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  1. #1
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    Default Best affordable trekking poles

    Hi,
    I'm looking to SOBO this year on the AT. I'm looking into getting a pair of lightweight (not necessarily UL, just know if they're two heavy I'll get arm fatigue), affordable poles. I want a pair so that in rare instances if needed, I can set up my hammock. I'd prefer not to spend much more than $100. I'd also like it if they were collapsible. Maybe I'm asking for too much haha
    Last edited by sam1000000; 01-07-2021 at 14:07.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by sam1000000 View Post
    Hi,
    I'm looking to SOBO this year on the AT. I'm looking into getting a pair of lightweight (not necessarily UL, just know if they're two heavy I'll get arm fatigue), affordable poles. I want a pair so that in rare instances if needed, I can set up my hammock. I'd prefer not to spend much more than $100.
    Dont completely understand your post. "I want a pair so that in rare instances if needed, I can set up my hammock."
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  3. #3
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    You can in a pinch use two poles as stakes and hang your hammock from them. It's not ideal and your butt is still on the ground a little, but better than nothing. I don't think I'll ever have to, but better prepared than not

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    Dont completely understand your post. "I want a pair so that in rare instances if needed, I can set up my hammock."
    i believe he means to ground camp his hammock for cases where there are no trees to hang the hammock from.


    to answer the question look these guys over great poles for the price...

    https://cascademountaintech.com/coll...trekking-poles

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by sam1000000 View Post
    You can in a pinch use two poles as stakes and hang your hammock from them. It's not ideal and your butt is still on the ground a little, but better than nothing. I don't think I'll ever have to, but better prepared than not
    I am not a hammock guy but IMO this is not realistic nor would i try it.
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
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    i believe he means to ground camp his hammock for cases where there are no trees to hang the hammock from.



    careful there------believe OP is a "she"...

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    I am not a hammock guy but IMO this is not realistic nor would i try it.


    likewise, no hammock....

    and likewise, i don't see how sticking a thin pole into the ground a couple of inches is going
    to support a person who weighs between 60 pounds and 200 pounds........

    at most, and this still wouldn't work i believe, one would have to have guy lines staked out to give it some
    support.....

    i wouldnt even waste the time trying this knowing that the end result will be sleeping on the ground...

  8. #8
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    Check out the Fizan poles on Drop. Probably the lightest aluminum poles on the market. Their unique locking mechanism is simple, reliable, and easy to many brain. The mechanical nism is entirety inside the pole so the outside surface is completely smooth.

  9. #9
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    Back in the Dark Ages, I scored a pair of Komperdell telescoping poles from Sierra Trading Post.
    More recently I scored a pair of Komperdell Carbon Folding poles from Moosejaw. Both products have served me well. At reasonable prices.
    Done correctly, a pair of trekking poles should support a human in a hammock. Correctly being the operative word. It helps if you have sailing or heavy lift rigging experience.
    Too bad Sierra Trading Post is no longer the same company.
    Cheers!
    Wayne

  10. #10

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    https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/106769/

    HANGING A HAMMOCK WITH ADJUSTABLE TREKKING POLES.


    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

  11. #11

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    Well, the above looks like a lot of trouble and prone to tip over if not guyed real good. I could see using poles to hold up the ends of the hammock to get the bug net and tarp off your face, but you'd be on the ground. Not much different then supporting just a tarp. Still, it would sort of be a pain to set up, but if there ever was a situation where you need to, you could.

    Don't cheapen out too much on poles or you'll end up buying two sets before the end. Get a quality pole like Black Diamond or Leki. Their low end poles are a little on the heavy side, but that also makes them sturdier.
    Follow slogoen on Instagram.

  12. #12

    Default Best affordable trekking poles

    This is exactly why I am no longer a hammocker. I tried hammocking for three years and always spent too much time finding trees to hang from. Too big in diameter, too small, too far apart, too close together, too dense, no trees at all. I found this to be true especially on the northern half of the Long Trail where the trees are really dense.

    Im sure there are those who will say theyve never had a problem. Good for them.

    Ive seen this method of hanging discussed over on hammock forums, and is just not realistic.

    Ill stick to my tent.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Last edited by Deacon; 01-08-2021 at 08:19.

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    Well, the above looks like a lot of trouble and prone to tip over if not guyed real good.



    and if one thinks it's a lot of trouble now------think about it after a long day of hiking..........

  14. #14

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    Well I don't know anything about hammocking, but I swear by the cheap amazon poles that are less than $30. I have bought 4 pair. Use them for hiking. snow shoeing and X-country skiing. I destroyed a pair on my first PCT section hike walking thru the lava fields of Oregon. They are durable, reasonably light and cheap. Can't imagine spending more on treking poles.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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    This is one of the handful of videos I had seen on the setup https://youtu.be/GOoKpAXTyjE

    As I said, probably won't have to, but it would be nice to have the option. I'm pretty sold on hammocking as I have really poor circulation and end up waking up every hour when tenting because somethings gone numb. When I've hammocked, I haven't had this issue. I also kinda just want to have a pair instead of a staff \_(ツ)_/

    I checked out the cascade mountain tech ones and they seem like a really good option!

  16. #16

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    I think the disconnect here is that everyone is considering that the poles will be used to support bodyweight if you look at all of the videos- not the case. Just using the poles for the fly and hammock as a bug net. But that one guy i posted above is indeed using his fancy contraption to bear his weight load. I love my tent.
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
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    Just using the poles for the fly and hammock as a bug net.


    do you mean then sleeping on ground under this?

    i read it as OP wanted to use poles to support the weight-----" if needed, I can set up my hammock".......


    that's where my line of thought resides....

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by TNhiker View Post
    do you mean then sleeping on ground under this?

    i read it as OP wanted to use poles to support the weight-----" if needed, I can set up my hammock".......


    that's where my line of thought resides....
    Yep, the OP's video link shows ground setup with hammock as a bivy. In that case any kind of trekking pole or found stick will work.

    The issue isn't really the poles (unless there are literally no found sticks to be had) but carrying an air mat or CCF pad for the ground.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  19. #19

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    Given the photos, the complexity of this looks time consuming to set up and prone to failure with little margin of error if just one of the guy line is improperly set up. I cannot imagine setting this up in 25 mph winds or driving rain. However, adventures are made from such things as expertise grows.

    I would not go cheap on poles and get a set of Black Diamond aluminum poles, flick locks, and composite material grips. You should be able to find a decent set for around $100 from REI or other vendors. Given the lateral load on the poles with this set up, carbon poles should be avoided, they would break if the guys were not exactly right. Aluminum would be more forgiving.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by TNhiker View Post
    do you mean then sleeping on ground under this?

    i read it as OP wanted to use poles to support the weight-----" if needed, I can set up my hammock".......


    that's where my line of thought resides....
    Yes sleeping on the ground. And maybe the OP did mean suspended off ground but that is just not realistic. Out of all of the Appalachian Trail I cant think of anywhere within reason that you could not find 2 trees to hang a hammock from even in a pinch.

    -The roan highlands - Trees in between the balds and only a 10 mile stretch-Grayson - Trees. -Chestnut mountain, VA - Walk another .2 either direction and you have trees-Nebo road, VA- Private land anyways
    -Osborne Farm, TN - Walk another .4 either way-The whites? Probably more hammock opportunity then tenting through there



    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    I would not go cheap on poles and get a set of Black Diamond aluminum poles, flick locks, and composite material grips. You should be able to find a decent set for around $100 from REI or other vendors. Given the lateral load on the poles with this set up, carbon poles should be avoided, they would break if the guys were not exactly right. Aluminum would be more forgiving.
    I agree, I would not go cheap on poles - you are either using them everyday and need them to be durable, or your carrying them on your pack to only use for shelter setup and want them to be light.



    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Back in the Dark Ages, I scored a pair of Komperdell telescoping poles from Sierra Trading Post.
    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    More recently I scored a pair of Komperdell Carbon Folding poles from Moosejaw. Both products have served me well. At reasonable prices.
    Done correctly, a pair of trekking poles should support a human in a hammock. Correctly being the operative word. It helps if you have sailing or heavy lift rigging experience.
    Too bad Sierra Trading Post is no longer the same company.
    Cheers!
    Wayne
    I have used Komperdell's for the entirety of my hiking over the past 10 years and AT completion - Customer service is top notch and they make a good product
    Last edited by Gambit McCrae; 01-08-2021 at 10:17.
    Trail Miles: 4,007.6 - AT Trips: 70
    AT Map 1: 2004.8
    AT Map 2: 265.0
    Sheltowee Trace Map: 84.0
    BMT Map: 57.7
    Pinhoti Trail Map: 0.0

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