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  1. #1
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    Default Hiker advantage amid hurricane

    Just was at the local big box store and witnessed some hurricane madness. Folks really crying because there was no bottled water left, only minimal canned foods selection. Stress, bickering, children picking up on anxiety of their parents and so they are also afraid and crying.

    As a hiker, I have water purification, a portable stove, knowledge of some simple cooking and hygiene tricks, a couple weeks acceptable food, patience to wait out a storm, and the self assurance that even though it might suck just now, itíll be ok.

    Not trying to minimize a cat 4 landfall with high likely hood in my hood. Folks in certain situations and locations should without a doubt evacuate. Just saying that my hiking background makes me much less afraid than many I have seen.

    Hope all get through the storm with minimal problems, and be aware if you are traveling this weekend that flights, roads, hotels might be a bit more strained than expected.

  2. #2
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    was supposed to fly to miami tonight to see the stones tomorrow night.....

    due to weather----they bumped concert up to tonight.....

    and my flight wouldnt get in in time....

    bummed but i also didnt want to get stuck in a hurricane...

    hope all goes well with you.....

  3. #3

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    Stay safe folks, im off to New Hampshire!
    Trail Miles: 3,715.9
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    AT Map 1 Completion: 1818.9 Springer, GA - Franconia Notch, NH
    AT Map 2 Completion: 263.8 Gaps From GA - PA

  4. #4
    Some days, it's not worth chewing through the restraints.
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    I was wondering about that last night - why are they buying all this bottled water? Can't they just load up whatever containers are in the house with tap water? If I was living in that environment, having a bunch of jugs handy would certainly be on my list - along with my hiking stuff and ample supplies. I wouldn't need to get in line at the store.

    Sorta like winter up here - I always have supplies in the car, and at least a week handy in the house. I might have to trudge through the blizzard if the beer gets low - worst case scenario!

    Good luck to all in the path.

  5. #5
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    Agree with OP...we are more prepared than most just by default.

  6. #6

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    It's pretty crazy around here. A lot of people seem to be terrified of no electricity (if that even happens). People are boarding up 4-5 days before this cane hits, somewhere. I can get my boards up in a couple of hours if it happens to change directions. The rest is just camping without the views.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye View Post
    I was wondering about that last night - why are they buying all this bottled water? Can't they just load up whatever containers are in the house with tap water? If I was living in that environment, having a bunch of jugs handy would certainly be on my list - along with my hiking stuff and ample supplies. I wouldn't need to get in line at the store.
    Sounds sensible, but then again it doesn't seem that sense is as common as it once was...

    The only possible thought might be that if they have to evacuate, the pre-packaged water would be easier to move with them (depending on what kind of containers they would have and if they are completely sealable rather than just filling some pots & pans)?

  8. #8

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    I’ve had the same thought before. I don’t worry about water, electricity, or heat as I have everything I need in my hiking gear to be just fine.

    As for living in a hurricane prone area, why wouldn’t you just buy supplies before hurricane season so you don’t have to rush to prepare? I guess hikers are more prepared than the general public.

  9. #9
    illabelle's Avatar
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    It's not just water.
    When a hurricane approaches you hear about people rushing to buy plywood to board up their windows.
    Ummm, what did they do with the plywood they bought last time? Don't they still have it? Who throws usable plywood away?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by illabelle View Post
    It's not just water.
    When a hurricane approaches you hear about people rushing to buy plywood to board up their windows.
    Ummm, what did they do with the plywood they bought last time? Don't they still have it? Who throws usable plywood away?
    I live in the very heart of hurricane prone territory and stay well stocked with supplies all year, barring perishables, which I purchase days in advance of a possible hurricane. I am flabbergasted at how people rush out to buy bottled water before a storm, usually one or two days in advance. Why most of these folks don't use stored tap water is a question I can't answer. Even home appliances can easily be used (fill up the top loading clothes washer, fill up the bathtub) and 5 gallon containers are relatively cheap. As far as buying plywood, many of the purchasers are new arrivals to the area and have never had to experience a hurricane. Long time residents usually have the materials on hand.
    humor is the gadfly on the corpse of tragedy

  11. #11
    Registered User ldsailor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kestral View Post
    Just was at the local big box store and witnessed some hurricane madness. Folks really crying because there was no bottled water left, only minimal canned foods selection. Stress, bickering, children picking up on anxiety of their parents and so they are also afraid and crying.
    The same thing is going on in the Tampa Bay area of Florida, and even before the track starting changing to north, we were never suppose to see the full brunt of the storm. Heck, I had a hurricane eye go right over my house last year, so winds of a tropical storm or less should not inflict the fear and panic buying going on here. In part I blame the media for hyping these storms, but in their defense I guess if they don't and the city gets blown away, then there will be accusations that will be never ending.
    Trail Name - Slapshot
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by illabelle View Post
    It's not just water.
    When a hurricane approaches you hear about people rushing to buy plywood to board up their windows.
    Ummm, what did they do with the plywood they bought last time? Don't they still have it? Who throws usable plywood away?
    It is not needed every year so the option is get rid of it or find a spot to store it. (that much plywood takes up a lot of room) Most get rid of it one way or another. Then a few years later they just buy it again when needed.
    Yes, hiking/camping gear can solve all sorts of problems. I have about 9k gallons of water just waiting to be to used in an emergency (pool) and enough hiking food to last me at least a week. Most folk don't have the mindset or even the basic knowledge on this sort of thing so they panic.
    It is also a great excuse for acting like a fool and over reacting whilst in a semi party atmosphere.
    ./~Hi ho, hi ho, it's up the trail I go ./~

  13. #13
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Do people not own containers for water anymore?
    Bizarre.
    Wayne

  14. #14
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    One of the problems with hurricanes is the storm surge. If the water rises above your pool, or your bathtub, it gets contaminated with sewage, and chemicals like motor oil from flooded cars. Most of our filters can't handle that. Packaged water will last they that.

    When we lived in FL, we had pre cut plywood stored in a hanger in the carport. Our camping gear was always at the ready, including our water storage containers. People were scrambling to buy generators, we would be buying gas for our lantern and Coleman stove.

  15. #15
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    Bottled water companies don't make water, they make plastic containers (with the added convience of being prefilled). So that's part of that equation.

  16. #16
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    No doubt that the people fussing about the lack of bottled water at Walmart didnít think to cruise the store buying water containers.
    Wayne

  17. #17
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    Wow you all make it sound so easy . It’s not

  18. #18
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheyou View Post
    Wow you all make it sound so easy . It’s not
    no, it’s definitely not easy. It’s nerve wracking and downright scary. But.. hikers are a bit more comfortable with dealing with less than many. Hope all goes well for every one in Dorian’s path. It’s a cat 5 now, sustained winds 180 mph. I’m not ready for that. Is anyone? I will have water, food, confidence, but will I have a roof? I hope so. Even with insurance (2% hurricane deductible) I can’t afford a big hit.

    Best to all.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by kestral View Post
    no, it’s definitely not easy. It’s nerve wracking and downright scary. But.. hikers are a bit more comfortable with dealing with less than many. Hope all goes well for every one in Dorian’s path. It’s a cat 5 now, sustained winds 180 mph. I’m not ready for that. Is anyone? I will have water, food, confidence, but will I have a roof? I hope so. Even with insurance (2% hurricane deductible) I can’t afford a big hit.

    Best to all.
    As long as it stays offshore you should be spared 100+ mph winds. You will probably see 80ish mph. I'm north of you and am expecting 70ish gusts. Keep an eye on what it does after leaving the Bahamas. It's going real slow right now so that might allow it to ride the gulf stream up and away from land. Steady as she goes.

  20. #20
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    As hikers we might be able to boil water or hunker down with some patience but I dont see how most folks backpacking gear and specialized ABC named trails hiking skills adequately address storm surge and flying dagger like debris in Cat 4 or 5 winds.

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