Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    732

    Default Throw Bag Material?

    At the risk of asking a question that is akin to, "What diesel truck is healthiest for the environment", here goes.

    With respect to hanging your food bag PCT-style, what material is a good, durable one for the throw bag, particularly when the odds of it landing on a rock are pretty good?

    Yesterday I had occasion to do a PCT-style food bag hang, and after some fits and starts, got what I think was a particularly good hang (as these things go). Quite a bit of luck involved in finding an ideal branch in the area. However, leading up to finding that branch, I made some failed throws at other locations, and once at the final location. At least once the throw bag landed on a rock, and I came back with a small hole in it.*

    I was using one of those roll-top waterproof bags, pretty cheap ones (Outdoor Products, WM), polyurethane coated ripstop, it appears. Not a big loss, and even probably fixable to an extent.

    Wondering if there's a better material to be using for a throw bag. Seemed silly in retrospect to sacrifice a waterproof stuff sack for this, but I'm not sure if there's a cheaper and more durable option. Any suggestions? Thanks.


    *I think the abrasion came from the ground (outside the throw bag), since it bag had a fist-sized rock in it wrapped up in a rag and put in a ziplock so it wouldn't roll out of the rag easily. The ziplock was not punctured.

  2. #2

    Default

    Any small mesh pouch capable of holding a moderately sized rock is perfectly adequate. No need for a solid material. I use the same mesh bag that holds the rope itself.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-11-2015
    Location
    Blairsville ,GA
    Posts
    217

    Default

    I use cordura. Might be heavier than needed, but small enough to make little difference and will last for ages.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    732

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skater View Post
    I use cordura. Might be heavier than needed, but small enough to make little difference and will last for ages.
    I thought about cordura, as it was a preferred material for motorcycle riding gear when I was in my "ATGATT" days. Where does one buy cordura bags, or did you just make yours? Curious. Thanks - TZ

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,586
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    I have several.
    Who cares if it gets a little hole in it.
    And it doesn't need to be big
    If it holds a golf ball sized rock or a little bigger that's plenty.

    the one I prefer is my little z-pack line sack made of cuben

    Another good free one, is the little plastic mesh sacks that garlic comes in at the grocery store. That was not real durable though.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-15-2008
    Location
    Randolph, NH
    Posts
    10,382
    Images
    34

    Default

    I use my 20 oz soda bottle about 1/4 full of water. Guaranteed never to snag and always come down. You need pretty thin cord to tie around the neck though.

    Still, it always takes 3-4 tries, it never goes the way I want it to go.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-20-2013
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Age
    65
    Posts
    844
    Images
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    I have several.
    Who cares if it gets a little hole in it.
    And it doesn't need to be big
    If it holds a golf ball sized rock or a little bigger that's plenty.

    the one I prefer is my little z-pack line sack made of cuben

    Another good free one, is the little plastic mesh sacks that garlic comes in at the grocery store. That was not real durable though.

    +1 on the garlic bag. I also had the rock inside part of a plastic bag (I think to protect from abrasion).

    Worked for my southern half hike last year and using it for the rest of the way this year.

    I’ve carried that rock from Pittsburgh to GA and back to PA.
    76 HawkMtn w/Rangers
    13 HF>CramptonsG
    14 LHHT
    15 Girard/Quebec/LostTurkey/Saylor/Tuscarora/BlackForest
    16 Kennerdell/Cranberry-Otter/DollyS/WRim-NCT
    17 BearR
    18 NOBO AT halfway

  8. #8
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-02-2007
    Location
    Rhome, TX / Monroe, NH
    Age
    62
    Posts
    7,509
    Images
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RangerZ View Post
    +1 on the garlic bag. I also had the rock inside part of a plastic bag (I think to protect from abrasion).

    Worked for my southern half hike last year and using it for the rest of the way this year.

    I’ve carried that rock from Pittsburgh to GA and back to PA.
    Hmmm, just makes one wonder if there is a potential market for (UL) rocks for bear bags...
    ...or bottles: Just fill with water and throw - bag and line included and free shipping for only $9.99 (water not included ...)

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    732

    Default

    Maybe if you're good with cordage and knots, no bag is required? Just wrap the cord around the rock, secure it with a slippery half-hitch, and throw it.

  10. #10
    Registered User hikermiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-24-2007
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Age
    72
    Posts
    98

    Default

    I use either a garlic/shallot bag or a cheapo stuff sack from Walmart.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-15-2008
    Location
    Randolph, NH
    Posts
    10,382
    Images
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Time Zone View Post
    Maybe if you're good with cordage and knots, no bag is required? Just wrap the cord around the rock, secure it with a slippery half-hitch, and throw it.
    That rarely works. I once found the perfect rock, fit in the hand nicely, wasn't too heavy or too light and had a dog bone shape so the rope didn't slide off. After I used it I contemplated for a good 2 minutes wondering if I should hold onto that rock. I then came to my senses and tossed it.

    The soda bottle trick works much better.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,586
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    1. If you need your flimsy water bottles to hold your water, its foolish to throw them around. Ive had a couple with holes from just 2' fall onto gravel. I baby my water bottles. They are one of the most important gear items.

    2. Rock bags can be filled with dirt or gravel when no appropriately sized rocks available, or water.

    3. You can stuff line in them , comes out ez and completely tangle free, keeps neatly stored in pack. But its slow . Even wrapping figure 8 introduces twists which cause some misbehavior.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 03-14-2019 at 10:01.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-10-2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Age
    56
    Posts
    350

    Default

    I have used the silly little sack that came with my pack cover, mostly because my pack cover was always on my pack and never in that silly little sack....
    fortis fortuna adjuvat

  14. #14

    Default

    I can't see spending money on an item that's eventually going to get stuck in a tree. I actually sewed a tiny throw bag out of spare fabric, which cost me about nothing. When I lost that, I started just wrapping a rock with the end of the cord, reversing the direction of the wind once in a while... sure you'd lose the rock once in a while.

    That worked well, until I found a site with exactly one rock and deep leaves. After searching for a rock, a stick, or anything throwable for a bit. I didn't want to risk throwing my water bottle, or fuel bottle, knife, or any other useful piece of gear. I eventually just filled a small ziploc bag with a bit of water and used that.
    Last edited by Puddlefish; 03-14-2019 at 10:36.

  15. #15

    Default

    I just tie the cord around the rock.
    Perhaps the secret to not having it come loose is to wrap the cord around the rock twice.
    I prefer it to be larger than a golf ball, smaller than an orange. It needs to be heavy enough to overcome the friction of the cord sliding over the branch.

    It may take a minute longer than just dropping a rock or some sand in a bag...and when fingers are numb, it becomes MUCH more difficult...hey, maybe there's something to this bag trick after all.

    One concern: is the bag more likely to snag on things than the rock alone?

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    1. If you need your flimsy water bottles to hold your water, its foolish to throw them around. Ive had a couple with holes from just 2' fall onto gravel. I baby my water bottles. They are one of the most important gear items........
    Good point. Seltzer water bottles are much tougher than regular water bottles because they have to withstand the pressure of a carbonated beverage and the weight difference is negligible. For 60 cents you can get a liter bottle of store brand flavored seltzer at our local store, enjoy the seltzer and have a sturdy water bottle.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-20-2013
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Age
    65
    Posts
    844
    Images
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Puddlefish View Post
    I can't see spending money on an item that's eventually going to get stuck in a tree. I actually sewed a tiny throw bag out of spare fabric, which cost me about nothing. When I lost that, I started just wrapping a rock with the end of the cord, reversing the direction of the wind once in a while... sure you'd lose the rock once in a while.
    That worked well, until I found a site with exactly one rock and deep leaves. After searching for a rock, a stick, or anything throwable for a bit. I didn't want to risk throwing my water bottle, or fuel bottle, knife, or any other useful piece of gear. I eventually just filled a small ziploc bag with a bit of water and used that.

    I used to just tie my line around a rock but then sometimes I’d see the rock go soaring off without the line.

    Also, for trails that can be pretty rocky, there wouldn’t be a good rock when I needed it.

    Hence, the garlic bag and dedicated rock.
    76 HawkMtn w/Rangers
    13 HF>CramptonsG
    14 LHHT
    15 Girard/Quebec/LostTurkey/Saylor/Tuscarora/BlackForest
    16 Kennerdell/Cranberry-Otter/DollyS/WRim-NCT
    17 BearR
    18 NOBO AT halfway

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-15-2008
    Location
    Randolph, NH
    Posts
    10,382
    Images
    34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    1. If you need your flimsy water bottles to hold your water, its foolish to throw them around. Ive had a couple with holes from just 2' fall onto gravel. I baby my water bottles. They are one of the most important gear items.
    Plastic water bottles are nearly indestructible. The flimsy ones I suck the air out of them to collapse them and can do that 100's of times. Carbonated soda bottles are equally indestructible.

    Don't use a hard plastic bottle like a Nalgene, I've seen plenty of those stuck in trees (plus its the wrong shape), along with knives, carabiners, plenty of rocks, rock bags and assorted hardware. Even a 6" adjustable crescent wrench! Anything small enough to wrap around a branch when you try to pull it down will wrap around that branch or get stuck.

    The only incident I've had with the soda bottle was when I missed the branch but nailed by alcohol stove square and flattened it. But the stove worked fine once I uncrunched it.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  19. #19
    Registered User ldsailor's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-25-2016
    Location
    St. Petersburg, FL
    Age
    69
    Posts
    414

    Default

    Never used a throw bag. Tie paracord around a rock and throw. The rock rarely separates from the cord.
    Trail Name - Slapshot
    "One step at a time."
    Blog - www.tonysadventure.com

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-08-2014
    Location
    Georgia
    Age
    66
    Posts
    488

    Default

    I have had great results with a small sized cheap water bottle like Slogoen has described.Something about the heft of it is just right.I've never had it want to wrap around like a bolo or get hung up either.Once I'm done I drink the potable water from the bottle and store it in the food bag.If it springs a leak from a pinhole I am sure a little tape would fix it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •