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  1. #1

    Default WTB: 40 degree Quilt

    I am searching for a 40 degree down quilt to help increase the warmth of my Montbell 20 degree down bag. What do you recommend?

  2. #2

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    For what it's worth - by that temperature range the difference in weight between down and synthetic isn't very significant and you get the added moisture handling of synthetic. Just a thought. Makes a good combination IMO. I love down in general but its advantages start to dwindle as the temperature rises.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalebJ View Post
    For what it's worth - by that temperature range the difference in weight between down and synthetic isn't very significant and you get the added moisture handling of synthetic. Just a thought. Makes a good combination IMO. I love down in general but its advantages start to dwindle as the temperature rises.
    I agree with you as a matter of conventional wisdom, but the OP asked about using it to increase the warmth of a 20F down bag, so I suspect that Rowdy is talking pretty darn cold temperatures. So unless the plan is to also use the 40F quilt as a standalone in mild temperatures, I think down is the best choice.

    Unfortunately I can't speak to 40F down quilts; hopefully someone else can. However, I have at times found a 20F down bag inadequate, and a few tweaks can make a big difference:

    - sleeping pad with R value over 5. I use 2 CCF in winter. Makes a HUGE difference.
    - loosely fitting fleece PJs - i.e., 1/4 zip fleece top (200 weight) + fleece PJ pants (the kind you can find at walmart for $10 in camo, pirate, plaid, or chili pepper themes). If your bag is roomy, this helps fill up the gaps with warm stuff.
    - Costco down throw (60x70) on top. If you're in a narrow 1P tent or bivy, double it over (30x70) for even more warmth. It's not much by itself, but it can make a big difference as an add-on.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    I agree with you as a matter of conventional wisdom, but the OP asked about using it to increase the warmth of a 20F down bag, so I suspect that Rowdy is talking pretty darn cold temperatures. So unless the plan is to also use the 40F quilt as a standalone in mild temperatures, I think down is the best choice.
    I did make the assumption that the plan was to use the 40* quilt as such in addition to a supplement for the 20* bag. If it's only ever used to go along with the existing bag, you're right that the humidity aspect is a non issue.

    As you suggested, a bit of lightweight insulated clothing could work well here also, assuming there's room for layering in the existing bag. That has the added benefit of some flexibility when you're not sleeping as well. Rab's Argon down pants are about $150, for example. That plus wearing your midweight layer to bed could help.

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the response guys and gals. I have what I need now. THANKS!!

  6. #6
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    There was an older thread on Backpacking Light about this. https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/58735/
    The conventional rule of thumb follows the formula: [x -(70 y)/2 = z] where X=20 and Y=40: 20-(70-40)/2=5
    Also, a recent article from Enlightened Equipment https://support.enlightenedequipment.com/hc/en-us/articles/115002770588-How-to-layer-quilts-for-sub-zero-camping
    Suggests that the outer layer should be synthetic. My personal experience matches this recommendation. I use a 30 degree down quilt over my 20 when it gets very cold and the humidity as it exits the bag ends up condensing on/in the very cold outer layer. At some point I'll be updating my system to a synthetic outer layer. That being said, adding a light quilt over (nested foot boxes) the main bag/quilt ends up being toasty warm for me.
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