Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Registered User somers515's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-02-2014
    Location
    Millstone Township, NJ
    Age
    47
    Posts
    315

    Default A good light weight freestanding 1 person tent?

    I'm considering a purchase of a freestanding tent (ie one that can with no hassle be set up on a tent platform or on rock slab) . .

    I also prefer it to be relatively light weight.

    The Big Agnes Copper Spur appears to fit the bill.

    Any opinions on the Copper Spur or other freestanding tents I should consider?

    I was intrigued by the REI Quarter Dome but although its considered "free standing", it appears as if it needs at least one staked corner . . no?

    Same with the Tarptent Moment DW . . also appears to need to be staked out.

    Thanks in advance whiteblaze!
    LT End-to-Ender 2017; AT from Lehigh Gap to Hudson River; NH 31/48
    "Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in a while, or the light won't come in." - Isaac Asimov

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-08-2012
    Location
    Taghkanic, New York, United States
    Posts
    3,032
    Journal Entries
    11

    Default

    Just a note from maybe 5 years back. Big Agnus advertised tent packing weight was usually a good deal lower than what it actually was. IDK if they corrected this, I'd check reviews and the like to find out actual pack weight.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    590

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by somers515 View Post
    I'm considering a purchase of a freestanding tent (ie one that can with no hassle be set up on a tent platform or on rock slab) . .

    I also prefer it to be relatively light weight.

    The Big Agnes Copper Spur appears to fit the bill.

    Any opinions on the Copper Spur or other freestanding tents I should consider?

    I was intrigued by the REI Quarter Dome but although its considered "free standing", it appears as if it needs at least one staked corner . . no?

    Same with the Tarptent Moment DW . . also appears to need to be staked out.

    Thanks in advance whiteblaze!
    Correct about the quarter dome it's been a great tent but yes does require a couple of stakes and rather confined. I think the big agnes copper spur is a much better shelter, as weight to size ratio. It most certainly will be my next tent.

  4. #4
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
    Join Date
    12-13-2004
    Location
    Essex, Vermont
    Age
    64
    Posts
    2,331

    Default

    If you're a trekking pole user, the TarpTent Rainbow works with trekking poles. I usually stake mine out on the ground, but if I have to use platforms, it works just fine. Super nice 1 person tent, under 2 1/2 pounds.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by somers515 View Post
    I'm considering a purchase of a freestanding tent (ie one that can with no hassle be set up on a tent platform or on rock slab) . .

    I also prefer it to be relatively light weight.

    The Big Agnes Copper Spur appears to fit the bill.

    Any opinions on the Copper Spur or other freestanding tents I should consider?

    I was intrigued by the REI Quarter Dome but although its considered "free standing", it appears as if it needs at least one staked corner . . no?

    Same with the Tarptent Moment DW . . also appears to need to be staked out.

    Thanks in advance whiteblaze!
    Whatever tent you get it's a good idea to stake it down.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  6. #6

    Default

    Might want to look at the Hubba NX before you make up your mind. I don't own one, but have an original Hubba I used for many years. Bit of a coffin, very narrow, but you can sit up if you aren't too tall. Very stable without stakes, on the ground, platform or in a shelter as a bug house. Wind pushed it into the ground rather than lifting it. The new version is just lighter and a lot more expensive, but should work about the same.
    “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait until that other is ready...”~Henry David Thoreau

    http://lesstraveledby.net
    YouTube Channel
    Trailspace Reviews

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2006
    Location
    Melbourne,Australia
    Age
    64
    Posts
    2,777

    Default

    One of the problems with "freestanding", I think, has to do with the term " tent " as used in the US compared to the rest of the world. In the US tent is the name for the inner, so if the inner does stand up by itself then the "tent" becomes freestanding. As it is the case with the BA tents, by the time you put the fly on, you need to stake that out. The Copper Spur (solo version) needs 3 stakes to work so that the vestibule stays in place and the fly at the two ends does not touch the inner . The two end stake also help to give the tent longiudinal tension , good on a windy day (however it will work better using the extra guylines provided) .

  8. #8

    Default

    I love my Copper Spur--roomy, easy to set up, sturdy.

  9. #9

    Default

    I have a BA Fly Creek 1 and have used it several times freestanding on the AT on on tent platforms, on the rock slab behind Fingerboard Shelter in NY, and even Moxie Bald Mountain in ME.

    Now when I can stake it down I always do. But multiple nights free standing so far without a problem.

    The Fly Creek is also lighter.
    The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
    Richard Ewell, CSA General


  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    590

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Astro View Post
    I have a BA Fly Creek 1 and have used it several times freestanding on the AT on on tent platforms, on the rock slab behind Fingerboard Shelter in NY, and even Moxie Bald Mountain in ME.

    Now when I can stake it down I always do. But multiple nights free standing so far without a problem.

    The Fly Creek is also lighter.
    Just my 2c- because I ain't got nothing else to do , the fly creek looks very coffin like no offense astro . For just a few ounces more there's 2 side doors, 2 vestibules which in bad weather you can use 1 for bathroom and 1 for egress and cooking . The copper spur also offers room for gear, pet,friend , plenty of room for a party in case you get held up for a couple days. ( ok,ok more than just a couple of ounces). Ya know it's kind of like socks and underwear very subjective.

  11. #11
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    53
    Posts
    4,400
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    I loved my Copper Spur UL2 as a very roomy 1 person tent (I use a Large sleeping pad, and the UL2 is way too small to be considered a two man tent if either uses a large pad).
    I usually find that staking out the rain fly is good enough to keep the tent in place.

