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  1. #1

    Default Best Compact Lightweight Gas Stove for a Budget Price - BRS 3000T Test and Review

    Watch the full video here:

    In this video we are willing to share with you the review of our new gas stove BRS that we ordered not so long ago from Aliexpress store. We were searching for some lightweight options and stumbled across this one. We have tested it enough already using it the whole summer season as we bought it just before setting off on a long distance hike. And we can say we were completely blown away by its great performance and all the characteristics it has.


    What gas stove do you like to use?

  2. #2

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    Nowadays (cold weather) it's the MSR Reactor. It's quiet and boils faaaast :-) Not too budget though ;-)

    I'm always good for some modifications though :-)




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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by zelph View Post
    Nowadays (cold weather) it's the MSR Reactor. It's quiet and boils faaaast :-) Not too budget though ;-)

    I'm always good for some modifications though :-)



    That stove looks different, thanks for sharing your system. We are not very experienced winter campers so it is good to know

  5. #5
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    For a $15'ish stove, the BRS is a great, ultra-light little tool. It doesn't perform well in wind relative to many other canister options. It has a reputation of the pot supports collapsing on some users when from the weight of more than a liter or so of water is heated using maximum flame intensity. It also has a very small flame diameter leading to burning food if one is trying to cook on the stove, and the flame isn't stable at the lowest settings so it doesn't simmer well at all.

    That being said, yeah, if all you're doing is boiling small volumes of water and you have the ability to shield the stove well in windy conditions, it 's about a light and cheap as you can get for a canister stove.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Walking Nature World View Post
    That stove looks different, thanks for sharing your system. We are not very experienced winter campers so it is good to know
    Just a tip. In really cold weather, tuck your cannister inside your coat (or sleeping bag) for at least 1/2 an hour or so before using it. This will warm the fuel and help vaporize the isobutane mix better so you're not just burning off the propane portion of the fuel in the cannister. A good windscreen is also a necessity, as is a pot lid, to reduce heat loss. In cold weather, which I very infrequently do anymore, I'll use my Jetboil.
    I was self employed once, but it proved too stressful. My boss was a jerk and my employee was a slacker - I didn't know whether to quit or fire myself.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Just a tip. In really cold weather, tuck your cannister inside your coat (or sleeping bag) for at least 1/2 an hour or so before using it. This will warm the fuel and help vaporize the isobutane mix better so you're not just burning off the propane portion of the fuel in the cannister. A good windscreen is also a necessity, as is a pot lid, to reduce heat loss. In cold weather, which I very infrequently do anymore, I'll use my Jetboil.
    Thanks a lot for the tips, much appreciated as we don't have a lot of experience camping in cold conditions.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    For a $15'ish stove, the BRS is a great, ultra-light little tool. It doesn't perform well in wind relative to many other canister options. It has a reputation of the pot supports collapsing on some users when from the weight of more than a liter or so of water is heated using maximum flame intensity. It also has a very small flame diameter leading to burning food if one is trying to cook on the stove, and the flame isn't stable at the lowest settings so it doesn't simmer well at all.

    That being said, yeah, if all you're doing is boiling small volumes of water and you have the ability to shield the stove well in windy conditions, it 's about a light and cheap as you can get for a canister stove.
    We did find the BRS stove covers most of our cooking needs so far hiking in the summer and protecting it from wind. Also had no issues with it breaking or collapsing. In relation to lower settings we didnīt find any problems and again for what we cook normally it is quite good. Of course we have yet to use it more this summer and we may update the review accordingly.

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    Another reported design flaw is the threads, they are made of aluminum (not Ti as one might assume) and can cross thread easy enough. If you do you don't cook.

  10. #10
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    I got a couple of years out of the BRS stove. It was tiny and light, amazingly so. Worked fine until it didn't. Not sure I'd bother with it again, as with that kind of longevity I now think of it as a nearly disposable stove, i.e., not a durable good.

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