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  1. #1
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    Default How worth it is a sleeping pad? [solved]

    This has been sufficiently answered but you may still reply if you want.

    I've seen a lot of emphasis on sleeping pads and how important they are for warmth and comfort, but i've never used them. I've camped in hot and cold, wet weather without them, and for an unfortunate winter had to sleep on a cement floor with only a blanket.
    That all said, I don't quite see myself needing one, but I am also new to Thru-Hiking and I am completely open to hearing other opinions and perspectives.

    Thanks for reading
    Last edited by wanderlyst; 07-19-2019 at 09:09.

  2. #2

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    Consider your ability to sleep on any surface a blessing of sorts.

    Basically, you could get away with using a 2-3 oz ccf pad while others are toting around 16oz + sleeping pads to be comofortable.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by wanderlyst View Post
    I've seen a lot of emphasis on sleeping pads and how important they are for warmth and comfort, but i've never used them. I've camped in hot and cold, wet weather without them, and for an unfortunate winter had to sleep on a cement floor with only a blanket.
    That all said, I don't quite see myself needing one, but I am also new to Thru-Hiking and I am completely open to hearing other opinions and perspectives.

    Thanks for reading
    you will want a pad
    in cold weather it's ESSENTIAL

    What do your mother and father think? Have you asked them?

    Welcome to white blaze!

  4. #4
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    the ground will suck the heat out of you....

    it's a form of insulation from that...

    so, unless you like to sleep cold, then it's pretty much essential..

    its the same as sleeping on a non heated water bed.....

    plus, its more comfortable than sleeping directly on ground....

  5. #5
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    Default

    Thank you all for the replies - it's good to know that a pad is an essential and not purely a comfort thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by trailmercury View Post
    you will want a pad
    in cold weather it's ESSENTIAL

    What do your mother and father think? Have you asked them?

    Welcome to white blaze!

    It was left completely up to me to research and fund my Thru-Hike, so asking I just got a "go look it up". I did not see any other questions like this so i asked. Thank you for responding!
    I swear to insane I'm not God
    Excited to start a(most likely NoBo) Thru-Hike April of 2020 with my dog.

  6. #6

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    Well, it's hard to imagine how one could sleep on a concrete floor in winter with only a blanket. I suppose I could do it for one night (not getting much sleep) but, for a four to six month thru hike . . . yikes!!! I guess if you are super human enough to do it and get enough rest, go for it but, I'd guess greater than 99.99% of us mere mortals wouldn't last two nights.

  7. #7

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    your dog will most likely need something under it too

  8. #8
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    If you dont feel the need for a pad. Get a gossamer gear 1/8th pad for thru hiking.

    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk

  9. #9

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    When I was around 17 I hiked with a 1/8" mat, sometimes none in the summer, and didn't care either. But it matters when it's cold in the mountains and if you're hiking day after day your body will appreciate it.
    It's also not efficient to cart around other gear to keep you warm and then lose so much warmth underneath you

  10. #10
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    Thank you all for the replies.
    I swear to insane I'm not God
    Excited to start a(most likely NoBo) Thru-Hike April of 2020 with my dog.

  11. #11

    Default How worth it is a sleeping pad?

    I have not owned a pad for 10 years at least until I turned 22. I got by, even in the winter but it wasnít because I could sleep on cold concrete... an effort was always made to get some kind of natural insulating layer between me and the cold. FWIW ... it may be urban legend but we were always warned to insulate kidneys from prolonged laying on cold surface like a ledge, snow or sleeping in deep winter, sub zero temperatures on the food shelves in abandoned summer camp kitchen. So in those circumstances we laid on our belly with our hands under our belly.

    If you can just lay on ice and sleep all night without consequences then Iím envious.

    Cheers


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    Last edited by T.S.Kobzol; 07-18-2019 at 19:35.
    Let me go

  12. #12
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    There were no pads available when I was young and I slept on the ground no matter what.
    And yes, I developed kidney problems that only went away after I got a CCF pad and stopped skinny dipping in ice-cold lakes.

  13. #13
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    Some of my very best nights have been on a Therm-a-Rest. If I were poor, I would use it instead of a mattress.
    Be Prepared

  14. #14
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    Your perspective is out of the box, enough so to wonder where it comes from? But I hiked with a friend of mine who unbeknownst to be before our planned 4day/3night trip, hiked without a pad. First night on clumpy grass didn't work that well, and neither did a shelter floor the second night. So, our third night was hiking nearly 17 miles to the car so he could go home. He thought he didn't need one, I presume from some experience. My opinion is if you're asking, then you likely need one, despite supposed experience.

    However, what you can do is take something that is at least minimal so that you can test your ability to go without, but reach into the pack as needed. A 1/2" ccf pad is probably the best for insulation and likely works well for you to lay on, though it can be bulky. As a hammock hanger, I often take a Klymit Xlite pad that weighs 6oz and rolls up very small - as a just-in-case item. The padding is more substantial than you would think and the "holes" allow some loft insulation from your bag.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  15. #15
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    Just my opinion. Get something light and not bulky, like a z lite short or one of the new Nemo Switchback short pads, and be done with it. Happy hiking.

  16. #16

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    I wouldn't go without one. Insulation and cushioning is very important to me.
    ./~Hi ho, hi ho, it's up the trail I go ./~

  17. #17
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    If for no other reason, at least on colder nights, I'd imagine that an 8 oz closed cell foam (CCF) sleeping pad would allow you to get buy with 8 oz less insulation on top of you. In planning for an emergency while winter climbing, I always carry a CCF pad for ground insulation, but often rely just on my warm clothing for top insulation.

    CCF pads, they add so much and cost so little.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  18. #18

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    Agree, the Z-lite is a great option. . .

  19. #19

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    I would say that a sleeping pad is option if you are young and healthy, essential if you are older.

  20. #20
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    I see you're 16 years old according to you profile. Enjoy it while you can. I used to sleep with just a sleeping bag on concrete (camping out for football and basketball tickets). Not very comfortable, but doable in my youth. Still, it would have been worth an extra pound for an okay padding had I been a hiker back then and had any idea such things existed.

    You say you've gotten by in the winter. I'd be careful there. The colder it gets, the more costly it will be to have been overconfident. If it even has a chance of getting colder than you know you're prepared for, err on the side of caution and bring something to insulate you from the ground.

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