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  1. #1
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    Default Protein diet vs gout

    I am a section hiker recently diagnosed with gout, a form of arthritis that results from too much protein that forms uric acid crytals which create joint swelling/pain/etc.

    Doc prescribed allopurinol; daily dose to control uric acid levels to inhibit relapse.

    What are ya'lls' thoughts on protein needs over a 2 week section hike vs the risk of relapse?

    Anyone else out there dancing with gout but still hiking?

    This may be misplaced in "General"; perhaps we need an "Old Foggies" forum?

  2. #2

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    I don't suffer from it, however the doctor should have advised you on some items to avoid. Alcohol is a big one. Anything high in iron (no liver).

    And exercise/walking is encouraged. Joints are painful, but moving them helps flush the acid.
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/315732.php

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    I have been on allopurinol for several years with no relapses and no issues at all with hikes. You need to have blood tests once a year to monitor your uric acid levels (and kidney functionality)- but for the most part you can put it in the "take the medicine and forget about it" category.

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    Beans and wine were triggers for me at first. Then years later I no longer was able to drink beer without a flare. Then red meat. Then mushrooms. You need to learn what your food is that causes flares. Allopurinol does work. Cherries are a natural remedy also.

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    So what was the time delay between eating the catalyst and having the symptoms?

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    I've been dealing with it for years without daily medication. I prefer diet & exercise. A few things I have found out: Exercise is the most important! The more active I am the more I can cheat on my diet with no effect. Also water quality Also something not mentioned as far as I know is water quality. I noticed symptoms when my diet hadn't changed but the water source did. When they had a high calcium or limestone content, it caused a painful but not completely debilitating reaction.

    While hiking I find water quality about the best you can get. For food I avoid beef & pork. As I said before being active allows me some cheats. When working a homestaed I would even have a few beers a day if I was chopping wood. Something that when less active would be a trigger for me.

  7. #7

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    I would question the idea that eating meat causes gout. What else are you eating?

  8. #8

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    Actually a lot of vegetarians get gout, and there is a connection with sugar.
    https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/side-effects/gout

  9. #9
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    Good Morning,

    No one responded to your question "What are ya'lls' thoughts on protein needs over a 2 week section hike vs the risk of relapse?"

    I can't respond specifically to gout based on personal experience ... but ... since you are likely to be eating a higher carb diet on the trail anyway, and exercising a great deal ... the chance of a relapse while hiking is at least less likely. Note that the Article the RocDoc posted the link to is a vegetarian "low-carb" diet. Lower carb, hence higher protein is the issue whether you are a vegan or not.

    It is pretty easy to control excessive protein intake while hiking. In my experience, it is easy to be on a lower protein, higher carb diet on the trail than the reverse.

    Also ... the real reason I'm responding is that since you are a section hiker ... unless you are VERY SLENDER ... specific diet is far less important on the trail than for a thru hiker. You can easily avoid anything that might be a problem, even eat a highly unbalanced diet, and you will be off the trail before there are real effects. If you are like me and carry a few extra pounds, you can even eat light, and live a bit off the "fat of the land" (that is the fat you are carrying in your body), without suffering any negative effects.

    Basically ... don't over think it ... get on the trail and walk ... eat the foods that are easy to carry, avoiding obvious triggers ... and have fun. It will be the best possible combination towards getting your body back on track....

    Turtyl

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turtle-2013 View Post
    Good Morning,

    No one responded to your question "What are ya'lls' thoughts on protein needs over a 2 week section hike vs the risk of relapse?"

    I can't respond specifically to gout based on personal experience ... but ... since you are likely to be eating a higher carb diet on the trail anyway, and exercising a great deal ... the chance of a relapse while hiking is at least less likely. Note that the Article the RocDoc posted the link to is a vegetarian "low-carb" diet. Lower carb, hence higher protein is the issue whether you are a vegan or not.

    It is pretty easy to control excessive protein intake while hiking. In my experience, it is easy to be on a lower protein, higher carb diet on the trail than the reverse.

    Also ... the real reason I'm responding is that since you are a section hiker ... unless you are VERY SLENDER ... specific diet is far less important on the trail than for a thru hiker. You can easily avoid anything that might be a problem, even eat a highly unbalanced diet, and you will be off the trail before there are real effects. If you are like me and carry a few extra pounds, you can even eat light, and live a bit off the "fat of the land" (that is the fat you are carrying in your body), without suffering any negative effects.

    Basically ... don't over think it ... get on the trail and walk ... eat the foods that are easy to carry, avoiding obvious triggers ... and have fun. It will be the best possible combination towards getting your body back on track....

    Turtyl
    Best response yet, other than ask your doctor.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DripDry View Post
    I have been on allopurinol for several years with no relapses and no issues at all with hikes. You need to have blood tests once a year to monitor your uric acid levels (and kidney functionality)- but for the most part you can put it in the "take the medicine and forget about it" category.

    +1 on the above. I've also been on allopurinol for a while with no relapses. I also carry indomethacin and colcrys against flareups but couldn't tell you the last time that I needed them.

    I eat rather indiscriminately while on the trail but agree it is a lower protein/higher carb diet; avoid your known triggers. I also agree that exercise helps.

    Don't just take advice from here, my professional engineering opinion ( for what it's worth ) is to consult your doctor.
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  12. #12
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    For those who had gout; I have no idea what my triggers are. It would help to know the expected delay between intake of the "trigger" and onset of the symptoms. What is the average in those of you that have/had gout and the onset?? That could help me figure out what triggers me. . . . ! I hope the answer isn't "it differs with everyone . . .".

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    It differs with everybody. < Sorry >

    Try to keep track of what you eat. Intentionally inflict yourself to confirm?

    Its been so long that I don’t remember what triggered me. So long as it’s not Klondike’s, Little Debby and cheese balls, I’m ok.
    76 HawkMtn w/Rangers
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithjv View Post
    For those who had gout; I have no idea what my triggers are. It would help to know the expected delay between intake of the "trigger" and onset of the symptoms. What is the average in those of you that have/had gout and the onset?? That could help me figure out what triggers me. . . . ! I hope the answer isn't "it differs with everyone . . .".
    I know and learned that beans are a major cause for me. Eat baked beans and three days later I have full on gout.

  15. #15
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    So to summarize the above . . . I guess I will hope the allopurinol will curb the gout and back off on the protein for a little more carb just to hedge my bet.
    Can I have a "Amen" from the audience?? or did I miss the mark??

  16. #16

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    I question the protein cause, my go doctors recommendation was much more nuanced than that. Google gout diet to see trigger foods. For me it is a problem of accumulation over time. Alcohol, shellfish, cured/organ meats (hotdogs,pepperoni,salami), and sugar. Dehydration seems to be a trigger as well. I have quit sugar, lessened beer, and am keep in mind other triggers.

    As was said don’t worry too much about protein on trail. I try to get mine with nuts mostly and go light on jerky and cured meets. Carrying indomethacin is a great idea for flare ups it acts fairly quickly. I have not had a flare up on trail but have run through them and it was bearable.

  17. #17

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    You could ask your actual doctor, who knows your medical history.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

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