Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7
Results 121 to 124 of 124
  1. #121
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    17,766

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Berserker View Post
    Yeah, that could be because I'm sure they're there. However, I also look for fresh turds in the morning if I stay in a shelter, and didn't recall seeing any as I have the other few times I have stayed in a shelter...and even in my tent when I left the door open one time
    Look along the base of walls and top plates of walls. Look at where mice trapeezes are atatched at the top. Under shelter's with a floor where there are small slat spaces between boards there can be several inches high mouse droppings. Mice also urinate. Mice will shart and urinate on you. Mice will climb on you and your belongings. Norovirus is spread through feces.

  2. #122
    Registered User soilman's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2010
    Location
    Chillicothe, OH
    Age
    65
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Look along the base of walls and top plates of walls. Look at where mice trapeezes are atatched at the top. Under shelter's with a floor where there are small slat spaces between boards there can be several inches high mouse droppings. Mice also urinate. Mice will shart and urinate on you. Mice will climb on you and your belongings. Norovirus is spread through feces.
    Human feces or mouse feces? Mouse feces is a carrier of hantavirus. Have not heard that mice can transmit noro.
    More walking, less talking.

  3. #123
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    52
    Posts
    4,245
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by soilman View Post
    Human feces or mouse feces? Mouse feces is a carrier of hantavirus. Have not heard that mice can transmit noro.
    I tried Googling the subject of "can mice transmit norovirus".I couldn't find a definitive answer, but it seems like over all, mice feces either isn't a carrier of norovirus, or at least is unlikely to.
    However, did come across one study that suggested rat and bird feces might be a carrier.

  4. #124

    Default

    While rodent fecal material may or may not carry norovirus, there are other gifts rodents bring to the table, literally. Leptospirosis is one of these very special gifts that can muck things up.

    Primary carriers of leptospirosis are rats, mice, and voles, though other mammals can and do acquire the bacteria and spread it around. This bacteria is usually associated with tropical conditions and is usually not much of an issue in temperate areas like the eastern United States. However during wet years (like this one) the Leptospira bacteria can remain active on damp surfaces like shelter floors, walls, tables, chairs, logs/stumps, rocks, and sticks for fires for long periods of time. Years like this one make me wonder if this nasty little bacteria is mistaken for norovirus since symptoms can be similar.

    Humans can be infected via ingestion from contaminated water or food, but most commonly acquire the bacteria through simple skin contact with a surface having urine on it. The bacteria is absorbed through broken skin, even very minor light scratches from brambles, etc. Carriers that infect humans are nearly exclusively mammals, dogs, deer, rabbits, porcupines, cows, sheep, pigs, raccoons, opossum, and skunks are common secondary carriers who can harbor the bacteria and provide ample opportunity for it to be delivered in a broad number of places humans occupy. For example, a dog nosing around a shelter and doing what dogs do to investigate can return with active bacteria around their faces. A mouse, chipmunk or raccoon in a pack can deposit bacteria that can remain active for long periods of time if conditions are right.

    Interestingly, humans rarely infect other humans and fortunately the bacteria is usually cleansed from the human body in about 60 days left on its own. Use of antibiotics is not a panacea due to the relative difficulty in diagnosis and uneven symptom development between people. In some people this bacteria can cause serious renal problems so it's not something that should be ignored if symptoms last more than week.

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •