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  1. #1
    John B's Avatar
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    Default Help with tree ID?

    The best and only pics that I have of the tree in question. I have no clue at all. My daughter lives in Golden, CO, so that's the location.

    imagejpeg_0.jpg imagejpeg_1.jpg

  2. #2

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    It looks like a Jackfruit tree.
    "I love the unimproved works of God" Horace Kephart 1862-1931

  3. #3
    John B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwistedCF View Post
    It looks like a Jackfruit tree.
    I took the lead and looked up info on wikipedia, google search, etc. If that's indeed a jackfruit, it would be a arborvor miracle. One report said that one tree was reported to be living in south Florida and survived a 27 degree (f).

    It looks similar, but surely it can't be. In Golden, Colorado?

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Where is Dogwood when we need him?
    It certainly doesn’t look like a native tree.
    Wayne

  5. #5

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    You're right, Jackfruit wouldn't make it outside a hot house in Co. The tree in the second photo appears to have some sort of fruit/pod? that made me think of Jackfruit but unless it's some kind of genetically altered hybrid it wouldn't stand a chance. Maybe someone from Co. will chime in?
    "I love the unimproved works of God" Horace Kephart 1862-1931

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  7. #7
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    Where is Dogwood when we need him?



    ha.......

    i thought about posting the same thing....

  8. #8
    imscotty's Avatar
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    Default

    A close up of a leaf and fruit would help.

    Could that be a pawpaw tree?
    “For of all sad words of tongue or pen,
    the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


    John Greenleaf Whittier

  9. #9
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by imscotty View Post
    A close up of a leaf and fruit would help.

    Could that be a pawpaw tree?
    Not pawpaw.
    More walking, less talking.

  10. #10
    John B's Avatar
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    This is the best that I can do with enlargements.
    After looking at tree id book and comparing with what little can be seen on pics, my guess is Osage orange tree. I think it would survive in CO.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by John B; 08-31-2019 at 07:15.

  11. #11
    Registered User Turtle-2013's Avatar
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    FYI ... to the locals where I grew up in Nebraska ... Osage Orange is called Hedge Apple ... and winters are a problem for it.... BUT, I'm NOT a tree ID expert.

  12. #12
    Furlough's Avatar
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    I think maybe this is an Ohio Buckeye Tree or a Horse Chestnut Tree. The compound leaf structure is more like an Ohio Buckeye Tree/Horse Chestnut. Osage Orange is a single alternate leaf pattern. Hard to tell for sure with the pictures.

    Furlough
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L’Amour

  13. #13

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    [QUOTE=Furlough;2254124]I think maybe this is an Ohio Buckeye Tree or a Horse Chestnut Tree. The compound leaf structure is more like an Ohio Buckeye Tree/Horse Chestnut. Osage Orange is a single alternate leaf pattern. Hard to tell for sure with the pictures.
    Yes, that looks like some kind of a buckeye to me. Not osage orange, nor pawpaw.
    Dan

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    Furlough's Avatar
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    ...and the Ohio Buckeye range does include Colorado.
    "Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen." Louis L’Amour

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    Registered User soilman's Avatar
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    I don't think it is Ohio buckeye. More likely a horse chestnut. Ohio buckeye is usually found in moist woods. Horse chestnut is commonly planted in town as a street tree or in parks. From what I can tell from the pictures the leaves are arranged like the spoke of a wheel and buckeye family is the only tree or shrub that has that feature.
    More walking, less talking.

  16. #16
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
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    Not osage orange. Osage orange can handle the winters in Ohio. We also call them hedge apple mainly because the fruit is a big (3-4" diam) green ball that looks like brains. Also known as monkey fruit.
    More walking, less talking.

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    John B's Avatar
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    I think it's safe to declare it an Ohio Buckeye tree.

    My kid used this app, got the name, then did a little more digging via Google. She said the app is quite good.
    https://earthsky.org/earth/now-you-c...our-smartphone

    Two more pics snapped this a.m.
    imagejpeg_0 (1).jpg 1567261767759.JPEG

  18. #18
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John B View Post
    I think it's safe to declare it an Ohio Buckeye tree.
    I am still going with horse chestnut. Ohio buckeye only has 5 leaves. Horse chestnut has 6 or 7. I can see several whorls that have at least six leaves in your picture. I think a horse chestnut is more likely to be planted as a street three in CO versus an Ohio Buckeye.
    More walking, less talking.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by soilman View Post
    I am still going with horse chestnut. Ohio buckeye only has 5 leaves. Horse chestnut has 6 or 7. I can see several whorls that have at least six leaves in your picture. I think a horse chestnut is more likely to be planted as a street three in CO versus an Ohio Buckeye.
    I think it is a Japanese Horse Chestnut. The Horse Chestnut has a spiked fruit capsule, and the Japanese Horse Chestnut fruit is nearly spineless.

  20. #20
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    Aesculus possibly glabra or possibly a cross. I still get confused with the fruit until I can examine it more closely by cutting it open. Depending on the growing location in CO many Botanical Gardens, plant enthusiasts, plant nurseries, plant non conformists, etc attempt to grow non native plants outside of their typical growing range. This can apply to wildlife living outside of typical historical ranges. This is common especially for plants.

    Definitely not Maclura pomifera(Osage orange) or Asimina triloba(paw paw).

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