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  1. #1

    Default Summer Rain Gear

    I'm in Missouri, the weather is so unpredictable that people say if you don't take rain gear you will get rained on. I have exaggerated that you need to have rain gear during a drought. Our weather in summer is hot and humid so a heavy waterproof layer makes sweat

    I used a circa 1998 Eddie Bauer rain jacket for years that weighed around 3 pounds. I finally replaced it with a Columbia Evapouration jacket that's 12.8 ounces.

    I like the jacket, it's great as a fall to spring jacket, but I want one for summer that's much lighter.

    If you couldn't get Frogg Toggs (they're already on my list) what would you get?

    1. Something that compresses down really tight and is well under 12 ounces.
    2. I like zip up jackets, not pull over ponchos, but item #1 is more important.
    3. it needs to be durable. I don't want one that is targeted to frequent replacement as a business model
    4. I might spend money for the right product, show me all price tiers

  2. #2

    Default

    buy your 3 season rain jacket,,, In summer hot and humid wear nylon type fishing shorts and shirts that basically dont absorb water,, then just embrace the suck...
    really once you are soaked through,, its really not that bad.

  3. #3

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    I'm generally on the same page as Dropdeadfred. Once the weather is warm enough that being wet isn't a safety concern, rain gear isn't on my packing list. Wearing it causes me to sweat so much that I might as well ignore it in the first place and just enjoy walking in the rain.

    Below about 55-60* it's absolutely part of my kit. And a wind layer that can block a brief burst is a good idea at all times just because the wind stopping ability alone is enough to justify the weight, and staying dry for a few minutes is an added bonus.

  4. #4

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    I use an UL umbrella and carry it on all trips. It keeps 3/4ths of me mostly dry and the rain out of my face. I also like having it around camp so I'm not stuck in the tent. Yes, it's not going to work in some situations and I do carry a rain jacket for some trails.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martinb View Post
    I use an UL umbrella and carry it on all trips. It keeps 3/4ths of me mostly dry and the rain out of my face. I also like having it around camp so I'm not stuck in the tent. Yes, it's not going to work in some situations and I do carry a rain jacket for some trails.
    Ditto! I'm going to get one of those umbrella clips from Zpacks for my chrome dome use in hot weather.I always carry at least a Frogg Togg just in case I get wet and the wind comes up or something.The umbrella plus the lightweight Frogg Togg probably push the scale at a combined weight of 13.5 oz.

  6. #6

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    Summer you mostly get quick thunderstorms. Here and gone in a half hour or so. That rain can be heavy and cold, so you really need to shelter yourself from it. This is the type of storm which ponchos are practical for. The umbrella would do the trick as well. So long as your also sheltered from the wind. Ponchos and umbrellas don't do well in wind.

    The closest I've come to hypothermia was waiting out a near-by lightning storm on a humid, 95 degree day. All I had for a jacket was a non-waterproof nylon wind shell. It was useless in the rain and this rain was pretty close to being hail. Once my teeth started chattering, there was no other option but to get moving to warm back up.
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  7. #7

    Default

    I agree with Dropdeadfred and Caleb but I carried rain jacket my entire thru and added rainpants in cold weather (down south in March and up north in Sept/Oct). I just use an EMS Thunderhead--not the lightest b/c of pit zips but I use the jacket all 4 seasons. the waterproofing liner wears at key spots like back of my neck so I replace it probably every 5 years.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-09-2011
    Location
    Monroe, WA
    Age
    53
    Posts
    189

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    I use the Walmart Frogg Toggs. Cheap, easy to replace, light weight, and actually plenty breathable. They fit like a garbage bag but that isn't all bad. I actually find them fairly usable for cold and wet situations. The internal fabric feels better against my arms than does my expensive jackets. The downside, they will tear if you look at them wrong and you won't win any awards for spending the most on your hiking attire. Gear snobs will scoff at you. That may be a bonus depending on your perspective.

  9. #9
    Registered User Maineiac64's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-09-2016
    Location
    Woodstock, GA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    620

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    The arcteryx beta ar jacket and zeta rain pants are good options, pretty light, you want protection from cold rain, especially up high even in summer. Zpacks makes some ultralight options as well.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-17-2009
    Location
    Hadley Pa.
    Age
    64
    Posts
    421

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    The Packa is something I loved since my first long distance hike years ago. A combo of poncho, jacket with pit zips with a connected pack cover sewn on. It's a big loose airy thing but shines in any prolonged rain. For just a plain silnylon jacket at 5 ish ounces then I'd say an Anti Gravity rain jacket. Either the Packa or the AGG rain jacket paired with a rain kilt are solid rain protection.

  11. #11
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO
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    63
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    My favorite rain jacket is a homemade silnylon anorak, under 3 oz and packs the size of a fist. A hiking friend made it and I've used it heavily for over ten years, including an AT thru hike and a cross-USA bike tour. If something like that is commercially available, I'd buy it. It's basically a durable, tailored plastic bag, but it works perfectly for what I use it for. Its light weight and size makes it stupid not to pack it all the time. The matching pants aren't packed as often but they've come in handy on very cold wet days in the shoulder seasons.

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