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Thread: Hot, Hot , Hot

  1. #1

    :banana Hot, Hot , Hot

    Today just West of The Doyles Hotel it was 98F!! How in the world do you hike in such temps? Last week I felt like I was going to pass out in hiking such high temps. I drank a lot but still..it's very hot. Anyone got a clue to deal with high temps?

  2. #2

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    Yea, don't hike between 10 AM and 10 PM. Other then that, not much you can do but suffer.

    Hot up here in the mountains of NH too, it's been in the 90's and on the humid side this last week. Looks like it will now stay that way for the duration. The heat brought out the bugs again too. Black flies were annoying yesterday and I pulled two ticks off me last night. As bad as the heat is here, I'd hate to be in PA right now.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  3. #3

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    Get moving early, stop at 10:30 and nap until 4:30.
    I met a thru hiker from England last week, and that's what he was doing due to his inability to tolerate 90į temperatures.
    I believe our southern neighbors call it a siesta. The middle of the day is just too hot sometimes.
    .
    Or you could move down here to Florida and help me paint houses outside this summer. You will find the hiking to still be hot, but at least tolerable, after acclimating to those sorts of temperatures.

  4. #4

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    Start hiking before first light, take a 3-4h meal/nap in the middle of the day (hammock works well), then hike until just before itís too dark to setup camp. Another trick is at each stream wet/cool down your pulse points (places you can feel your pulse). There are cooling towels made for this. It tricks your body into cooling down. And of course lots of water combined with electrolyte capsules.

    https://www.popsci.com/heat-keep-bod...m_medium=email

    Thatís all I have...


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  5. #5
    John B's Avatar
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    I don't alter my routine in the slightest. I embrace the suck, so to speak, by acknowledging that, yes, it's really hot and, yes, it's less than ideal hiking conditions, but then just going ahead and doing it and not focusing on the discomfort.

    In the past, I did a lot of distance running, which is really all about how much one is willing to suffer, so maybe that was good training for me.

    I remember a line from the documentary Running on Sun , which is about the Badwater Ultra, and one participant, an active duty Marine Corps sergeant, said,
    "It's all about mind over matter -- if you don't mind, it don't matter."

  6. #6
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    I hate hot weather. I did some trail maintenance tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday on the GNLT, cutting up blowdowns and the like. It was really too hot to work, too buggy to take clothes off. Hiking back up East Bald Pate yesterday morning, I couldn't drink enough to stay hydrated. I felt my skin drying out so I know I was pretty close to a heat injury. I finally stopped on the summit for half an hour to let my body process the water I'd already drunk. Damn bugs. After that, it was mostly down hill back to Grafton Notch in the shade. I'm spending today in front of the AC. Maybe another hike on Sunday.

  7. #7
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    Ninety plus degrees in the whites and the views are not great as there are wildfires in Quebec that combine with the humidity to make things decidedly "soupy". Funny thing is there are still a couple of snowfields up on the summits.

    Water is not enough in these conditions, hikers can deplete their electrolytes by drinking water only. A electrolyte replacement is needed. Morton's Lite salt works well as its a mix of sodium and potassium chloride. Pedialyte is also available as a powder. I did a long hike yesterday in the Garfield Galehead area of the whites and was pumping Nuuns all day.

  8. #8

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    Speaking of cool down points, when I get to a stream I take a small rock out of the water and place it against my jugular. Then take another rock and put it on my wrist. Finish off by splashing water on my face, rinsing out my bandana and putting it wet back on my head. All that helps for about 5 minutes. Of course, it helps to come across a cold running stream a couple of times during the day.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  9. #9
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    I was hiking in 80 degree weather this week and found just that to be miserable. While I could usually find ways to stay cool enough, my real issue was being wet from sweat all day long. After a couple of days, my arm pits (and other places) were getting sore and irritated.

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    Some good answers were given.

    1) Night hike
    2) Start early/siesta al mediodia/hike late until around sunset
    3) Pre hike comfort zone expansion as part of the pre hike prep
    a. I turn up the AC or turn it off
    b. Opt for bike ride instead of AC equipped automobile
    c. Sleep outside

    Three biggest factors for me as a Landscape Designer, summer sports player, summer backpacker are 1) getting a full nights sleep 2) H2O a. ditch alcohol&coffee(eat expresso beans instead) 3) Change diet to hot weather humidity oriented.

    To this, pace thyself. No need to go balls to the wall all the time.

  11. #11
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    I can relate! We just did the section from glencliff to Hanover. Temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s. At least a million mosquitoes, all of them hungry. I brought some Propel for electrolytes but I thought it tasted awful so I gave it to a sobo thru hiker. About all we could do to survive the heat was walking real slow and taking breaks to cool down

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    It's not always a matter of just sucking it up. Some people do better in the heat that others, everyone has different levels of fitness and aside from that, different abilities to deal with heat. My spouse played several sets of hard tennis last summer during a hot streak and had plenty of time to cool down in between but over the week apparently her electrolytes became depleted despite what she felt were plenty of fluids with electrolytes - one night she complained of severe cramps in her calves then passed out cold. Luckily she was standing in front of her recliner. It would really suck to have such an episode in the wrong place on the trail. It was a pretty scary experience, we checked her pulse because we did not know if she had a massive coronary or what, she was out cold for the 4-5 minutes it took for the police to get to our house so not just a little faint. So, sure, just suck it up but hydrate like hell with plenty of electrolytes and if you just feel like crap or tired then stop and give yourself a break. The trail will still be there later. If you are one of those heat worshipers who are unphased by it then all the more power to you but many people are physically not up to that, even when in great shape.

  13. #13

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    There's "hiking" and then there's "backpacking"---and the OP didn't make it clear which is which---definitely important when going backpacking in the HEAT for weeks at a time---versus just a "mere" dayhike.

    I just got back from a 21 day backpacking trip on July 4th in the TN mountains and yes the bugs were bad and the temps high.

    There are two schools of thought when you're out for the duration---seek campsites at high elevation or seek camps by rivers and creeks. Ultimately, I myself personally want to be camping next to a wilderness creek so I can go swimming on an hourly basis---which cools the core and if you stay submerged long enough you can achieve a bit of hypothermia which really cools down the body for several hours in a hot camp.

    Like with winter backpacking, you get used to the heat and backpacking in a furnace eventually. Even just the movement of going 1 mile per hour produces a sort of breeze against your skin. Oh---and never take a backpacking reststop in direct sunlight---always shoot for shade on the trail.

    Which reminds me---when seeking a campsite if possible always try to find one in Deep Shade---which is different than just regular shade. Deep Shade is 2 or 3 layers deep under a thick canopy, preferably in a forest under a dark rhodo patch---and by water.

  14. #14
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    Food and drink choices play a role in cooling us down. Put some lemon and mint/peppermint/cilantro or cucumber slices in water. So many upscale Hawaiian resorts have pitchers of these in their lobby entrance areas. Coconut water; make it from a powder. Think seasonal. Mrs Nature knows! Incorporate leafy greens, broccoli, zuchinni, radishes, cantaloupe/watermelon/honeydew, banana, cherries, peaches, grapes, plums, nectarines, fennel, fresh dill, etc. Some of these have dried versions but I'm willing to eat my water more often too during summer as I'm getting so much more fresh whole food goodness that brings comfort and performance.


    Avoid or eliminate hot spicy foods and herbs like hot peppers or cayenne. Avoid high saturated fat, hydrogenated trans fats, heavy protein intakes en masse as it will deplete energy stores to digest or eliminate. Dont eat huge meals as it does the same! So many talk about sodium when it's super hot like it's always good. Quite the contraire. Too much Na leads to dehydration AND MANY highly processed heavily packaged food like products slip it in en masse. This includes some dehydrated big brand backpacking meals! This is the same food category that so often has hidden and clear added high sugar contents that mess with sustaining energy and blood sugar levels that are also often low in fiber and wider nutrition. The cumulative affects can often be substantial to those accustomed to the SAD.

  15. #15

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    I sweat well above average and the really hot days present a challenge. In the past I have hiked from 4-11 am, and then still later in the day but at a leisurely pace with long stretches off, and then pick back up in the evening. I won't do a 3,000 foot incline in the afternoon on the hottest days in July...

    Certain days have worked out where I get on the trail around 4:30 or 5 am, and then am tired by around noon and done pretty big mileage. I will try and stop somewhere at high elevation for "cooler" resting conditions, and then resume with a downhill later in the afternoon if possible

    This can't always be done, but often enough it works out.

  16. #16
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    I use my engineer's knowledge of heat transfer. When air temps meet or exceed body temp, you must pay close attention to removing heat from the body. This can be done by convection, conduction, and evaporation. Convection in a breeze, conduction by, say sitting in cold water or hiking in the rain, and evaporation by sweating or wetting a headband or garment.

    When I hike on a hot day, I do all I can to support the perspiration system. Keep in mind it loses its effectiveness in high humidity, but unfortunately that doesn't keep your body from sweating anyway. You need to stay hydrated in order to keep sweating, and you need to replace the minerals lost.

    You should also be familiar with the signs, symptoms, and treatment of heat injuries. I found myself getting dizzy one hot afternoon on the AT, and that was the end of my hiking that day. That's brain cells we're talking about.

    On my hot days on the AT, I usually kept hiking all day but I took breaks wherever I could find a breeze, and let my sweat cool me off. Just lifting the hat off once in a while had a nice cooling effect. When I found running water, I'd rinse out my clothing and then put it back on wet, for extra cooling. I packed salty foods those days. I camped in breezy spots, as high as I could get.

    One day I walked past a motel late on a hot afternoon and the proprietor was out on his porch with a plate of watermelon. He offered me a rest and snack. What the heck, I ended up staying there. A/C is another valid tactic.
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  17. #17
    Registered User The Cleaner's Avatar
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    I've spent the last 30 years working outside in the tree care industry. Power line ROW Maintenance and residential tree work. Climbing, operating lifts and heavy equipment. I just wait till September. Less people, bugs and hikers.
    Sleep on the ground, rise with the sun and hike with the wind....

  18. #18
    Registered User Christoph's Avatar
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    Try a little night hiking for a little different experience.
    - Trail name: Thumper

  19. #19

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    I was Backpacking on the trail and got off the trail and came home.. it's been 95F+ for days. A good suggestion was to hike a night or very late in the day. Right now, (4:30 P.M.) it over 95F!!! Ouch! Is it safe to hike the trail at night? I'm thinking of all the rock in this state. (PA) Has anyone done night hiking on the trail?

  20. #20

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    Night hiking some parts of PA would be okay. Other parts would really slow you down. Getting through the boulder fields might be tricky with the poor depth perception and it being harder to see how the trial twists through the rubble.

    I do most of my night hiking in the fall 'cuz it gets dark so early.

    The main problem with taking the afternoon off is your not often in a good place to do that. Which is why I think carrying a little one pound hammock to use for an afternoon siesta would be worth it. It greatly increases your options for where to take a long break and be comfortable.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

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