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  1. #1
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    Default Quilt + sleeping bag?

    I have a 20 deg bag and 40 deg quilt. Together, Enlightened Equipment says they should be similar to a 0 deg bag.

    I was trying which way seems to work best when using together and it seems like putting the quilt inside works well. This is probably because I have an extra wide bag. 70 inches at the chest. I just could not handle a 62 inch bag with a 60 in girth at the shoulders.

    So with the quilt inside I don't have to worry about it sliding off as I sleep. And it actually feels some of the extra space around my legs and torso so I think that is better and it does not seem like I am compressing it much.

    Any one else doing this with bag+quilt? and if so which way do you use them together?

  2. #2
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    Default

    I'm not a thru hiker ,section 1,2 weeks at a time. But for me if I go out in them temps I take my o degrees quilt with 4oz extra feathers combined with my 30 degrees sleeping bag synthetic and the quilt goes on top , sleeping on a xtherm good to go well below 0. That's when I really hate getting out to pee..

  3. #3
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    Default

    I’ve only used doubled up quilts but I’d assume the quilt on top would be warmer. Quilt wouldn’t be compressed inside bag....


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  4. #4
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    Default

    I see your logic. But. I would say it may be better to put the quilt on the outside. The more loft you get the warmer it will be. That also means if you can create an airspace, however slight, between the sleeping bag and quilt it will add to your insulation. Inside the bag there has to be some degree of compression. Something to keep in mind if you're trying to eak every bit out of your system for warmth as the difference may be very minimal. If what you're doing is working for you then run with it!
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  5. #5
    Leonidas
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    04-26-2016
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    Default

    I do the double layer of quilts. 50 degree APEX long/wide and 40 degree APEX reg/reg. I have slept down to 15 degrees with this combo with light layers. Just bought a 30 degree down Enigma with draft collar to give me a lower range of comfortable temps in case the temp drops more than expected.
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  6. #6

    Default

    I did the quilt on top, with the foot box closed on the quilt. Worked well for a range of temps, as it was quickly adjustable in the middle of the night.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Thanks for the commentsLast night it was 21deg here so I got little test. hopefully i'll get some single digits before I start in February. I'll give both ways a test again, but from past attempts of the quilt on top it seemed to slide around a lot. Perhaps if I used those straps that came with it would help.

  8. #8

    Default

    yeah, you definitely need to the straps if you want to get proper use out of the quilt on the top. I do it frequently in the winter
    If your bag is roomy and the quilt doesn't get compressed too much, you could definitely experiment with the quilt on the inside (especially if it's not 0f... and you don't need the maximum warmth).
    That wouldn't work with my setup since the bag is too small, so I've never tried it

  9. #9

    Default

    I have a 20 degree bag which I find cold and think I know why. It's designed for someone with a much larger gurth then me. Therefore there is a lot of extra space, space I need to heat. Sounds like you have the same problem.

    Try it both ways. It won't take long to figure out what works best.
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  10. #10

    Default

    The key to any sleep system is that your loft does not get compressed or wet. A quilt inside a sleeping bag would lead to loft compression (from the inside) unless the bag is oversized enough. This is why I like oversized bags and use them exclusively (when I use a bag rather than a quilt). In winter, an option that I like is to use down pants, down booties, and a down jacket inside the oversized bag, which also gives me something nice and warm to wear in camp.
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  11. #11

    Default

    Two years ago I had an overnight at -5*F using a 10* WM bag and a 40* ZPacks quit over the top. NeoAir XTherm and a CCF pad underneath. I was toasty warm all night. I liked the quilt on top for the full loft and it was easier to adjust if needed.

  12. #12
    Registered User JPritch's Avatar
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    I have a 20 WM Alpinlite bag and a 40 EE quilt, and did the quilt inside. I stayed warm. My reason for the quilt inside is because I toss and turn a lot and wasn't sure I could get the quilt to stay in place on top and create drafts. With the quilt inside, I guess there is some compression, but zero drafts.
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