Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    958

    Default Is a double wall tent warmer ?

    How much warmer would a Hexamid be with bug netting type inner? How much warmer with a solid inner ? Which would you rather use with a Hexamid or tarp a inner net tent or a bivy sack ? In below freezing temps.

    Thanks thom

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-03-2015
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Age
    66
    Posts
    72

    Default

    A bivy sac for sure.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    772

    Default

    Anything but a bivy sack, due to condensation from one's breath.

    Generally, solid inner will be warmer than a
    noseeum bug net inner, which will be warmer than a
    mosquito net inner, which will be warmer than
    nothing.

    Below freezing you don't need any bug netting. You could just go for a warmer bag. If you opt for some sort of inner, consider what sort of space and ventilation you have. If it's really confined like a bivy, you'll trap condensation and airflow, even behind netting (zip up in a bivy indoors for a awhile - you'll see). That condensation will eventually make you colder and uncomfortable. But the same material barrier for a large inner may get you through the night with minimal impact.

    IMO below freezing a double wall tent (big enough to sit up in) with some gable vents and a cracked "door" (to promote some minor airflow) would be ideal.

    If you're intent on a tarp-like structure, I'd go for no inner, but maybe a bigger warmth margin with your bag.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-16-2015
    Location
    Chaumont,Ny
    Posts
    958

    Default

    I’m not a bivy fan.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheyou View Post
    I’m not a bivy fan.
    I'm a fan ... of the idea.

    The reality though, in most conditions and for most applications, is bleak.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    12-28-2011
    Location
    Prince George, BC
    Posts
    61

    Default

    For temps around freezing or below (say to 20F) .. consider a Black Diamond Eldorado or ITent. The single wall design is really great for any breeze that you might experience at those temps. My wife is extremely cold-blooded, and this has been our solution to keep her warm for the past couple of decades - in addition to a Western Mountaineering 'Lynx' sleeping bad (-10F). Way overkill for most folks, but this is what is needed for us to backpack in nighttime temps down to 20F.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    I'm a fan ... of the idea.

    The reality though, in most conditions and for most applications, is bleak.
    This ^


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Let me go

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-03-2015
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Age
    66
    Posts
    72

    Default

    The option was a Hexamid or a bevy sac in freeing temps. A bivy sac is a better choice for staying warmer. I haven't used my ivy in years as I much prefer my Hilleburg Soulo for colder temps although it is not the lightest option. It can however handle whatever Mother Nature throws at it.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Decibel View Post
    The option was a Hexamid or a bevy sac in freeing temps. A bivy sac is a better choice for staying warmer.
    Not necessarily, IMO. We don't know enough about the conditions in which the OP would expect to use the bivy. Most bivies don't breathe well enough to avoid condensation build-up inside, which will eventually cool the user, esp. over multiple nights. Those that do breathe sufficiently are probably not so different from an inner net to be worth bringing in lieu of such a net.

    Apart from use in a 'mid, conditions play a factor. To reduce condensation buildup, you need a humidity differential between the inside and outside of the bivy, plus, ideally, a breeze to expedite the carrying away of moist air transpiring out of the bivy.

    JMO. YMMV

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    I'm a fan ... of the idea.

    The reality though, in most conditions and for most applications, is bleak.
    But in the right conditions it's great.

    I have a Gortex Bivy I used to use a lot in the winter. Put a couple of CCF pads inside with the bag and lay right in the snow. Gortex works well when your venting to very dry, cold air. Still, usually get icing around the head when it's real cold, like 10-20 below.

    I just got back from a 3 day, 2 night hike using my OR advanced bivy. I knew it wasn't going to rain until after we hiked out this morning and I needed the extra warmth of the sack. Worked out great. I was able to find a comfortable place to sleep with the bivy which would have been harder to do with a tent. We found a couple of primitive sites to spend the night at, so they were a bit rough.