  12. #12

    Default

    I've enjoyed a Copper Spur UL2 for a while now. When I was shopping for a tent I looked at several single person tents and found most singles did not have a lot of room inside for gear storage and when sitting up I found it difficult not to rub a shoulder on the inside walls of the tent where condensations can reside. Most of these are single entry which I have never liked, so as a result they did not pass the "what if weather pins me down for a day or two" habitat test.

    I then looked at "2-person" tents, which for me would be too small for 2-people but seemed more practical for what I felt were important qualities I needed in a tent. I looked at a lot of 2-person tents to see how close they were to the features I felt necessary which were, in order of importance to me: interior space, exterior space (vestibules and fly coverage), entry access, ease of set up, weight, cost, color.

    Looking at a number of tents, I found the UL2 provides the room inside to store gear and sit up without contacting tent walls, two entry access doors on both sides of the tent allowed the tent to "air out" very nicely and provided a significant amount of sheltered space when vestibules are set up, dual wall construction controls condensation well and materials are is easy to care for. The published weight specifications are very close to actual weight, though slightly heavier than a single person tent, the weight difference was so minor as compared to a single person tent and the larger tent provided all the features I wanted that the extra few ounces were negligible. As with other gear that needs a little technique to use, the tent sets up quickly once the set up process has been learned even with limited or no light and in heavy weather.

    Like HooKooDooKu, I stake down the free standing tent even if there is no heavy weather just as a precaution, I have not been through conditions where wind might start the tent to sail with me in it, however early on I realized the weight of my pack in the tent would not be enough to stay in place on open ground with heavy wind gusts that precede rain squalls or weather front passage.

    Overall I would recommend this tent. If purchase price is an issue, if one is patient there are used UL2's that come up for sale here on the forum (as well as other sites), some barely used, others used for a full thru hike that will save some money.

    Good luck!

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    590

    Default

    Traveler or hookoodooku,, like I said this will be my next big purchase. My question if you were to buy again would you go with the copper spur or tiger wall ? And why?

  14. #14

    Default

    So thisi s Copper Spur 2? I have the CP1--1 door. I am not coordinated enough for the Fly Creek or any other tent where you enter at your head/pillow. I need to have the side entry tent. As part of my transition to lighter weight I recently purchased the Tarptent Notch LI and I do enjoy the 2 vestibules/doors. Learning curve to set up properly. Happy to have both.

  15. #15
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,256
    Images
    3

    Default

    Maybe already said.... check out the BA Tiger Wall UL2. Significantly lighter than the Copper Spur, but has essentially the same room inside. I own both, an older copper Spur, which we loved, but wanted to shave some weight and recently bought the Tiger Wall for my PCT attempt (which I left after a week for obvious reasons). I did only use it a week, but was thoroughly satisfied with its performance, including some epic rains and strong winds.

    The Tiger Wall is technically not entirely "free standing", as the foot of the tent does need two stakes to keep the sides separated. Since any tent needs to be staked down a bit anyway, this is zero issue for me.

    For the record, I used a BA Fly Creek for many years, including half of an AT, and really didn't have any issues with the front entry, but sure, I do like the side entry better.

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-23-2019
    Location
    Harpers ferry wv.
    Age
    56
    Posts
    590

    Default

    I know OP is looking for 1 person tent and I to go solo but it sure is nice to have a little room. That tiger wall sure looks nice and "significantly lighter " , win,win.

  17. #17
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Age
    63
    Posts
    4,256
    Images
    3

    Default

    For the record, the Tiger Wall UL2 with a dyneema stuff sack (zpacks) and all attached original cordage is exactly 35 oz, or 2lb, 3 oz. IIRC, my Copper spur is over 3 lbs, so probably about 1 lb savings.

    These weights do NOT include those heavy stakes they ship with their products, which I believe are about 3.5 oz for the Tiger Wall. I use Ti shepard hooks, which come in at 1.5 ounces for 8.

    And yeah, I like the extra room of the 2-man, but there is a TW1 as well, 5 ounces lighter.

  18. #18
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    53
    Posts
    4,400
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    The Tiger Wall is not totally free standing... like the REI Quarter Dome.
    Both try to save weight by only using one center support pole towards the feet rather than a pair of support poles to the corners.
    As a result, you've got to stake out the tent beyond JUST the rainfly to get the corners stretched out.

    But if I were in the market for another tent right now, I would have to seriously consider the REI Flash Air 2 tent.
    It appears to be REI's attempt to make something similar to the tried and true ZPacks Duplex
    Like the ZPacks, it's not free-standing, but it's only about 25% heavier than ZPacks, but about a third the price (on sale right now for $225)

  19. #19

    Default

    I carried the REI Quarter Dome in ‘19 on my Flip Flop and it was great. You only need two stakes if you choose to set up the vestibule on the fly or want extra security in wind, Otherwise it is freestanding. If fits nicely in most shelters for extra protection against wind and mice. Not something you’d do if the shelter is packed but if you’re alone it works out well.

  20. #20
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    74
    Posts
    8,317

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Whatever tent you get it's a good idea to stake it down.
    Aye!
    Any unstaked freestanding tent is a beach ball waiting to roll away.
    Been there. Done that. Watched the tent fly away.
    Wayne
    Last edited by Venchka; Today at 08:23.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •