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  1. #1

    Default Man charged in Appalachian Trail murder found competent to stand trial - Southwest Vi


  2. #2

    Default Man accused of Appalachian Trail murder pleads not guilty by reason of insanity - WDB


  3. #3

    Default Prosecutors allow accused Appalachian Trail killer to plead not guilty by reason of i


  4. #4

    Default Hiker charged in deadly Appalachian Trail attack deemed insane - WBIR.com


  5. #5

    Default Man pleads not guilty by reason of insanity in Appalachian Trail hiker death - OutThe


  6. #6

    Default Prosecutors allow accused App Trail killer to plead not guilty by reason of insanity


  7. #7

    Default Man accused of Appalachian Trail murder pleads not guilty by reason of insanity - WHS


  8. #8

    Default Hiker who killed one, wounded another on Appalachian Trail deemed insane, to be commi


  9. #9

  10. #10

  11. #11

    Default Man accused of stabbing Appalachian Trail hiker to death pleads not guilty by reason


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  13. #13

    Default

    Thank you for posting this update. Insanity defense is probably the only option available, and seems to have significant merit if public reports of the deep psychiatric illness are accurate. Makes one wonder how the police force that had Jordan in custody before the murder can justify letting him go.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrum View Post
    Thank you for posting this update. Insanity defense is probably the only option available, and seems to have significant merit if public reports of the deep psychiatric illness are accurate. Makes one wonder how the police force that had Jordan in custody before the murder can justify letting him go.
    Because we don't arrest people for "pre crimes." And our society has no desire to actually help the mentally ill.
    ALSO:

    Jordan, 30, had another run-in with law enforcement along the AT in April, when sheriff’s deputies in Unicoi County, Tennessee, arrested him after he reportedly threatened hikers with a large knife. Officials declined to prosecute Jordan for assault after the alleged victims decided not to press charges. Jordan ultimately pled guilty to the possession of a schedule VI drug and drug paraphernalia, public intoxication and criminal impersonation. A court sentenced him to probation, and he was released after paying a fine.

    https://www.backpacker.com/news-and-events/appalachian-trail-attack/
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  15. #15
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Half View Post
    Officials declined to prosecute Jordan for assault after the alleged victims decided not to press charges.
    Perhaps those alleged victimsí decision not to press charges was driven by the near universal (but false) belief that murder is so uncommon on the AT, their failing to press charges would not present any grave risk to others.

    To the ATCís credit, they were less quick to brush aside this latest tragedy as something like a 1 in 8 million anomaly that needed to be put in perspective for the public.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrum View Post
    Makes one wonder how the police force that had Jordan in custody before the murder can justify letting him go.
    State laws vary for involuntary commitment to a psychiatric hospital but you will need at least one independent psychiatric evaluation and a judge order. We expect our police force to be also mental health experts but they are not. The judge in that case could have had ordered psych evaluation before letting him go but in those little rural towns it is not that easy, it is my guess. And as there was no charges there was no reason to keep him locked.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickb View Post
    Perhaps those alleged victims’ decision not to press charges was driven by the near universal (but false) belief that murder is so uncommon on the AT, their failing to press charges would not present any grave risk to others.
    So if I am reading this correctly, your assertion is that murder on the AT is not uncommon? Seems a bit of a stretch.

  18. #18

    Default Man pleads not guilty by reason of insanity in killing of hiker on Appalachian Trail


  19. #19
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
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    H
    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    So if I am reading this correctly, your assertion is that murder on the AT is not uncommon? Seems a bit of a stretch.
    It is uncommon ó rare even.

    But not so very rare that we can ignore it when making our choices.

    Like whether or not the major inconvenience of pressing assault charges really matters.

  20. #20

    Default Cape Cod man pleads not guilty by reason of insanity in Appalachian Trail hikerís dea


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