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Thread: Hot, Hot , Hot

  1. #21

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    This works well for afternoon naps on the trail...

    https://hummingbirdhammocks.com/prod...e-plus-hammock

    7.6oz + 1.55oz for the straps.

    A slight breeze underneath cools your back nicely too.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  2. #22
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    Get up early, hike til it gets too hot. Take a siesta and hike til its dark.

  3. #23

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    Your body increases its ability to handle heat (heat acclimatization) with repeated exposure to heat. If you are going to be hiking in hot weather, you need to start the acclimatization process 2-3 weeks before hand by exposing yourself to the heat every day and gradually increasing the time you are in the heat and sweating profusely. There are lots of resources online that discuss how to do this safely. You will still be miserable in 95 degree humid weather but your body will be able to handle it better physiologically.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  4. #24
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    One can also choose the trails or trail sections that are cooler ie; shaded, well watered, higher elev., ridges where more wind is likely, greater latitude, etc. It wouldn't be my preferred choice to NOBO the AZT starting in June at the southern terminus or the BMT or Grand Enchantment Tr or Florida Tr...OR southeastern AT lowest elevation sections during the humidity and heat of summer. Again, take a hint from Nature. Wildlife finds shaded cooler valleys or low spots where its cooler or head to the mountains.

    Reliably warm temps is when I'm more inclined to hike wet in the rain without rainwear. Summer rains backpacking leads me to the life.

  5. #25
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    Hike slower, less miles, take more breaks, replace electrolytes (I use Endurolyte capsules, they've always worked great for me).

    I like the idea of taking an afternoon break/nap.

  6. #26

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    -adequate hydration; start and stay hydrated.
    -use electrolyte replacement tabs, mixes, etc.
    -no caffeine; it reduces heat tolerance.
    -lightest, most breathable clothing practical; thin synthetics with an open weave made for running are best.

    For dayhiking, pack a hydration bladder with ice, then top off with water, freeze bottom half of water bottles, etc. Hyperthermia is from core temp getting too high, so anything that cools you off inside or out is a plus.

    Knowing and accepting the conditions ahead of time, and keeping a good attitude makes a big difference. Dealing with the heat is psychological as well as physiological.

    I used >4L on a 18 mile dayhike this week. "S. Cheaha"/Skyway Loop for any familiar with the AL Pinhoti and Cheaha SP.
    UA running shirt, hydration bladder filled with ice, extra water bottles, electrolyte tabs in the hipbelt pockets, Buff for my bald head(and keeping gnats out of my ears). Being well acclimated to heat and humidity, plus starting early and finishing before it got hotter in the afternoon, I never felt overheated, and the accompanying cloud of gnats during the 6+ mile Skyway Trail was the main source of discomfort.
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    Don't just embrace the suck; address it.

  7. #27
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    After the thunderstorms rolled through Saturday, completely different environment on Sunday. Did a nice, pleasant 11 mile hike up North and South Twin. The views over the Pemigiwassett were pretty good for a Summer day. The bugs were way more tolerable. Never put my bugnet on for the first time this hiking season.

  8. #28
    Coach Lou coach lou's Avatar
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    81 degrees......no wind on Mtn. Madison Friday!

  9. #29
    Registered User LittleRock's Avatar
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    Yep, most of us down south are sitting in the A/C, waiting for September.

    Went for a 5 mile run at 6 AM this morning and was dripping wet with sweat by the end.
    It's all good in the woods.

  10. #30
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    Only 90 out ? Sounds like nice spring weather to us folks down in Texas My hot weather advice is:
    - plan to make miles in the early morning (starting at the crack of dawn and take a siesta from 1-6)
    - hammocks are great for hot weather siestas
    - carry way more water than you think you'll need - yes, it's heavy but it's a safety thing
    - drink lots of fluids and drink often (of course)
    - try to stay out of the direct sun (umbrellas can help with this, big brimmed hats are also good)
    - take your time - if you need to go slow then go slow, hot temperatures will slow most people down
    - wear loose fitting, light colored clothes
    - Gatorade powder or other electrolytes are really important (too much straight water can lead to hyponatremia, which is very dangerous) I like to add Gatorade to every 2nd or 3rd bottle of water that I consume depending on how I'm feeling
    - a bandanna soaked in water and wrapped around the neck helps some
    - listen to your body - if you start feeling light headed or your skin is feeling clammy, take a long break and hydrate
    - if you stop sweating that is a dangerous sign that you are in the early stages of heat stroke and you need to take it very seriously: stop hiking, hydrate, dunk yourself in a creek, do whatever you can to cool off ASAP

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleRock View Post
    Yep, most of us down south are sitting in the A/C, waiting for September.

    Went for a 5 mile run at 6 AM this morning and was dripping wet with sweat by the end.
    Went cycling at 0630...dripping wet with sweat and becoming so dizzy, I had to walk up the last hill to my house, stopping to rest when I thought I’d pass out.

    Ugh! Is it my age? This sucks!

  12. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traffic Jam View Post
    Ugh! Is it my age? This sucks!
    Humidity's just starting to drop around that time. From 4-6am is when it's worst. I work night shift, and if busy, will sweat more in early morning than I do all day if I work over on day shift, or come in on evening shift. Temps may be 20F higher during the day, but the humidity will often be 40% lower.

  13. #33

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    Ok, tried some advice and it works, sometimes. Went with the Mrs. on some local trails. (Camp Mack just off the Horseshoe trail.) Did better then before but by 11:30 A.M. is was Hot. (95F+) Thankful, The Pretzel Hut has some good Ice Cream. MM good!

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    Knowing and accepting the conditions ahead of time, and keeping a good attitude makes a big difference. Dealing with the heat is psychological as well as physiological.
    Don't just embrace the suck; address it.
    All, well said!

    Hiking in the heat is psychologically similar to hiking in the rain or cold or....

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasBob View Post
    Your body increases its ability to handle heat (heat acclimatization) with repeated exposure to heat. If you are going to be hiking in hot weather, you need to start the acclimatization process 2-3 weeks before hand by exposing yourself to the heat every day and gradually increasing the time you are in the heat and sweating profusely. There are lots of resources online that discuss how to do this safely. You will still be miserable in 95 degree humid weather but your body will be able to handle it better physiologically.
    Yep. Don't expect to go from an office/home environment that is a constant 72į to extreme heat and perform well. It doesn't take long but you have to get your body and mind used to working in this weather.
    You can walk in another person's shoes, but only with your feet

  16. #36
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    Iíll stick to the water sports for hot weather! Much prefer cooler weather hiking.....canít wait to get back to CT September 10.....probably nobo to let that miserable first 25 miles cool off!!!


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