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  1. #1
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    Default Snow incoming - Citico

    Looks like The Bob should be nice and white tomorrow. Anyone heading up? I am tempted to head that way from AL, but my normal crew is all tied up. Too much Boy Scout in me to hike it alone.
    Last edited by clusterone; 11-30-2020 at 01:54.

  2. #2

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    I just got back from an 18 day trip and got hit by that Nov 30---Dec 3-4 blizzard and it hit me on Slickrock Creek with cold temps around 10F or 12F and deep (and deepening) snow from 6 inches up to 16 inch drifts on Fodderstack Ridge. Had some hard trudging days. I'll post a full report here soon.


  3. #3

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    I started one hiking day overdressed due to the cold and looked like this---

    Trip 208 (226)-XL.jpg

    After 30 minutes I looked like this---

    Trip 208 (228)-XL.jpg

  4. #4
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    Great one, Walter!

    I had done a two days trip in the same timeframe here in the Alps, and while it had been freezing cold and foggy down in the valley, I was sweating in T-shirt up on the mountains in the midday sun.
    Inversion weather is what we call this.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    Great one, Walter!

    I had done a two days trip in the same timeframe here in the Alps, and while it had been freezing cold and foggy down in the valley, I was sweating in T-shirt up on the mountains in the midday sun.
    Inversion weather is what we call this.
    You're so right about cold creek valley air---it's hard to not feel the difference when descending into these 100% humidity cold valleys.

    What's really odd is not having the same experience in the summer during furnace temps---as then the creek valleys don't seem all that much cooler.

  6. #6
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    weather inversions happen all the time in the southeast mountains........


    when i worked at the tv station----before i left for a trip, i would ask one of the meteorologists what the weather would be like...

    often times, they would tell me there would be an inversion......

    and the ridgelines would be much cooler than the valleys....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNhiker View Post
    weather inversions happen all the time in the southeast mountains........


    when i worked at the tv station----before i left for a trip, i would ask one of the meteorologists what the weather would be like...

    often times, they would tell me there would be an inversion......

    and the ridgelines would be much cooler than the valleys....
    Just wondering, why would be the ridgelines cooler when inversion takes place?
    Up to my understanding inversion happens when lack of wind lets the air do what it likes to do due to physical properties: Warm air is lighther than cold air, so air warmed by the sun gets lifted above the cold air. Lack of wind allows for the forming of layers.

    Here at the northern rim of the Alps, this is what the weather is most of late autumn to winter:
    Bright sunshine (including inversion) inside the alps, thick layer of fog out in the plains.
    After sundown, the fog slowly creeps inside the valleys - looks scary sometimes.

    People living out in the plains have a hard time being stuck in the fog for weeks on end. Weekends people are cueing up to get a glimpse of sunlight somewhere in the mountains.
    We call them "fog-refugees".
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo L. View Post
    Just wondering, why would be the ridgelines cooler when inversion takes place?
    Up to my understanding inversion happens when lack of wind lets the air do what it likes to do due to physical properties: Warm air is lighther than cold air, so air warmed by the sun gets lifted above the cold air. Lack of wind allows for the forming of layers.

    Here at the northern rim of the Alps, this is what the weather is most of late autumn to winter:
    Bright sunshine (including inversion) inside the alps, thick layer of fog out in the plains.
    After sundown, the fog slowly creeps inside the valleys - looks scary sometimes.

    People living out in the plains have a hard time being stuck in the fog for weeks on end. Weekends people are cueing up to get a glimpse of sunlight somewhere in the mountains.
    We call them "fog-refugees".
    Common occurrence in the TN mountains---


  9. #9
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    Up to my understanding inversion happens when lack of wind lets the air do what it likes to do due to physical properties: Warm air is lighther than cold air, so air warmed by the sun gets lifted above the cold air. Lack of wind allows for the forming of layers.


    sorry....you're right....

    was thinking backwards......


    these days of being up for 21 hours many days in the row doing paperwork have me seeing double sometimes....

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