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Thread: Lunches

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Pita or tortilla or other flat bread or crackers with: a can of tuna in olive oil (good fat calories here), can or pouch of chicken, summer sausage, can of deviled ham. Empty tuna size cans surprisingly weigh about the same as the empty pouches, contain more food, are easier to eat out of if going that route, and cost less than pouches as well. The only extra weight needed is a little P-38 can opener https://www.google.com/search?q=army...hrome&ie=UTF-8 which weighs all of 4 grams.
    What don't tell me you never saw that survivor guy open a can on a rock ? And your a whiteblaze member jeeeez!!

  2. #22
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    Triscuits. Cheese (not too salty). Dried fruit. Mmmmm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traffic Jam View Post
    yep...corn chips are the best (and I also really dislike bars). My stomach is finicky when hiking and I often have little appetite but Fritos always taste delicious.
    And they make good fire starters, dual purpose.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JNI64 View Post
    What don't tell me you never saw that survivor guy open a can on a rock ? And your a whiteblaze member jeeeez!!
    Er, um, hmm - so okay then - doing that might scratch and damage the natural rocks and even spill food juices/particles on the soil. Definitely not in keeping with LNT principles. Yes, that's it. Can't do such things as a WB member you understand!

  5. #25
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    What tastes good to me changes on the trail. My favorite trail lunch is raisin bread with peanut butter. The raisins help keep the bread from molding. I have never eaten that anywhere but on the trail because hiking is the only time it appeals to me. I wouldn't find a hot lunch appealing unless the weather was cold. I also like Fritos and bean dip, cheese and a satsuma, or trail mix. I remember reading of a hiker who always ate marshmallows and peanut butter for lunch. That sounds pretty good. You will figure out what suits you.

  6. #26
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    I've stopped thinking of meals when I hike. Instead, I stop for a decent break every two hours, long enough to eat as much as I can. That's usually at least five times a day, and I ran out of names for those food breaks.

    I keep a bag of tortillas, a jar of peanut butter, a couple bags of different kinds of nuts and dried fruit, a bag of crackers, some Fig Newtons, some fresh fruit and veg for a couple of days at least, and a large bag of muesli.

  7. #27
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    I used to just keep hiking and eat on the move but am trying to make myself stop every 2-3 miles to take the pack off, stretch, drink, and eat a snack. Lunch, if I eat one, is usually a Spam sandwich, sometimes with cheese, and Hellman's mayo (which comes in individual servings). Otherwise I eat trail mix (with espresso beans and chocolate, if I can find it at Walgreen's), Gatorade energy chews, and Think bars (which don't get as hard in the winter as other bars).

  8. #28

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    I've hiked with people who can boil water and eat a bag of Ramen noodles out of its own bag in the time I can get out some crackers,cheese,and a candy bar.Don't ask me how he does it without burning himself with the hot water.
    I survive on FB cooking but I have a cozy for the bag.I've seen others eat oatmeal straight out of its own bag at breakfast too.That .4 oz a ziplock FB weighs is just too much weight I guess and it does add up.Ditto for the stuff sacks.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by john844 View Post
    You might find that taking a lunch break is refreshing and a good time to remove your shoes and socks to give your feet time to fully dry out.
    One of the first things I learned from Colin Fletcher (The Hikers Bible) - take your boots and socks off when taking a break. I follow this pretty routinely and find it a refreshing habit unless weather or circumstance prevents it.

  10. #30
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    I'm another PB&J on a tortilla kind of guy. I use the bars for snack breaks (when I do keep moving, or at least keep my pack on). For me, lunch is for stopping, getting your pack off, giving your feet a rest, digging through your food bag, and getting something more than a bar. Planters use to make a great nut-based bar but they discontinued that years ago (crap). I'm not obsessed with protein in particular. Protein probably isn't the most efficient way to get energy.

  11. #31

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    Lance Snacks makes a very similar product to the Planters Peanut Bar. Amazon sells them by the case. I usually just buy the snack size paydays which are probably more sugar and less peanuts for hiking. I think the paydays are bit softer in cold weather.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    One of the first things I learned from Colin Fletcher (The Hikers Bible) - take your boots and socks off when taking a break. I follow this pretty routinely and find it a refreshing habit unless weather or circumstance prevents it.
    Just a minor point, but what's commonly called The Hikers Bible was actually titled "The Complete Walker". Great book, way ahead of its time, although I still find the practice of cutting off toothbrush handles to save a few grams a bit too extreme. Makes them much harder to use and brush effectively.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4eyedbuzzard View Post
    Just a minor point, but what's commonly called The Hikers Bible was actually titled "The Complete Walker". Great book, way ahead of its time, although I still find the practice of cutting off toothbrush handles to save a few grams a bit too extreme. Makes them much harder to use and brush effectively.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    It must be remembered that Colin Fletcher carried a 55-65 lb pack---See his gear list---and 6 lbs of just camera equipment---

    Colin Fletcher kit.jpg

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    It must be remembered that Colin Fletcher carried a 55-65 lb pack---See his gear list---and 6 lbs of just camera equipment---
    Yep, and then he'd obsess about weight and cut the strings off his tea bags! Still a classic, though, and what my Dad (and therefore me)used to learn from.

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by garlic08 View Post
    I've stopped thinking of meals when I hike. Instead, I stop for a decent break every two hours, long enough to eat as much as I can. That's usually at least five times a day, and I ran out of names for those food breaks.

    I keep a bag of tortillas, a jar of peanut butter, a couple bags of different kinds of nuts and dried fruit, a bag of crackers, some Fig Newtons, some fresh fruit and veg for a couple of days at least, and a large bag of muesli.
    Ahh ó a master speaks!

    Iíve more or less adopted that strategy as well. DIY gorp, salami, cheese, one bar a day, eaten whenever I feel like it, and especially 20 minutes beforehand in anticipation of a tough climb up or down.

    Now I have to work on consuming enough calories during the night. Extra before-bed, and extra after the obligatory nighttime pee-break(s) Ö mostly the same gorp mixture, heavy on nuts.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Nanatuk View Post
    Protein bars are usually Oatmeal based (Clif Bars and similar) or Date based (Lara Bars and similar). I bought a bunch of different kind of bars to taste test before my hike last year and ended up packing Kind bars, Lara bars, Probars and RX bars in my resupply boxes.

    I loved the Probar - Superfood slam and the RX bars. Very filling and good energy,
    I ended up loathing the Lara bars - Something about the texture. I ended up smearing peanut butter to make them palatable.
    I love the Kind bars, but not very filling as a meal, more of a snack.

    Everyone's taste is different so go give them a try before you go.

    My usual trail lunch is a tortilla with either Peanut butter and dried fruit or salami and cheese (baby bels).

    I used to think I liked dates until I brought back a bunch of protein-bar based snacks from a business meeting afternoon break room kind of thing. The leftovers were about to be tossed (or hopefully donated) and I was encouraged to take all I wanted. As a hiker, I was only too happy to snap up one of each kind, no pun intended.

    To my palate, they ranged from meh to horrible, and the horrible ones all had in common that dates were one of the top ingredients. I recall liking to eat them "loose", as much as raisins or other dried fruits when I had them just on their own. After having these bars, loose is probably the only way I'd eat them again! Unlike you, Nanatuk, it wasn't the texture for me (and I do get that on some foods), it really was the taste. Blah!

  17. #37

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    Dates get a bad rep from many as the only ones they have had are the low quality processed ones, typically dusted with sugar to make them palatable. Even the ones in bulk bins in stores can be marginal quality. The jumbo Medjool dates are close to candy. The downside is good dates seem to always come with pits and that means having to haul the pits out. Dates have a low glycemic index so they are good for a quick energy boost but need to be mixed in with something with longer term energy. I usually buy the domestically produced dates as the imported ones can go through a long chain of not necessarily modern hygiene standards. They keep well, no need to freeze but do keep slowly drying if not kept in a sealed plastic bag.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traillium View Post
    ...whenever I feel like it, and especially 20 minutes beforehand in anticipation of a tough climb up or down....
    I added the bold above and strongly agree--most accidents happen on descents and it's good to stop, rest, and fuel before a tough one.

    It's the final descents into town that worry me most. It's hard to pause when dinner and a cold beer are an hour away.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  19. #39

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    My favorite is pepperoni and a tortilla

  20. #40
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    3 beef sticks, 2 packages of cheese and crackers (various flavors), and 1 or 2 handfuls of corn chips. As I tire of the latter I will replace, for a bit, with a handful or two of Skittles.
    Lonehiker

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