then Flycreek 1 for the past 7 years, and just bought a Tigerwall 1.

  12. #32

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    My 8 or so year journey from Amicalola Falls to Damascus as a section hiker: Outfitted locally w big three - tent was 5+ lbs. Learning curve kicks in. Reactionary (understandable&#129315 purchase is CS UL1. Loved weight reduction - too small, only one door. CS UL2 has been perfect balance of weight and space for me. Feels palatial w everything I section hike with kept inside at night over last 300 miles.😁

  13. #33
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    By "CS UL2" you mean a Copper Spur 2, right? (Just making sure, as I'm unfamiliar with a lot of routine hiking acronyms.)

    Appreciated the commentary about the Nemo Hornet, above (modest water issues in high winds). That's helpful to know.

    Still haven't decided but probably down to between the Copper Spur and Nemo Hornet. Not yet sure whether to go with a 1-person or 2-person version, but leaning towards the latter.

    Thanks again for all the helpful insights.

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roper View Post
    By "CS UL2" you mean a Copper Spur 2, right? (Just making sure, as I'm unfamiliar with a lot of routine hiking acronyms.)

    Appreciated the commentary about the Nemo Hornet, above (modest water issues in high winds). That's helpful to know.

    Still haven't decided but probably down to between the Copper Spur and Nemo Hornet. Not yet sure whether to go with a 1-person or 2-person version, but leaning towards the latter.

    Thanks again for all the helpful insights.
    Before making your final decision, I would recommend adding the Tiger Wall 2 to your comparison. Opportunity to save over half a pound, and you will be carrying that weight every mile you hike.

  15. #35

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    Good thread...I’ve also been considering a free-standing tent and top of my list is the Tiger Wall. Astro, how do feel in the 1 person? Does it feel like a coffin?

  16. #36
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    I had eliminated the Tiger Wall early on because it was more expensive. But I see now that it may be in the same range, at least through some retailers. Also, it seems to have thin fabric (hence the low weight) rather than my desired tub floor, but I'm not sure the Copper Spur or Nemo Hornet differ in that regard. I'll look again.

    It does seem possible to get a good to excellent 2lb to 3lb freestanding tent at or close to my desired price range of $200 to $300 (extended up to $400, if necessary). But I'm not sure any of the options have tub floors. Only the tarp tents may offer all three. I think.

  17. #37
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    here's a few closeups of my copper Spur UL 1....

  18. #38
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    Copper Spur UL 2. Easy setup at 5:00am while the birthday girl slept. Took about 5 minutes without instructions first time. Perfect for one person with extra room for stuff. Really cozy for two people, no extra room, watch your pad sizes.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Roper View Post
    . . .But I'm not sure any of the options have tub floors. Only the tarp tents may offer all three. I think.
    I'm pretty sure all the tents you're looking at have "bathtub floors". It's pretty standard in modern tents. If you're hard on gear then the ultra-light fabrics and zippers can be an issue. If you are the only one using your gear and you are gentile with it, the lighter fabrics and zippers shouldn't be a big issue . . . they will reduce your tent life, but several good years vs. several good decades is normally within reason to save a few pounds for many of us.

    Good luck and have fun.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  20. #40
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    There are multiple good options, often only differentiated by a few dollars, a few ounces, slightly different construction. So much good input here (thank you!) that it all became rather overwhelming (again). So I came up with a bit of a comparison chart (pasted below). The top two choices seem to be Copper Spur 1 (no negatives, that I've heard of) and Nemo Dragonfly 1 (relatively little said about it but seems comparable. I think I've eliminated the Nemo Hornet (blowing rain issue) and MSR Hubba Hubba (weight and shorter length). I'm inclined to go with a tent rather than tarp, because I've always used them, like them, and am most comfortable with them.

    So, likely going to choose the Copper Spur 1.

    The info (weights obtained from makers for comparison purposes; actual weight on trail (due to humidity, water retention, etc.) will usually be more.

    1. Tents – Less durable than tarps (or, if durable, heavier), light to moderate weight, often more water tight, less roomy. I’m accustomed to these, often freestanding (or semi), most set up quickly, easily.

    Copper Spur – $380 (1-person) 2.2 lbs; 88 inches; $450 (2-person) 2.12 lbs, 88 inches
    Nemo Dragonfly - $360 (1) 2.0 lbs; 88 inches; $400 (2) 2.9 lbs, 88 inches
    Nemo Hornet - $330 (1) 1.10 lbs, 87 inches long; $370 (2), 1.15 lbs, 85 inches.
    MSR Hubba - $380 (1) 2.7 lbs, 85 inches; $450 (2) 3.8 lbs, 84 inches

    2. Tarp tents – Durable, light, single wall (possible condensation issues), somewhat expensive (especially adding poles, since I don’t have or use trekking poles); seem especially suited to long distance (thru) hiking, more roomy.

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