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  1. #1
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    Default Bug Situation in CO

    What's the bug pressure looking like this season in the Rockies? Being a high snow year, did everything just melt and now the bugs are horrid?

    Contemplating whether or not a bug net for the tarp and/or head is needed for a trip on the CT.

    Most reports I've read said bugs aren't so bad in CO and most are gone by August 1st. The remaining can be mitigated by campsite selection. But being still lots of snow around, is there year atypical for bugs?

    I'll be sleeping under a tarp on some polycro. Cant decide whether or not the bivy is necessary or if a head net will suffice for those just in case moments.

    Thanks


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  2. #2
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    We've made 4 BP trips (and lots of mere day trips) so far in our backcountry, including some time on the CT (few days ago), and it is definitely a high bug year, my poor wife who attracts them worse than most for some reason has been "eaten alive". Campsite selection does help, but even the best high/dry locations are still buggy. I would also say it's more like mid August is when they tend to get much better, except very high above treeline.

    My headnet is maybe an ounce, well worth it, we now always carry them June-mid August. Tough call on the Bivy, probably not necessary for bugs. Even though I'm calling it a high bug year, this isn't Minnesota, etc.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    We've made 4 BP trips (and lots of mere day trips) so far in our backcountry, including some time on the CT (few days ago), and it is definitely a high bug year, my poor wife who attracts them worse than most for some reason has been "eaten alive". Campsite selection does help, but even the best high/dry locations are still buggy. I would also say it's more like mid August is when they tend to get much better, except very high above treeline.

    My headnet is maybe an ounce, well worth it, we now always carry them June-mid August. Tough call on the Bivy, probably not necessary for bugs. Even though I'm calling it a high bug year, this isn't Minnesota, etc.
    Rob
    Being such a high snow year you think by mid September water will still be plentiful? Never saw a bug a few years ago during September on CL so did t plan on any bug gear this year... thoughts


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  4. #4
    Registered User colorado_rob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saltysack View Post
    Rob
    Being such a high snow year you think by mid September water will still be plentiful? Never saw a bug a few years ago during September on CL so did t plan on any bug gear this year... thoughts
    For your 1st half of hike, assuming you're going NOBO (which I seem to remember you doing), you should be golden with water. I believe there will be lots of perma-snow this year in the San Juans, we'll see soon, heading down next week, then two weeks later, expecting to spend lots of time on crampons, etc (not on the CT, but climbing peaks).

    In the middle of the trail, the Collegiate east might be kinda dry, normal for that time of year, but I expect the west side should be wetter than normal for September with plenty of water sources. Not sure once past collegiates, I suspect moderately dry, wetter than most years, but some water sources might be drying up a bit. Things sure were flowing strong a few days ago! Still, two months from now is a lot of drying time.

    Once you get close to Denver, sections 6-1, you will have to pay attention to water sources, as usual for September, as the huge snowpack from the last winter will be long gone way before you get there. I assume you have Guthook and can check water updates? Handy app.

    Here's a shot looking south from near the top of Mt. Massive from jus a couple days ago, basically looking out over the Collegiates. Way more leftover snow than usual for late July.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    For your 1st half of hike, assuming you're going NOBO (which I seem to remember you doing), you should be golden with water. I believe there will be lots of perma-snow this year in the San Juans, we'll see soon, heading down next week, then two weeks later, expecting to spend lots of time on crampons, etc (not on the CT, but climbing peaks).

    In the middle of the trail, the Collegiate east might be kinda dry, normal for that time of year, but I expect the west side should be wetter than normal for September with plenty of water sources. Not sure once past collegiates, I suspect moderately dry, wetter than most years, but some water sources might be drying up a bit. Things sure were flowing strong a few days ago! Still, two months from now is a lot of drying time.

    Once you get close to Denver, sections 6-1, you will have to pay attention to water sources, as usual for September, as the huge snowpack from the last winter will be long gone way before you get there. I assume you have Guthook and can check water updates? Handy app.
    Thx kind of what I assumed..Love the Guthook app!


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