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  1. #1
    Registered User John B's Avatar
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    Default Hiking hut to hut in the Whites

    Article in the May 12, 2019 edition of the NY TIMES:

    https://nyti.ms/2PV7Pqn

  2. #2
    Registered User coach lou's Avatar
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    Using the Huts is great. It allows much easier travel thru some beautiful country. The meals alone are worth the price........and the view!

  3. #3

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    Favorite hut: - I have visited all, and state at most of them. My favorite is Galehead, it is one of the smaller ones, and the views of the sunrise from the bench at the front steps was spectacular.

  4. #4

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    Great for those with lots of cash and fixed schedule but thru hikers would most likely skip a few as the normal spacing is set up for a 6 to 8 hour hike at casual pace a thruhiker will end up at the hut around lunch in many cases. Lake of the Clouds (AKA Lake of the Crowds) is the exception, the legal options for skipping it are not great. Rushing across the Presidential ridge, arguably the most spectacular stretch of the AT, in a day to try to make the RMC Perch or Valley Way tentsite is a downer unless the weather is bad.

    Hard to equate $175 a night being justified by the hut meals. Its not gourmet just fresh. Maine Huts and Trails offer far more guest space, better facilities (hot showers) and better meals with less crowded trails for less but cant match the three jewels of the AMC system, Madison, Lake of the Clouds and Greenleaf due to their location above treeline. MHT huts are down low but each have their attractions. Their "jewel" is Flagstaff hut (a short side trip from the AT 2000 mile mark on Long Fall Dam road).

    Getting reservations this late in the year is going to be tough for some of the popular huts as they get booked up on popular weekends. Tough for thruhikers to book way in advance so they need to take their chances and hike during the week and hope for cancelations.

  5. #5
    Registered User coach lou's Avatar
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    Thru Hikers are such a small percentage of the folks that the AT and the AMC service.

  6. #6

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    I agree but since this is AT oriented forum thru hikers probably want to know AT related aspects of the huts rather then see a pretty standard Ad for AMC huts that applies to well heeled adventure vacationers.

  7. #7
    Registered User scope's Avatar
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    Its costing me $175 to stay at a motel off the highway outside of Daytona. With that in mind, the huts seem like a damn fine value.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by scope View Post
    Its costing me $175 to stay at a motel off the highway outside of Daytona. With that in mind, the huts seem like a damn fine value.
    Good point, like most things in life it is a matter of perspective.
    The road to glory cannot be followed with much baggage.
    Richard Ewell, CSA General


  9. #9
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    The huts are nice. They are expensive.

    After doing the AT, presidential traverses, peakbagging, etc all over the whites.

    One day.. one day.. im gonna do a hut to hut hike and treat myself to an epic hike.

    All money aside.

    A presedntial traverse using the huts is an EPIC hike. Day pack, sleep inside above treeline, cooked meals.. sounds amazing.

    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Registered User coach lou's Avatar
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    QUOTE=fastfoxengineering;2246634]The huts are nice. They are expensive.

    After doing the AT, presidential traverses, peakbagging, etc all over the whites.

    One day.. one day.. im gonna do a hut to hut hike and treat myself to an epic hike.

    All money aside.

    A presedntial traverse using the huts is an EPIC hike. Day pack, sleep inside above treeline, cooked meals.. sounds amazing.

    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk[/QUOTE]


    ......and I can't wait to do it again!IMG_6813.JPGIMG_6838.JPG20707992_1379311322104360_1271137892502078637_n.jpgIMG_3698.JPG
    Last edited by coach lou; 05-14-2019 at 07:38.

  11. #11

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    Save up your bucks and go do the Milford and Routeburn Tracks in New Zealand. Unlike the AMC system they stock the wine at the huts instead of needing to carry it up. Hot Showers also help

  12. #12
    Registered User coach lou's Avatar
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    You know Mr. Bagger, I've figured out what you're up to........................you are trying to poo poo the Whites so we Flatlanders stay down at the beaches and leave you folks up there alone!....................................

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by coach lou View Post
    You know Mr. Bagger, I've figured out what you're up to........................you are trying to poo poo the Whites so we Flatlanders stay down at the beaches and leave you folks up there alone!....................................
    Or maybe they are just little overrated

    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk

  14. #14

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    Nope, its just the various media outlets seem to crank out variations of the same articles every year after year as it makes nice filler with pretty pictures. Unfortunately many of the folks who buy the image have a steep learning curve when they discover that a hut stay isn't a typical $175 a night experience. They are staying in unheated buildings and bunkrooms with stacks of bunks with minimal personal space. Folks going back and forth all night to use the facilities and a chorus of snoring and on occasion crying. A communal bathroom with no hot water or showers. Cramped quarters with cheek to cheek seating during meals and organized begging/extortion to tip the hut crews. Folks used to tent camping and backcountry shelters probably appreciate it but the readers of the typical high end media these articles pop up in are probably out of their element.

  15. #15
    Getting out as much as I can..which is never enough. :) Mags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Folks used to tent camping and backcountry shelters probably appreciate it but the readers of the typical high end media these articles pop up in are probably out of their element.
    Sounds about right. A very difficult trip for anyone not used to hiking or camping; pretty plush for those who backpack. OTOH, the people used to tent camping might not like the 90 people in The Lake of the Clouds...or even the 40 people of Galehead.
    Paul "Mags" Magnanti
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  16. #16

    Default In Defense of the Huts

    For thru hikers the huts offer a place to refill water, get a hot drink, have a snack, use a toilet and to get out of the rain or sun - all for free (or maybe a couple of bucks for a cup of tea or a cookie). A few thrus pay to stay overnight, and others do WFS.

    The hut croos play a valuable role for all who hike in the whites by maintaining the composting toilets and by participating in search and rescue for lost and injured hikers.

    I think Peakbagger accurately describes the hut experience and I agree that folks who were expecting the Mt. Washington hotel will have a disappointing experience. Likewise, those who are used to staying in tents and shelters my well find the hut experience not worth the money.

    There are, however, groups for whom the huts are valued. The idea of staying overnight in the wilderness is intimidating to many people. The ability to have a safe, dry, and somewhat warm place to sleep at night allows them to venture beyond day hikes and experience the mountain in a different way. Likewise, parents wanting to take their children on a hiking adventure and introduce them to the outdoors appreciate the "comforts" of the huts. There are also people with physical limitation who are able to experience multi-day hikes because they don't have to carry a shelter and a much supplies. Many of these categories of hikers will go on to less expensive and more adventuresome forms of hiking. For others, the occasional splurge on a hut stay will be the pinnacle of their wilderness experience. From their stays in the huts almost all of these people will have their appreciation for the outdoors grow, will likely become better stewards of nature, and some will become strong advocates for preservation -- even if they never spend a night in a tent or shelter.

    If you don't like the hut experience, or feel it is too expensive, that is certainly understandable, but please know that there are many people who do appreciate it and for whom the huts have played a significant role in encouraging and helping them become more confident spending time in the outdoors. So we enjoy the croos silly skits, relish the communal meals, have fun climbing into our bunk beds, and enjoy moaning about all the snoring that took place during the night while we drink our coffee and eat our breakfast in the morning.

    Happy hiking.

  17. #17
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    All $$$ aside. I still cant wait to do a hut to hut presidential traverse. Maybe when i'm old, can flash some money around, and tell tall tales about my thruhiking/peakbagging/hikertrash days.

    I've wasted more money at a bar in one weekend. Thats when I was young and dumb.

    At least the cost of the huts align with what I enjoy doing nowadays.

    Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk

  18. #18
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    How much is the tip for the crews? Anyone knows?

  19. #19
    Registered User coach lou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrum View Post
    for thru hikers the huts offer a place to refill water, get a hot drink, have a snack, use a toilet and to get out of the rain or sun - all for free (or maybe a couple of bucks for a cup of tea or a cookie). A few thrus pay to stay overnight, and others do wfs.

    The hut croos play a valuable role for all who hike in the whites by maintaining the composting toilets and by participating in search and rescue for lost and injured hikers.

    I think peakbagger accurately describes the hut experience and i agree that folks who were expecting the mt. Washington hotel will have a disappointing experience. Likewise, those who are used to staying in tents and shelters my well find the hut experience not worth the money.

    There are, however, groups for whom the huts are valued. The idea of staying overnight in the wilderness is intimidating to many people. The ability to have a safe, dry, and somewhat warm place to sleep at night allows them to venture beyond day hikes and experience the mountain in a different way. Likewise, parents wanting to take their children on a hiking adventure and introduce them to the outdoors appreciate the "comforts" of the huts. There are also people with physical limitation who are able to experience multi-day hikes because they don't have to carry a shelter and a much supplies. Many of these categories of hikers will go on to less expensive and more adventuresome forms of hiking. For others, the occasional splurge on a hut stay will be the pinnacle of their wilderness experience. From their stays in the huts almost all of these people will have their appreciation for the outdoors grow, will likely become better stewards of nature, and some will become strong advocates for preservation -- even if they never spend a night in a tent or shelter.

    If you don't like the hut experience, or feel it is too expensive, that is certainly understandable, but please know that there are many people who do appreciate it and for whom the huts have played a significant role in encouraging and helping them become more confident spending time in the outdoors. So we enjoy the croos silly skits, relish the communal meals, have fun climbing into our bunk beds, and enjoy moaning about all the snoring that took place during the night while we drink our coffee and eat our breakfast in the morning.

    Happy hiking.
    ^^^^^ this^^^^^

  20. #20
    imscotty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    Nope, its just the various media outlets seem to crank out variations of the same articles every year after year as it makes nice filler with pretty pictures. Unfortunately many of the folks who buy the image have a steep learning curve when they discover that a hut stay isn't a typical $175 a night experience. They are staying in unheated buildings and bunkrooms with stacks of bunks with minimal personal space. Folks going back and forth all night to use the facilities and a chorus of snoring and on occasion crying. A communal bathroom with no hot water or showers. Cramped quarters with cheek to cheek seating during meals and organized begging/extortion to tip the hut crews. Folks used to tent camping and backcountry shelters probably appreciate it but the readers of the typical high end media these articles pop up in are probably out of their element.
    That's a great theory Peakbagger, but the Tripadvisor reviews from people who have actually stayed there seem to shoot your argument down...

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Hotel_Re...Hampshire.html

    I agree, the hut experience is not for everyone. But for the self-selecting group that books the AMC hut experience and makes that hike they seem to love it for the most part.
    “For of all sad words of tongue or pen,
    the saddest are these, 'It might have been.”


    John Greenleaf Whittier

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