Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Registered User QuietStorm's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-20-2017
    Location
    Towson, MD
    Age
    60
    Posts
    224

    Default Advice on shelter choices in the Whites in June

    I am primarily a hammock camper and had been planning to take my hammock on my upcoming section hike from Hanover to Gorham. I've been advised by hikers who have done this section that a hammock is ideal because of the flexibility it affords, particularly during busy seasons on the trail. I am hiking from June 15-June 28 and am planning to camp at either shelters or AMC campsites, with two hostel stays for re-supply. Can anyone with knowledge and experience in the Whites offer their thoughts on whether hammocks are feasible as a shelter option? The weight difference between taking my hammock set-up and tent with pad, etc. is less than a pound.

  2. #2

    Default Advice on shelter choices in the Whites in June

    Hammock will be a great choice on the trail except, of course above the tree line where you shouldn’t camp anyway especially in the season without a snow cover. You will find many good spots pretty much anywhere (estimating) 500 feet below the tree line.

    I have hammocked below Moosilauke (nobo), there are a few nice spots as you descend from the Kinsmans toward the lean-to, but before the Fishing Jimmy trail start, I think I tented at the campsite when going up Liberty (Liberty Spring) but I recall people hammocking. The section from Liberty to Garfield campsite is rugged and likewise from Garfield to Galehead. There are a few nice spots below the Zealand Hut...incidentally I found I needed long straps at Guyott campsite and when I tried to hang away from the campsite the trees were dense and uncooperative.
    There is are many nice spots at Ethan Pond. I’m drawing a blank on anything near Mt. Jackson and Pierce but U think there was something nice at the lowedt poing of the AT between these two. Then You need to kick ass on the presi or stay at Lakes Of The Clouds hut. There are a few nice spots on the final stretch from Pinkham to rt.2 but remember to walk off the trail (rules) for the entire trip of camping. You do have a choice of 7 hut stays and two AT lodge stays wow that will cost you over a thousand dollars haha. Happy hammocking!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Let me go

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by T.S.Kobzol View Post
    . . .You do have a choice of 7 hut stays and two AT lodge stays wow that will cost you over a thousand dollars haha. Happy hammocking!
    So, what you're suggesting is that for nearly the same price as hut to hut hiking in the Whites, you can fly to Europe and hike hut to hut in the Alps . . . because, huts in the Alps are (much to my surprise) about 1/2 as expensive to stay in as the huts in the Whites!
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  4. #4

    Default

    and the food is better and cheaper in the Alps’ huts too


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Let me go

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-27-2003
    Location
    northern whites
    Posts
    3,878

    Default

    I do not hammock but many folks are hammocking through the whites as the vast majority of shelter sites have trees suitable for hanging. Many managed shelter sites are maxed out nearly every night and the caretaker sends hikers to less than desirable tent spots with rocky uneven ground that could work well with a hammock. There are no specific hammock camping rules, the same rules apply if you tent or hang. That said the summit ridges tend to have thick/dense spruce fir forest that is difficult to bash through let alone hang a hammock, you still need to drop down off the ridge to where the understory opens up. This is frequently less of a drop than to a suitable tent spot but not much. The only real non hammock suitable stretch is from the low spot between Pierce and Eisenhower to where the Osgood trail drops off Madison into the trees. Lot to be said to book reservations at Lake of the Clouds Hut as the only options are drop off the ridge about a mile and 1000 feet (possibly less with a hammock). The Carter Moriah ridge can be thick but folks who dry camp can usually find a legal spot, if not on the trail, down a side trail.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •