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  1. #1
    Registered User GolfHiker's Avatar
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    Default Altra Lone Peak 4 vs Altra Timp 1.5

    This is a 2 part question for all the Altra folks out there.

    1) For backpacking the AT, 30 lb. max load, which model do you prefer? Lone Peak 4 or Timp 1.5?Itís my understanding that the Timp is a bit cushier, which sounds nice. ( Iíve been a Hoka Challenger & Speedgoat 2 guy for a while now, and Iím seeking alternatives). BTW, Iím 6í1, 165, so no stress issues here.
    2) Iím only marginally familiar with the zero drop shoes vs. the traditional 5-10cm heel in my Hokas. My concern is not comfort or durability, but rather the transition to the zero drop. Will I have issues, experience any discomfort in the feet, legs or tendons, because of the difference in foot strike, etc.

    i see only only glowing reviews for the Altraís, but no mention of any issues for someone transitioning to the zero drop. I thought Iíd go to those whoíve been there, done that..

    Thanks.
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  2. #2
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    I don't recommend the Altra Lone Peak 4 because the front flap at the toe began to separate on both of my shoes at about 20 miles or so.A friend has an identical pair and his started coming loose at only 5 miles or so.He told me it's a common problem and not to worry about it.Seriously? I used flowable silicon on mine and will test them out on a short hike tomorrow.We'll see.Anyone else have the same issue?

  3. #3
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    Having no bio-mechanical issues with neutral pronation and high arch as an ULer attached myself too quickly to the Altra Zero Drop Olympus and LP hiker rage coming from Hoka Stinson ATR and Challenger ATR's with 5 mm drops. It caused PT which I never previously experienced with nothing I can tell happened from common PT causes. I went back to Hokas and my feet and PT are finally happier after 8 months of debilitating PT. I went with Altras because 1) the anatomical toe box and shape which I still love with my splayed "Squatch" feet 2) admittedly was too strongly influenced by the popularity of Altras in the running and backpacking communities.


    If going to zero drops might want to transition more incrementally from 10 mm drops using differnt thicknesses heel pads.

  4. #4
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    I had some minor issues when I first switched to zero drop Altras from the Keens I wore for years. I have tight muscles and tendons. I experienced pain in my Achilles’ tendon when I first began wearing them, but after a few hikes that went away. Altra does recommend a break in period in which you wear them for only a few hours at a time until you are used to them. That said, I have friends who switched to them and had no issues at all. I love my Altras and will keep buying them. As for the toe kick coming loose, I had that happen in my first pair of Lone Peak 2.5’s, but my second and third pairs (both 3.0’s) have not had that happen, and I put around 700-800 miles on each pair.

  5. #5
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    My Lone Peak 4's may be the most comfortable show I've ever worn. I don't have a problem adjusting to the zero drop. I think people make a bigger deal out of it than it is, but maybe I'm just not sensitive to it.

    I did notice my toe guard was starting to separate. What is the stuff called to seal it up?

  6. #6
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    It's not just the drop but the arch support. Altras have no stock mid-high arch support. Altras work best for people with flat feet. Those with high arches are going to require after market arch supporting footbeds.

    Significantly high and raised heels 12mm+ with steep slopes(ramp angles) from heel to forefoot have been associated with questionable form(heavy heel striking being one) and pronations correlated with injury and inefficiencies. 5-10 mm drops have generally been considered minmalist shoes. 0-5 mmm zero drop. Going to zero drop is the far end of that scale. Some of the reasons for transitioning to zero drops is to correct form and reducing injury. It also arose out of the acheivments and popularizing of bare foot running. I didn't need to have form corrected and never had a running, hiking, sports injury other than shin splints. I did Altras for their ananatomical foot shape and super wide toe box as Keens also can be designed with a blunt squared off toe box but aren't zero drop. After about a decade of populrizing Zero Drop shoes research by Runners World suggest equally cushioned zero drops have not been the pancea for preventing injury as had been thought.

    A lot of Altras comfort comes in the form of their footshape and super wide toe box. Many people opt for too narrow of a width and shape and these eventually solve that issue.

  7. #7
    Registered User GolfHiker's Avatar
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    Flash back to 1972... does anyone remember the Earth Shoes. I’m pretty sure they were a minus drop! Not very comfortable, but we all looked cool wearing them.

    This is is not relevant, but the thought just occurred to me.
    "How can something this hard be so much fun".

  8. #8
    Leonidas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Five Tango View Post
    I don't recommend the Altra Lone Peak 4 because the front flap at the toe began to separate on both of my shoes at about 20 miles or so.A friend has an identical pair and his started coming loose at only 5 miles or so.He told me it's a common problem and not to worry about it.Seriously? I used flowable silicon on mine and will test them out on a short hike tomorrow.We'll see.Anyone else have the same issue?
    All trail Altras do this. I started running a bead of super glue around the area before I ever wear them. So far it has held for 100+ miles on my LP 3.0. My Kings separated there but never got worse than just slightly pealing. I will do it on my Timps before I wear those once the LPs wear out. As for the LP 4.0, I have seen several people mention that the 4.0s have lost their midsole support in less than 100 miles. Altra changed the foam when they changed the outsole apparently.
    AT: 274.5 mi

    Pinhoti Trail: 254 mi

    @leonidasonthetrail

  9. #9

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    I just moved from the Lone Peak 3.4 to the Timp 1.5 and have been very happy. They are more like the OG Lone Peaks.

    I moved to zero drop to adpot a more natural foot position and improve posture

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