    I also have a OR bug bivy and find that even with just the netting over me, it is noticeably warmer inside the netting. I used to use that with a Gatewood Cape. I'm not sure how much warmth the Cape added, but it did keep the rain off and wind out.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  11. #11
    ME => GA 19AT3 rickb's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-12-2002
    Location
    Marlboro, MA
    Posts
    6,875
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    1

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    I just got back from a 3 day, 2 night hike using my OR advanced bivy. I knew it wasn't going to rain until after we hiked out this morning and I needed the extra warmth of the sack. Worked out great. I was able to find a comfortable place to sleep with the bivy which would have been harder to do with a tent. We found a couple of primitive sites to spend the night at, so they were a bit rough.
    Undertood that this may not have been in the Whites, but good to hear you are not limiting yourself to designated campsites all the same. :-)

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rickb View Post
    Undertood that this may not have been in the Whites, but good to hear you are not limiting yourself to designated campsites all the same. :-)
    One was technically in the Pemi, but barely
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    But in the right conditions it's great.

    I have a Gortex Bivy I used to use a lot in the winter. Put a couple of CCF pads inside with the bag and lay right in the snow. Gortex works well when your venting to very dry, cold air. Still, usually get icing around the head when it's real cold, like 10-20 below.

    I just got back from a 3 day, 2 night hike using my OR advanced bivy. I knew it wasn't going to rain until after we hiked out this morning and I needed the extra warmth of the sack. Worked out great. I was able to find a comfortable place to sleep with the bivy which would have been harder to do with a tent. We found a couple of primitive sites to spend the night at, so they were a bit rough.

    I also have a OR bug bivy and find that even with just the netting over me, it is noticeably warmer inside the netting. I used to use that with a Gatewood Cape. I'm not sure how much warmth the Cape added, but it did keep the rain off and wind out.
    I have the OR bivy, Owned it for probably 8 years but slept in it only once, in a trailhead parking lot next to my car


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Let me go

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-03-2015
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Age
    66
    Posts
    72

    Default

    I used to use my OR bevy a lot in all seasons. Then I got the Nemo Obi 1 Elite for more space and it weighed less. I used that on a thru hike of the Long Trail. Now that's too heavy and I got the ZPacks Altaplex which I used on my thru hike of the Cohoes Trail. My OR bivy still has a place in my quiver though when I want to be able to sleep anywhere without worrying about the space needed to pitch a tent.

  15. #15
    Garlic
    Join Date
    10-15-2008
    Location
    Golden CO or Scottsdale AZ
    Age
    62
    Posts
    5,379
    Images
    2

    Default

    I just heard about this the other day, when I offered a free used Tarptent to a friend trying to lighten her load. She turned it down because she said it would be too cold. I never noticed enough difference to turn down a free tent!

    Of course, an air gap between cloth layers offers some insulation so yes, it will be warmer. It's up to the individual to decide whether the extra weight of the second tent layer is more effective than the same weight in clothing or sleeping bag insulation.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-03-2015
    Location
    Center Conway, NH
    Age
    66
    Posts
    72

    Default

    In the winter I feel that extra weight is worth it.

  17. #17

    Default

    Yes, it is warmer


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Let me go

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,193

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheyou View Post
    How much warmer would a Hexamid be with bug netting type inner? How much warmer with a solid inner ? Which would you rather use with a Hexamid or tarp a inner net tent or a bivy sack ? In below freezing temps.
    I think a net inner adds maybe 5 degrees of warmth, if that. It depends somewhat on the wind. The net will hold more heat with less wind and will cut the chill of the wind a fair bit. A solid inner is much warmer than a net inner, especially in the wind, maybe as much as 5 to 10 degrees? If your goal with the inner net or bivy is added warmth, in my opinion, the best bet is a warmer bag or an additional quilt over your lighter bag. An added quilt adds more warmth than either an inner tent or a bivy. As for cold vs. below freezing cold, it's all the same to me, just a matter of a few degrees.

    In below freezing temps (ie., no bugs) I don't really see the use of a net inner for the small temperature advantage. Just throwing your coat over your bag would have more impact on warmth than a net inner.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •