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  1. #1
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    Default Going back to ground...

    Hello All,

    Swapped over to a hammock years ago and have not looked back(Dutch Hammock w/hardware, HG Quilts, WB Superfly). A hammock suits me well in the southeast, providing endless camp spots; Not to mention a much better sleep(and warmer)! <---I know, subjective...

    However, now a trip to the Wind River Range,WY is in the works and I'll need to plan to go to ground. I do have a TT Stratospire 2, but was considering just a mesh inner to go under my WB Superfly. We (Superfly and I) have a bond...hate to leave her home for what is sure to be an amazing trip : )

    A couple years ago I came across a mesh tent with offset doors to help avoid the trekking poles used to support the tent. The doors really opened more like a crescent/arch on the corner. Very different, but functional design. Can't seem to find it...Anyone else seen this, and recall the maker? Best I recall price was around $100 or less.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by clusterone; 04-10-2019 at 08:15.

  2. #2
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    I know the Sierra Designs High Route has offset doors but you can't buy just the inner, you have to buy the inner and the rain fly together. There has been a redesign for 2019 that has reduced the weight on this tent. I'm sure you can probably get a deal on the older version now that they new one is out. The older version is Red/white and the new Blue/ yellow, not that color matters just so you will know which one you are looking at on websites.


    https://www.backcountryedge.com/sier...oute-2019.html
    Last edited by dwcoyote; 04-09-2019 at 20:24.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, will check it out.
    Quote Originally Posted by dwcoyote View Post
    I know the Sierra Designs High Route has offset doors but you can't buy just the inner, you have to buy the inner and the rain fly together. There has been a redesign for 2019 that has reduced the weight on this tent. I'm sure you can probably get a deal on the older version now that they new one is out. The older version is Red/white and the new Blue/ yellow, not that color matters just so you will know which one you are looking at on websites.


    https://www.backcountryedge.com/sier...oute-2019.html

  4. #4
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    I am a committed hammock camper but, like you, I occasionally travel where a hammock is not the best option. After trying several options to work with my hammock tarps, I eventually purchased a TT Stratospire 2. Originally I used my hiking poles but, eventualy I bought the accessory poles for use when my hiking poles aren't along. Weight, compactness and space all make the Stratospire 2 a great choice when the hammock stays home.

    You have the perfect gear. Accept it and break the "bond" with the SuperFly.

  5. #5

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    Why do you need to plan to go to ground? Are you doing the high route?

    I have spent plenty of time in the WRR and there were endless options for hanging...one of our group hammocked last year. Sure, it might be a little tougher than on the AT to find the best trees, or a little further from the campsite of others you are with but it is definitely doable.

  6. #6
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    OCDave - I know you are right...

    DuneElliot -

    Oh am I glad to hear from someone who knows the area. Still just getting all the dates and flights worked out, so have not done much route planning. Else I would have a ton of questions for you! Won't have enough time to do the entire High Route Trail, so considering starting at the northern terminus(Green River Lake TH, or Trail Lakes TH) and doing an out and back to Gannett peak, or there about(or loop if possible, or maybe come out to New Fork TH). All TBD. Honestly, having trouble determining how many mph can be expected, so trying to not set us up for too many miles, just in case. First trip out west to decent elevation... Do want to have time to enjoy the place, not just burn through it. Would love to hang, but just noticed many/most on the ground in videos and trip reports. Plan to acclimate around Denver for a couple days prior to driving up to WY. Also seeing a ton of posts about mosquito so assume bugnet is a must/can be desired? Any advice is most welcome!

    Thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
    Why do you need to plan to go to ground? Are you doing the high route?

    I have spent plenty of time in the WRR and there were endless options for hanging...one of our group hammocked last year. Sure, it might be a little tougher than on the AT to find the best trees, or a little further from the campsite of others you are with but it is definitely doable.
    Last edited by clusterone; 04-10-2019 at 15:36.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by clusterone View Post
    OCDave - I know you are right...

    DuneElliot -

    Oh am I glad to hear from someone who knows the area. Still just getting all the dates and flights worked out, so have not done much route planning. Else I would have a ton of questions for you! Won't have enough time to do the entire High Route Trail, so considering starting at the northern terminus(Green River Lake TH, or Trail Lakes TH) and doing an out and back to Gannett peak, or there about(or loop if possible, or maybe come out to New Fork TH). All TBD. Honestly, having trouble determining how many mph can be expected, so trying to not set us up for too many miles, just in case. First trip out west to decent elevation... Do want to have time to enjoy the place, not just burn through it. Would love to hang, but just noticed many/most on the ground in videos and trip reports. Plan to acclimate around Denver for a couple days prior to driving up to WY. Also seeing a ton of posts about mosquito so assume bugnet is a must/can be desired? Any advice is most welcome!

    Thanks!
    Hit me up with any questions you have.

    Titcomb Basin would be the only place that we went that would be problematic to hang.

    As far as MPD...don't expect to do more than 12 and still enjoy it. The views are worth sticking to that kind of mileage and unless you are some kind of machine-like hiker you won't get much more than that anyway.

    Mosquitoes are only an issue at certain times....just like any mountain range out west, and dependent on how much snow pack there was. Generally any time after August 1st should be fairly mosquito free and almost guaranteed to only see a few after mid August. If you are going in July, then yes, expect mosquitoes and take a bug net and spray.

    A good loop to do Gannett Peak from Green River (and I'm doing this from memory) would be to hike up the CDT towards Titcomb and climb Gannett from that area (or sooner depending on which way you want to approach it from). You can then hike back on the same trail for a bit and take a turn off to Lozier Lakes on the New Fork Trail and go back to Green River via Porcupine Pass. Gannett Peak is easier to access from the Glacier Trail and TH if your priority is climbing the peak.

  8. #8
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    MODERATOR----FEEL FREE TO MOVE TO "OTHER TRAILS" AS THE CONVERSATION HAS SHIFTED. Would PM DuneElliot, but others might find this info useful.


    DuneElliot,

    THANKS! The news on the mosquitoes is great to hear. We will be going the end of August. Still hard to comprehend 12miles a day out there, but guessing some of it is rather easy while other parts more difficult? Maybe the "unknowns(elevation, terrain)" have me overthinking the difficulty...

    After some more research looks like we will do better to start at the Trail Lakes TH. This is based around drive times(coming in from the east). Have you hiked from there to the Gannett area? I have Skurka's High Route guide that shows about 25miles to the Gannett area. Having the maps and data points makes this an attractive option. Think hanging is possible for that route? Do you rate it as a breathtaking route(views)?

    Regards,

    Clusterone

    Quote Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
    Hit me up with any questions you have.

    Titcomb Basin would be the only place that we went that would be problematic to hang.

    As far as MPD...don't expect to do more than 12 and still enjoy it. The views are worth sticking to that kind of mileage and unless you are some kind of machine-like hiker you won't get much more than that anyway.

    Mosquitoes are only an issue at certain times....just like any mountain range out west, and dependent on how much snow pack there was. Generally any time after August 1st should be fairly mosquito free and almost guaranteed to only see a few after mid August. If you are going in July, then yes, expect mosquitoes and take a bug net and spray.

    A good loop to do Gannett Peak from Green River (and I'm doing this from memory) would be to hike up the CDT towards Titcomb and climb Gannett from that area (or sooner depending on which way you want to approach it from). You can then hike back on the same trail for a bit and take a turn off to Lozier Lakes on the New Fork Trail and go back to Green River via Porcupine Pass. Gannett Peak is easier to access from the Glacier Trail and TH if your priority is climbing the peak.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by clusterone View Post
    MODERATOR----FEEL FREE TO MOVE TO "OTHER TRAILS" AS THE CONVERSATION HAS SHIFTED. Would PM DuneElliot, but others might find this info useful.


    DuneElliot,

    THANKS! The news on the mosquitoes is great to hear. We will be going the end of August. Still hard to comprehend 12miles a day out there, but guessing some of it is rather easy while other parts more difficult? Maybe the "unknowns(elevation, terrain)" have me overthinking the difficulty...

    After some more research looks like we will do better to start at the Trail Lakes TH. This is based around drive times(coming in from the east). Have you hiked from there to the Gannett area? I have Skurka's High Route guide that shows about 25miles to the Gannett area. Having the maps and data points makes this an attractive option. Think hanging is possible for that route? Do you rate it as a breathtaking route(views)?

    Regards,

    Clusterone
    I have not done the route to Gannett from Trails Lake TH so I really can't comment on the views. I know our route up from Green River was one of the most amazing scenic routes I've done in the Winds and included the famous Squaretop Mtn. I'm sure that the route from Trail Lakes TH will be stunning too...nothing in the Winds has bad views but I believe it is a very popular route to Gannett and not as varied as Green River as is basically a 25 mile hike up a valley. Judging from what I saw dropping off notbad at the TH there it wasn't the prettiest section of the Winds...very much foothills for quite a while before you get into the best bits. I'll see if notbad can chime in on this as he's done both, or at least the lower part of the Trails Lake Trail.

    As far as the 12mpd goes...that would be my max for the Winds. But we usually started at 9 and were looking for camp about 4 and had a few breaks along the way...they do say when hiking the Winds to take your daily average and halve it but that also depends on where you are used to hiking. 10 mpd is definitely doable for most people.

  10. #10
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    What about a nice bivy under the tarp? I've been thinking about doing this myself.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by clusterone View Post
    Hello All,

    Swapped over to a hammock years ago and have not looked back(Dutch Hammock w/hardware, HG Quilts, WB Superfly). A hammock suits me well in the southeast, providing endless camp spots; Not to mention a much better sleep(and warmer)! <---I know, subjective...

    However, now a trip to the Wind River Range,WY is in the works and I'll need to plan to go to ground. I do have a TT Stratospire 2, but was considering just a mesh inner to go under my WB Superfly. We (Superfly and I) have a bond...hate to leave her home for what is sure to be an amazing trip : )

    A couple years ago I came across a mesh tent with offset doors to help avoid the trekking poles used to support the tent. The doors really opened more like a crescent/arch on the corner. Very different, but functional design. Can't seem to find it...Anyone else seen this, and recall the maker? Best I recall price was around $100 or less.

    Thanks!
    I've seen something like what you speak of, but it was heavy. MSR Thru Hiker Mesh House sounds close to what you're looking for. If the poles are set up at the ends of the tarp, they shouldn't interfere with the doors.

  12. #12
    Registered User scope's Avatar
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    Do you need a net? I did the same thing when I went to RMNP, but just took my tarp and a pad. Wish I had taken the hammock, though. Slim pickin's for good trees, but I'm sure I could've made it work. Wished I at least had the option to try. I know, who needs another lb. in the pack, right? Still, I wish I took it.
    "I wonder if anyone else has an ear so tuned and sharpened as I have, to detect the music, not of the spheres, but of earth, subtleties of major and minor chord that the wind strikes upon the tree branches. Have you ever heard the earth breathe... ?"
    - Kate Chopin

  13. #13
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    I've spent weeks at a time in the Winds without seeing a single tree or bush. Treeline is pretty low there (for the Rockies, anyhow). If you plan on being above about 8000', I agree that a hammock is unlikely to suffice.

    I also agree with some others that a mesh inner is completely unnecessary in the Winds. Never used one there, never needed one.

  14. #14
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    "Weeks at a time..."<-very cool! Any comments on starting at Lake TH to Gannet Area? Thanks everyone! Really appreciate all the input; keep it coming!


    Quote Originally Posted by Zalman View Post
    I've spent weeks at a time in the Winds without seeing a single tree or bush. Treeline is pretty low there (for the Rockies, anyhow). If you plan on being above about 8000', I agree that a hammock is unlikely to suffice.

    I also agree with some others that a mesh inner is completely unnecessary in the Winds. Never used one there, never needed one.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zalman View Post
    I've spent weeks at a time in the Winds without seeing a single tree or bush. Treeline is pretty low there (for the Rockies, anyhow). If you plan on being above about 8000', I agree that a hammock is unlikely to suffice.

    I also agree with some others that a mesh inner is completely unnecessary in the Winds. Never used one there, never needed one.
    Dang...you can't have come down off the peaks much then

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by clusterone View Post
    Hello All,

    Swapped over to a hammock years ago and have not looked back(Dutch Hammock w/hardware, HG Quilts, WB Superfly). A hammock suits me well in the southeast, providing endless camp spots; Not to mention a much better sleep(and warmer)! <---I know, subjective...

    However, now a trip to the Wind River Range,WY is in the works and I'll need to plan to go to ground. I do have a TT Stratospire 2, but was considering just a mesh inner to go under my WB Superfly. We (Superfly and I) have a bond...hate to leave her home for what is sure to be an amazing trip : )

    A couple years ago I came across a mesh tent with offset doors to help avoid the trekking poles used to support the tent. The doors really opened more like a crescent/arch on the corner. Very different, but functional design. Can't seem to find it...Anyone else seen this, and recall the maker? Best I recall price was around $100 or less.

    Thanks!
    Sounds like youíre finding ways to keep your hammock, which is great news. Like you Iíve been researching net tents to possibly use with my Superfly, and here are some Iíve found:

    RAB Element, $75 (one of the few with end doors)
    Borah Gear Big Bivy, $75-$82
    Mountain Laurel Designs Bug Bivy, $125
    Yama Mountain Gear, $145

    Iíve found a few more, but these are the ones I remember right off the top of my head. Personally Iím keeping an eye open at the RAB.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  17. #17
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    Update- Had the Superfly(actual two) up in 45MPH winds (with single pole mod) this last weekend. While they did not fall apart, the sides completely blow in, slapping the hammock (adding extra side tie-outs provided little help. Buddy had one of his shock cords on a corner tie-out break. So seeing as the WRR has Wind in the name...starting to think a proper tent might be the best choice.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by clusterone View Post
    Update- Had the Superfly(actual two) up in 45MPH winds (with single pole mod) this last weekend. While they did not fall apart, the sides completely blow in, slapping the hammock (adding extra side tie-outs provided little help. Buddy had one of his shock cords on a corner tie-out break. So seeing as the WRR has Wind in the name...starting to think a proper tent might be the best choice.
    Ha ha. While Wyoming is pretty damned windy that is generally limited more to the plains and high prairie/desert. If you want to take a hammock because you sleep better, then you will have no problems finding a place to hang as long as you are camping at or below treeline. However, if you are going with a group and want to camp and sleep with the group...a tent is definitely easier if that's what everyone else is using.

    Going back to my comments about trails earlier, notbad only did the last 6 miles of the Trail Lakes Trail to the TH. It was pretty bland, but he thinks that once you get further in it is probably very pretty in the valley. A quick look on Google for some pictures might help, and have a look at Google Earth. Just be aware that it will be busier than coming in from Green River.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by clusterone View Post
    Update- Had the Superfly(actual two) up in 45MPH winds (with single pole mod) this last weekend. While they did not fall apart, the sides completely blow in, slapping the hammock (adding extra side tie-outs provided little help. Buddy had one of his shock cords on a corner tie-out break. So seeing as the WRR has Wind in the name...starting to think a proper tent might be the best choice.
    Iíve been eyeing a couple of inexpensive tents just in case of these type situations where I might be above tree line or in areas where hanging would be difficult. Check out the 3F UL Lanshan 1 and Lanshan 2 tents. Both under $150 and have good reviews (and an almost cult-like following, not unlike hammocks). The Lanshan 2 is basically a silnylon copy of a Duplex but double wall. The 1 is close to an MLD Solomid.


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  20. #20
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    Cool

    For clusterone:
    Wind River Range.

    Elkhart Park trailhead. Paved road from Pinedale.
    https://backcountrypost.com/threads/...uly-2018.7899/

    My feelings about Denver are: Exit Denver ASAP! At 5,000', it's a waste of time for acclimating.
    The Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming Hwy 130 between Laramie & Saratoga, WY. has numerous campgrounds along the highway. Elevations from 7,000' to 10,000'. Leaving the Denver airport at noon and shopping at REI in Fort Collins, we got to the Snowy Range well before dark in early September. I had a bad experience reserving a campsite without seeing it first. I suggest you select a site in person. There are numerous large campgrounds to choose from.
    https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/mbr/...81614&actid=29
    Saratoga (Lollipop Cafe!), Rawlins, Rock Springs, Pinedale, Trailhead. Have Fun!
    Wayne
    Last edited by Venchka; 04-16-2019 at 11:40.
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